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Subject: Call of the Wild: Preview Session from FFG Arkham Nights 2012 rss

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Nersi Nikakhtar
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I had the opportunity at Fantasy Flight's Arkham Nights 2012 to play the new expansion to Mansions of Madness, Call of the Wild. Below are my initial impressions of the game, some of the mechanics that are new in the expansion, and a description of our game session. Please realize that we were four Investigators playing against the Keeper (a designer at FFG) in one scenario, and we only saw a portion of the scenario itself and some of the game mechanics. Therefore, there is much of the game I did not see, and I did not have a chance to read the game manual. But, here's what I know. (By the way, if you want to be surprised by the game, you should probably not read this.)

The version we saw appeared very nearly final. All the components were of the same quality and production you would expect in a retail version. One of the cards had some typographical errors, and a couple of them had some unclear text (our Keeper ruled on how we would play those cards to address these ambiguities). The plastic models were of the same quality as the base game. I anticipate that the final version of the game will look essentially the same as the version we saw.

THE INVESTIGATORS

First, there are four new Investigators, and they are all from the base Arkham Horror game: Mandy Thompson, Bob Jenkins, Monterey Jack, and Amanda Sharpe. They were laid out for us, and so we each took the character in front of us as we sat down. I didn't get to see all the particular abilities, but here is what abilities we used: Bob Jenkins was able, at the beginning of his turn, to stun himself and drink from his Whiskey card, healing one horror; the card did not get discarded. Amanda had a Care Package which allowed her to deal 2 damage to a monster or move it 1 space for the cost of one skill token. Alternatively, her Overdue Library Book (the other potential start item) lets her use a skill token to boost with her luck (3) a nearby Investigator's roll (as if they had used a skill token); she starts with 5. Her one-time ability is to heal a combination of stamina/sanity equal to her remaining skill tokens. Mandy Thompson was able to boost her Lore and also prevent monsters from using their special attacks on her. Her one-time ability was to automatically pass a Lore check on a tome. I didn't get much of a chance to see Monterey Jack in action.

THE MONSTERS

We only dealt with a few monsters in this scenario: a Maniac, a Wizard, and the Dunwich Horror (the Maniac is from the original game, the others added in this expansion). Other monsters I think are included were a Dark Young, Goat Spawn, Dark Druid, Child of the Goat, and Nightgaunt (not entirely sure about that last one).

THE GAME BOARD

The board tiles were set up similarly to Mansions of Madness, with the exception that almost all the tiles were outdoors with some small or single-room houses scattered throughout. Each tile counted as a separate room for attack purposes, however, which meant no shooting over several tiles. Some tiles were broken up into separate rooms by yellow lines, as there are no walls outside. Some tiles had impassable terrain (dashed white) lines, which blocks movement but not line of sight (these were all rivers). Some tiles had dashed yellow lines, which include features of both. There was also a submerged space (shown with a tentacle reaching out of water) in the middle of the board, which was impassable and does damage to any Investigator who lands there (as fire does), but it did not get used in our game. There were still some indoor areas with locked areas (including a locked area outside in apparently open space that ended up being fog; we did not find a way around it).

SOME NEW COMPONENTS

The biggest new component of setup was the addition of three Allies to the board. They are Eric Colt (from Arkham Horror), Corinna Jones, and Ammi Pierce (both from Dunwich Horror). Each has its own stamina and health (though adding up to 15 rather than 20). Each also has three attributes in its expertise rather than numbers for all of the attributes. If the Ally has to check against an attribute (e.g., in attacking a monster), if he possesses the requisite attribute, he succeeds automatically; if he does not, he fails automatically. Each Ally had a starting item (a tome for Corinna, a gun for Ammi, and a shovel for Eric). Finally, each Ally also had a deck of conversation cards. How the Allies were used in the game is explained below.

The Keeper, of course, had his own set of tokens and abilities. I did not get to see most of the, but he did have a couple extra pieces that were new: Delusion cards (with a screaming man on them) and Curse tokens (with pentagrams on them). Both are explained during the gameplay section below.

GAMEPLAY

We played the first scenario in the book, which featured a series of ritualistic murders that were meant to awaken an Eldritch horror. Our task was to figure out which of the three Allies on the board was the mastermind behind the killings and then accomplish a yet unknown task before the final sacrificial killing was made. We could find the identity of the villainous Ally by either finding two clues or finding three definitive rumors pointing to a specific Ally as a result of conversations with the Allies. (However, the Allies could also give rumors about other innocent Allies that are not true—effectively, they lie—but do not ever have a total of three of them pointing to anyone else.)

