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Subject: Brawner's Farm rss

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Chris Rush
United States
Virginia
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With my parents visiting for Christmas, my dad and I were able to get a couple of games in and even finish our PBeM SPI Shiloh from Blue and Gray. I must admit my parents got us Battle Cry for Christmas ... one decade ago, and I had not played it with my dad until yesterday. Despite being a life-long gamer, it didn't take him too long to pick up on the rules of play (since it is fairly less complicated than the classic games upon which he grew in the '60s and '70s) but we started off with Brawner's Mill, primarily because it gives the players a lot of cards in hand and doesn't have too many obstructions for line of sight and die-rolling effects.

As with most Battle Cry games, the first few rounds were primarily about moving units up to the field of play and away from the back edge (more so in this scenario, since a good number of units being along both back edges of the board). Despite his inexperience with the game, my father's gaming pedigree showed through quickly (either that, or his multitude of Assault and Attack-type cards - the ones with multiple units attacking more often than simple probes or skirmishes), and he took an early 2-0 lead. I was able to get my generals in gear for a time and was suddenly laden with an abundance of Right Flank cards. I used these to send my cavalry against his rear artillery, and using the retreat flag I rolled sent his artillery off the board. After a while, I eliminated most of his Left Flank, since that was about all I could do - the majority of my Center Flank just sort of hanging out with nothing to do. Soon enough, we started exchanging victory flags to 4 each, which is where it stayed for a significant amount of time for the rest of the game.

By this time, I had a strong Right Flank unit pretty far into my dad's territory with a clear shot into the houses and behind the forests. My dad, however, conquered this quickly with a Short on Supplies card, sending the unit all the way back to my edge. My dad soon concentrated on his Right Flank (I would assume because of his cards), but that didn't do too much good, since I had used many of my Left Flank cards to move units to the Center (apparently believing an unstoppable barrage of Center Flank Assault cards were coming my way ... which didn't quite happen), and I took the opportunity of retreating behind the forest. My lone unit back by the house at the rear of my Left Flank eventually started an assault (since my Right Flank cards didn't do any good, I had lost my only cavalry shortly after eliminating his artillery, and my Center Flank wasn't doing anything, since he had kept most of his Center Flank in the rear).

It was at that time the dice started pretending to roll in my favor: that means I was eliminating most of his units with the exception of the flag bearer, who usually was able to retreat to safety behind a forest or a stronger unit of his. I kid you not, late in the game most of my dad's units were just flag bearers and a lone general (except for his solid Center units, doing nothing but lob the occasional shell). At this point, feeling I was in strong command of the game, I decided to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory, primarily by trying to be cute and try a Sharp Shooter to take out his general instead of just attacking with my infantry and attached general. Of course the Sharp Shooter missed, and my dad responded with a Reinforcements, conjuring a cavalry out of the mists of Virginia. Soon his reinforcements joined his general and sent my unconquerable units fleeing for the Shenandoahs.

His attacks shifted to the Center, but nothing came of it except whittling down some of my units. The cards returned to my favor, and, having learned my lesson about overconfidence, I decided to finish what was started on my Left Flank. My lonely rear guard got close enough to one of his flag-bearer only units and barely got him among a slew of wasted retreat flags. My dad's Center campaign continued to no effect, except to drive my front units back, but I naturally followed that up with forcing his flag-bearer only units back to safety, using my impressive ability to roll artillery sides against infantry. I finally got some Center cards and naturally positioned my own units to block the line of sight of my stronger artillery. Not much later, though, I was able to bombard another flag-only unit to smithereens, ending the game at 6-4. It was a good game and way past due.
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Jeffrey Nolin
Japan
Nakamachi, Hiroshima
Hiroshima-ken
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[q="Uncas007"] Despite being a life-long gamer, it didn't take him too long to pick up on the rules of play (since it is fairly less complicated than the classic games upon which he grew in the '60s and '70s) [/iq]

Eh, that makes no sense. Don't you mean, "Being a life-long gamer, it didn't take him long...." or do you mean to infer that gaming has been detrimental to your father's mental capabilities?
 
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Dale Hurtt
United States
Huachuca City
Arizona
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Games in the 70s had quite complex rules and loaded with charts and could take some time to pick up. So I understand the statement that despite a steady diet of such games that he could pick up these quite easily.
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Chris Rush
United States
Virginia
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longagoigo wrote:
[q="Uncas007"] Despite being a life-long gamer


The "despite" part refers to the end of the sentence, in that we started with a basic scenario with not much territory - his gaming experience certainly wasn't a problem. This could have been written more clearly; I admit that.
 
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