jflartner
United States
Wayne
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Poll
I have heard two separate reviewers pronounce Crusoe differently than how I pronounce it. How do you pronounce it?

I find regional dialects interesting - if you live in the US, post what state you live in, and which choice fits you.
1. With how many syllables do you, personally, pronounce Robinson's last name?
Two syllables (kroo-sō)
Three syllables (ka-roo-sō)
2. Which syllable is stressed?
I pronounce Crusoe with two syllables and stress the FIRST syllable.
I pronounce Crusoe with two syllables and stress the SECOND syllable.
I pronounce Crusoe with three syllables and stress the FIRST syllable.
I pronounce Crusoe with three syllables and stress the SECOND syllable.
I pronounce Crusoe with three syllables and stress the THIRD syllable.
      132 answers
Poll created by jobin13
 
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Lee Fisher
United States
Downingtown
PA
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Was the reviewer in question one who mispronounces many things?
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-=::) Dante (::=-
United States
KEW GARDENS
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Dialect schmialect. Anyone pronouncing it with three syllables is simply wrong. (and the same goes with an emphasis on anything other than the first syllable)
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Matt Sanders
United Kingdom
Shrewsbury
Shropshire
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It's pronounced Krew-so-ay ... check with Christophe Boelinger if you don't believe me

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This is very interesting.
Although I support NuMystics claim, regarding contemporary pronunciation, I am a bit less sure about how the name was pronounced at the time the book was written.
Especially, since the name shares a lot of similarities to the author's name, which is decidedly spoken with a stressed second syllable.
 
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Wiet van Bragt
Netherlands
Tilburg
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In the Netherlands we also say 'krew-so-ay'!
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Andy Tinkham
United States
Shoreview
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I'm in the US. Live in Minnesota now, grew up in New Hampshire, and I've been told I sound like a Californian in terms of accent (for the record, I neither pronounce "here" as "he-ah" nor do I pahk my cah in Hahvahd Yahd), for what that's worth. For me, it's two syllables, with the emphasis on the first one.
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Ryan Full
United States
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Three for me with emphasis on the second.
 
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Wiet van Bragt
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When you guys say three syllables, do you mean Ka-roo-so? Is there no one in the USA that says krew-so-ay?
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KC Bagley
United States
Orem
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Before I read this post I had no idea there were two ways people pronounce it (or 3 for that matter). Never paid attention. Now that I've read the two ways, I can't for the life of me figure out which way I say it. I keep saying it out loud, but they both sound familiar. I probably look like an idiot too (as my wife looks over at me puzzled). Anyhow, I am now switching to 'krew-so-ay'.
 
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Ryan Full
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Wiet wrote:
When you guys say three syllables, do you mean Ka-roo-so? Is there no one in the USA that says krew-so-ay?


When I say three syllables I say it like ka-ROO-so.

Emphasis on the ROO.
 
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-=::) Dante (::=-
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Wiet wrote:
Is there no one in the USA that says krew-so-ay?


That wouldn't be likely with any native English speaker as the only words in English where e is pronounced as a "long a" like that are actually foreign words that have come into common usage. (paté or resumé being examples of that)
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NuMystic wrote:
Dialect schmialect. Anyone pronouncing it with three syllables is simply wrong. (and the same goes with an emphasis on anything other than the first syllable)

Seriously, folks, a poll on a boardgame site is not your best resource when researching factual matters that go beyond gaming. Thank goodness for people like NuMystic, who have the good sense to look up actual references and get a real answer rather than relying on uninformed opinions.
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jflartner
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Sphere wrote:
NuMystic wrote:
Dialect schmialect. Anyone pronouncing it with three syllables is simply wrong. (and the same goes with an emphasis on anything other than the first syllable)

Seriously, folks, a poll on a boardgame site is not your best resource when researching factual matters that go beyond gaming. Thank goodness for people like NuMystic, who have the good sense to look up actual references and get a real answer rather than relying on uninformed opinions.


hide your kids, hide your wife...
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jobin13 wrote:
hide your kids, hide your wife...

It isn't that bad, but when I see people saying they're going to change to a three syllable pronunciation because that's how somebody says it in the Netherlands, I figure a warning label is warranted.
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...especially since it has been pointed out what the correct pronunciation would be.
Be the variety of accents and dialects as they may, there actually is a correct pronunciation! And it is not what the majority does that is the important thing here...
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Wiet van Bragt
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Sphere wrote:
I figure a warning label is warranted.

yuk
No need to climb your high horse... It seems to me this is nothing more than a very interesting discussion about pronunciation in different parts of the world.