We immediately set off heading towards the three Allies, each of whom was sequestered in a separate building on different corners of the map. We spent some time picking up items along the way. Interestingly, all of the Exploration cards had something of value on them; none of them had the "You find nothing of interest" text on them, which made exploration a bit more useful. However, not all spaces had Exploration cards on them (unlike the original Mansions).

The Keeper was able to spawn a couple Maniacs from the edge of the map and, before long, a Wizard from the altar in the center of the map. They went not after us but after the Allies hiding in their buildings. Therefore, it soon became a matter of trying to get to the Allies first and defending them.

Each of us spent a bit of time interacting with an Ally. In order to do so, there is an ally step that occurs after the trading step (before the Keeper’s turn) that allows an Investigator in the same room as the Ally to talk to the Ally (reading the top card of the Ally’s deck) or, alternatively, allows the Investigator closest to an Ally to command the Ally (e.g., move or attack).

After a few conversations, the Allies offered rumors: Corinna pointed her finger at Eric, and Ammi rambled in an ancient tongue before regaining his composure. In another conversation, Corinna offered to smite one of the humanoid monsters on the board, at the cost of giving the Keeper another four threat tokens. (As both the Maniac and Wizard were nearly dead, we politely declined.)

Twice, we had “tasks”—effectively, side quests—from Ammi. First, he wanted us to collect wood, which meant that one of us had to deliver a “2x4” card to him. Luckily, Amanda found one lying around in the wood already and passed it off to Monterey Jack, who handed it over to the old man. Still not satisfied, he wanted us to move a log that he had cut down but was too heavy for him to carry (another “2x4” that the Keeper placed at that point in a space called “Old Oak Tree”). Only then would he give up the Silver Key that would unlock a shed that we later discovered contained a clue. (Incidentally, the 2x4 also serves as a blunt weapon that Amanda used on a Maniac. It can also be discarded to create a barrier on a door as bookcases do in the original Mansions, presumably because it got nailed against thes door.)

Allies start with items and can use any weapon they have but not other items. Allies will not give up their items unless given the “Bank Notes” card—money in exchange for their goods. We only found one, in Corinna’s home, which Amanda exchanged for Corinna’s tome. At another point, we were able to command Eric to use his shovel to kill of a Maniac who was bearing down on him. (The shovel can also dig or fill “pits,” though they didn’t factor into this scenario.) In combat, the Allies function as Investigators when resolving the effects of Combat cards, again succeeding or failing based on their listed ability expertise.

A new mechanic is that some cards have an “Attack” modifier on their “Action” ability, meaning that the action is an attack and thus does not require an evade check if done with a monster in the same space. For example, the “Handcuffs” Amanda found in Ammi’s home has an attack ability that will, with a successful strength role, stun a monster in that space.

Often, however, the Keeper had played a Delusion card on top of the Ally’s deck. The Keeper obtains Delusion cards into a hand (much as he would with Trauma cards) and is able to lay them on top of the conversation stack of an Ally who did not have one already at a cost of one Threat token. These Delusions effectively cause the Allies to spout raving nonsense, at best just delaying the conversation (because they get drawn instead of drawing a card that actually has the rumors in them). At worst, they do the Investigators harm.

One Delusion card from Ammi caused the Investigator to take a horror token after talking to him. A bit later in the game, the Keeper played a Delusion card on Eric so that, so when the Investigator talked to him, he went crazy (as “Willpower” is not one of his expertise traits, he failed the check) and beat a good bit of Ammi’s health down with his shovel. A third ("Leave Me Alone Already!") caused Corinna to attack Mandy because she had already had at least one conversation with that player and was apparently tired of being badgered. Yet another one of Ammi’s Delusions cursed Bob Jenkins, placing a Curse token on him.

Curse tokens get played to hinder the Investigators. The Keeper could have then discarded this to force Bob to reroll one roll (the Investigator still gets to use a skill token the second time if he used it the first time). Additionally, one of the Keeper cards he played on Bob was cheaper in Threat to play as a result of the curse.

As the game progressed, I noticed that the time limits on the Event deck were overall much shorter than most I have seen in Mansions of Madness, some of them resolving after only two Time tokens. Once we had three rumors (two pointing towards Eric, one towards Ammi), we felt fairly certain that Eric was the mastermind, even though the Keeper played Delusions on all three of them roughly equally. Add to that the fact that the monsters kept going after Ammi, and we were fairly well convinced the old man was innocent.

Bob applied some bandages to the now heavily wounded Ammi (spend an action and a skill point to heal someone two points without discarding the bandages; items that heal another Investigator equally apply to Allies) in a valiant effort to keep him alive. Meanwhile, Eric kept getting hits to his Sanity from the Keeper, who implied that when an Ally hits zero Sanity, the Keeper can control him (though the Investigators can still engage in conversation with him). We did not quite see the fruits of this.

Instead, the acquisition of three total rumors or two clues (we only had the former) triggered the Keeper’s ability to reveal the victory conditions: the Keeper wins if he sacrifices (kills) anybody other than the culprit, while the Investigators win by killing the culprit (now revealed to be, not surprisingly, Eric) before anyone else dies.

Shortly before the reveal, the Keeper had also sacrificed another Wizard at a hefty cost to turn him into a hulking Dunwich Horror at the central altar. Unfortunately, Ammi and Eric were in the same space, one space away, only Bob to hold off the Dunwich Horror.

The end came quickly. We had healed Ammi to 5 of his total 9 hit points, but the Dunwich Horror took a swipe at Ammi. The old man needed dexterity to avoid it, but he lacked the expertise, so the monster clawed at him for “damage +1”—five points total, killing him, bringing Eric’s nefarious plot to fruition with a final sacrifice.

CONCLUSIONS


Things I really enjoyed about this expansion:

1. Having all the Exploration cards contain useful materials was very nice in reducing the frustration of wasting an action to search for nothing.

2. We all loved the mystery-solving aspect of the scenario. Instead of the main mystery being trying to figure out which end of the mansion we explore first, we unraveled the mystery by talking to (and trying to keep alive) each Ally. One of the most spirited parts of the players’ conversation was trying to decide which Ally was evil. (Afterwards, one of the players commented that we might as well have just killed Eric of them without being sure with a third rumor, hoping for the best. In this case, it would have worked.)

3. The game moved much more quickly than Mansions of Madness scenarios, probably in part because of the shorter time limits on Event cards and in part because there is not as much time spent exploring every single room. Though we failed, the whole game took less than 90 minutes. (Granted, we had all played Mansions of Madness before).

Things I still need to explore more:

1. The idea of not being able to use range off of your tile (i.e., each time being a “different room”) seemed a bit odd. Granted, we didn’t get to look at the rule book, but this is what the Keeper told us. Still, it seems thematically strange that you can’t shoot your gun at a monster on an adjacent empty patch of grass because it’s technically on a different tile.

2. I’m also not entirely sure how the Keeper was accruing the Delusion cards (he kept most of his actions hidden from us). It seemed tough to gain ground at times because the Allies kept spouting Delusions instead of useful information, effectively delaying our progress.

3. I am also not sure how clues factor into the game itself, as we never revealed any during the course of our gameplay.

Summary:

That said, I’m very much looking forward to Call of the Wild. The open space, the mystery solving aspects, and the additional components (the addition of Allies in particular) give it a different enough feel from the base expansion or even Forbidden Alchemy to make it feel fresh rather than tacked on.

FFG currently anticipates an early 2013 release. Our Keeper said that, as of now, no delays are expected. My fingers are crossed.
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Andrew Wodzianski
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Cool session report! Thanks for posting! Silly question; did FFG have their copy of the miniatures painted?
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Nersi Nikakhtar
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Nope, standard gray. The monsters are available for separate purchase as painted minis from the FFG store, though.
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Randolph Bookman
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Is this a stand alone or do you need the base game?
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Jorgen Peddersen
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The edges of tiles indicate different rooms even in the base game. They shouldn't block line of sight, though (that's what the little white dots in the corners of exterior tiles are for), so you should be able to shoot monsters on adjacent tiles, provided your weapon has enough range and you have LoS. It would be weird if they changed that rule in the expansion, although I guess the tiles in question may have used these new yellow lines on their borders?

I did enjoy reading the report. I only just got the game myself and enjoy it immensely so far. The ally stuff does sound like it will add some really interesting changes to the game.
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Mark Chaplin
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Sounds terrific. Thanks, Nersi!


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Nersi Nikakhtar
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shieldwolf wrote:
Is this a stand alone or do you need the base game?

You need the base game.

Clipper wrote:
The edges of tiles indicate different rooms even in the base game. They shouldn't block line of sight, though (that's what the little white dots in the corners of exterior tiles are for), so you should be able to shoot monsters on adjacent tiles, provided your weapon has enough range and you have LoS.

That's what I thought, too. The yellow lines only ran down the middle of two tiles and broke up the tile itself. I suspect that our Keeper had us playing that rule incorrectly, as it made more sense to me to do it this way. However, I didn't get a chance to review the rule book (though it was done and printed), so I can't confirm that.

Despite that, it was still a lot of fun.
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Roberta Yang
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Pretty sure your keeper messed that rule up. He also messed up another rule: I was at Arkham Nights as well, and only the first of those two Ammi tasks was an actual task you had to complete - the second was an "Event" with no completion condition that I think was designed to put a 2x4 on the map to make it easier to complete the actual task. Sounds like your keeper just didn't know what he was doing.
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Nersi Nikakhtar
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I figured that the rule being misinterpreted might have been the case. Did you enjoy your session?
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Roberta Yang
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Absolutely. This scenario is amazing.

The allies are cool and flavorful (and notably, it seems that they don't even lie about each other - while they do sometimes incriminate allies other than the actual culprit, the flavor text reads less like deliberate lies and more like suspicions based on circumstantial evidence). It plays totally differently from normal scenarios. There were a lot of cool new items (contrast Forbidden Alchemy, which I'm pretty sure had more new keys than new actual items), and we got to see them very quickly (I'm not sure we stumbled across a single random Nothing of Interest, so either we got really lucky or that feature has been toned down). It played totally differently from regular scenarios, providing a unique experience I'd love to play again and again. It was fast. It was fun. It was really fun.

In our case, we suspected Ammi early on (had two rumors pointing to him and one pointing to Eric) but didn't act on it. That turned out to be our undoing - by the end, when we rushed to kill him, he stepped outside and started shooting Corinna with his gun, killing her a turn before we would have won.

Sounds like you were lucky enough to avoid the Wizard's special attack - fail a Lore test and he drops a Goat Spawn (new beast monster) on your head. (Luckily for us, our keeper sent the wizard after Corinna, who was a Lore Expert... but the traditional powerhouses like Michael McGlen and Joe Diamond that have Lore as a dump stat suddenly look a bit less tempting with that running around).

Based on my brief first impression of them, the new investigators seem strong. Not "strong" as in "game-breaking", but "strong" as in "very attractive" - they seem on par with the stronger investigators that have already been published, and whereas some base game investigators' items are pretty underwhelming (Flux Stabilizer? Really?), all the new starting items that I saw were really cool. I don't think there's a single new investigator I wouldn't be excited to play, and that's how it should be.

Seriously I love this expansion so much.
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Christopher Scatliff
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I concur with everything that was said. I was in this same Sunday session (I played Bob) and it was as described. I have no complaints about any of the new features, and this is a must-buy expansion for me.
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Cory C
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MoM is a great basic engine for all kinds of neat things - I hope they go far with this game!
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Sebastian Grawan
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CoryC wrote:
MoM is a great basic engine for all kinds of neat things - I hope they go far with this game!
I hope they won't release the expansion as bug-ridden as the first boxed expansion.
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Roberta Yang
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Forbidden Alchemy had bugs, but its real problem was that two of the scenarios are just plain unfun. Even with the map and objective 1C fixed, I still have no desire to touch LiTaS ever again.

If what I've seen of Call of the Wild is any indication, "the scenarios are unfun" will not be a problem.

(The generic components also seem a notch above Forbidden Alchemy - Wizards are a really cool monster and the new investigators are amazing.)
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Rauli Kettunen
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salty53 wrote:
Forbidden Alchemy had bugs, but its real problem was that two of the scenarios are just plain unfun. Even with the map and objective 1C fixed, I still have no desire to touch LiTaS ever again.


Do I recall correctly that you dislike Reanimator and LiTaS? If so, it's kind of funny that most of the bitching on the FFG MoM forum seems to be about how Yellow Matter should not be touched due to its suckiness.
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Roberta Yang
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Dam the Man wrote:
Do I recall correctly that you dislike Reanimator and LiTaS? If so, it's kind of funny that most of the bitching on the FFG MoM forum seems to be about how Yellow Matter should not be touched due to its suckiness.

wait what

why are these people saying wrong things

EDIT: In the first thread I found, the main complaint seemed to be objective 1B. Which, yes, is horrible and broken and unplayable. But having two functional objectives is, alas, above-average for Mansions of Madness, and tossing out the rest of the scenario, and actually rating it beneath the other FA scenarios (RotR doesn't even have three different objectives considering how samey they all are) on those grounds is a bit much.
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Rauli Kettunen
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http://www.fantasyflightgames.com/edge_foros_discusion.asp?e...
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Roberta Yang
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Are people really hailing "You find nothing because the item you're looking for isn't here yet [but maybe it will be here at some other time after the current time perhaps in some later year I wonder when that will be *WINK WINK*]" as the height of genius puzzles? I think my favorite time-puzzle is the Seeds, which aren't a puzzle at all since the investigator guide explicitly states exactly what they do and how to use them. (Though the acid that takes a hundred years to eat through a rock wins some points for silliness.)

It might have been worth playing once just for novelty... except it ran too long for the little it offered. I'm rather glad that recent scenarios (Yellow Sign, A Cry for Help) have been a bit shorter than older ones; I find Mansions is at its worst after it passes the two-hour mark.
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Could you guys explain how the ally conversations and keeper delusions mechanics work a bit more specifically? That's the part that really has me intrigued.
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Christopher Scatliff
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WakkaWakkatronic wrote:
Could you guys explain how the ally conversations and keeper delusions mechanics work a bit more specifically? That's the part that really has me intrigued.


No doubt. It was one of the most intriguing parts.

There's a new phase during the keeper turn. After the Investigator Trading step but before the Draw Threat step, there's a new Ally step. During the Ally step, each ally can be interacted with once. There are two types of interactions: conversation (you must be in the same space (or maybe room) as the ally) or attack (the closest investigator can choose for them to attack a monster in their space no matter how far away they are). There may be other things but those are the only two we were exposed to.

Attack is easy. Draw a card as normal and they either pass or fail their check based on whether the needed skill is one of their three areas of expertise or not.

For conversation, they each have their own deck of conversation cards. Each card is either a rumor or something else which eludes me (maybe event? story?). The events can be any number of things (pay something to learn a spell, a quest to go retrieve an item and bring it back, etc). Sometimes the events were necessary to acquire keys to locked rooms. The rumors were all flavor text, like the current clue cards, and generally pointed suspicion at one of the other allies. We were told that if you found three rumors pointing at the same ally then that would be enough to be certain of guilt. I assume that's something that gets done during setup to ensure that only one has three rumors pointing at them.

Of course, the keeper can mess this all up with delusion cards. They don't automatically get to draw delusion cards, that has to happen through some game effect. But once they get them, there was a keeper action to place the card on top of one of the conversation decks. The next person who talks to this ally has to take the delusion card. They have different backs,so you know it's a delusion, but there's no way to get around it. If you want to talk to that ally again ever, you just have to take it. Sometimes it's just babbling, sometimes they curse you, it's never anything helpful of course.

We didn't get to fully explore all the possibilities in the deck, of course, what with the Dunwich Horror showing up to eat us, but the mechanism showed a lot of potential. I'm looking forward to it.
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Roberta Yang
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There are actually three types of ally story cards: Rumors give information, Events make something happen, and Tasks give you a job to do.
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Christopher Scatliff
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salty53 wrote:
There are actually three types of ally story cards: Rumors give information, Events make something happen, and Tasks give you a job to do.

Right, the tasks. Yes, you silly old man, I'll get you a 2x4. Gah!
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Sebastian Grawan
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This expansion is getting better and better.
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Nersi Nikakhtar
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Agreed. I think the allies provided our session with its most interesting new component. The conversations (whether delusional or not) provided an interesting additional "story" component to the narrative of the game. The narrative is, for me, one of the main reasons we play Mansions of Madness, and having additional characters with a story to tell (and a mystery to solve) really enhanced that feeling.
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Mr. Doctor
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Smoo wrote:
salty53 wrote:
There are actually three types of ally story cards: Rumors give information, Events make something happen, and Tasks give you a job to do.

Right, the tasks. Yes, you silly old man, I'll get you a 2x4. Gah!

Out of interest, what do you mean by "a 2x4"?

Thanks in advance!
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