I think the Dutch krew-so-ay came to the Netherlands via France. I found a Dutch translation of the book here and as you can make out from the cover pic there's a ë there. This is how I remember this story from back in the day. Not every Dutch translation has this though! I understand the original English pronunciation is krewsow, and that makes sense. Interesting to see how these (erroneous) variations come about!

[edited for spelling]
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Robert Masson
United States
West Lafayette
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I pronounce it

.-. --- -... .. -. ... --- -. / -.-. .-. ..- ... --- .

and

01010010 01101111 01100010 01101001 01101110 01110011 01101111 01101110 0100000 01000011 01110010 01110101 01110011 01101111 01100101
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Wiet wrote:
Sphere wrote:
I figure a warning label is warranted.

yuk
No need to climb your high horse... It seems to me this is nothing more than a very interesting discussion about pronunciation in different parts of the world.

You've seen my horse? He only gets high on special occasions.
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Wiet van Bragt
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Sphere wrote:
You've seen my horse? He only gets high on special occasions.

It looks like besides how to pronounce them this thread is now also about how to choose your words carefully...
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KC Bagley
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Sphere wrote:
jobin13 wrote:
hide your kids, hide your wife...

It isn't that bad, but when I see people saying they're going to change to a three syllable pronunciation because that's how somebody says it in the Netherlands, I figure a warning label is warranted.


Wrong, not switching because that's how they say it in Netherlands, but because I like how it sounds. Besides, you really think I'm going to switch? Also, look at NuMystic's 3 links posted earlier. if you scroll down the page on the second one there is a play button to listen to the French version of the word. . . krew-so-ay. Just because other countries pronounce something different doesn't make it wrong. Now in the original post of how Amerikanskiis have two different ways, one is clearly correct while the other is just how some people grew up saying it. Which I also see nothing wrong with that.
 
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To once again repeat myself...
...there is nothing wrong with pronouncing a name differently.

However, if you look for the right pronunciation of the name, there is only one correct answer. We cannot go back in time and ask Mr. Defoe what that would be, or how he would have pronounced it, but we can narrow it down quite a bit. Thereby excluding unlikely versions.

Three-syllable-versions are, therefore, not wrong in them being used, but wrong if you state them to be the right pronunciation. As to first-syllable stess or second-syllable stress, this has not been debated here directly. My opinion is that, the name being constructed similar to the name of the author, a second-syllable stress could have very well been likely at the time of writing.
However, the standard pronunciation of the author's country is the first-syllable stress. Additionally, I am not a linguist, even if being familiar with the subject to some degree, so I cannot fully support my suggestion with fact...

...and I am way to lazy and busy to look for the answer...
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Marc D
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I would pronounce it Croo-so. DeFoe was English, and I suppose he would have pronounced it that way, too. The protagonist is also English, and in the first paragraph of the book he tells the reader that his name is an anglicized version of a German name (his father, from Bremen, had the surname Kreutznaer):

"I WAS born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not of that country, my father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull. He got a good estate by merchandise, and leaving off his trade, lived afterwards at York, from whence he had married my mother, whose relations were named Robinson, a very good family in that country, and from whom I was called Robinson Kreutznaer; but by the usual corruption of words in England, we are now called - nay we call ourselves and write our name - Crusoe; and so my companions always called me." page 1.

So, I don't remember what a York accent sounds like, and I have never met anyone who lived in York in the 1600's so I doubt that the way I say Crusoe is similar to what would have been said back then. However, it seems clear that it would have been a two syllable pronunciation.

But, really, doesn't matter much. I'm just procrastinating and all this typing sure makes it look like I'm doing some serious work!
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jflartner
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kcBagz wrote:
Now in the original post of how American's have two different ways, one is clearly correct while the other is just how some people grew up saying it.


First, I have to disagree with your wording here. One way of pronouncing it is "correct"? So the way "some people grew up saying it," is what? Wrong? What a boring and limited view of language.

Second, "Americans," in your sentence doesn't need the apostrophe because it isn't possessive. Now THAT was clearly wrong.
 
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-=::) Dante (::=-
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jobin13 wrote:
kcBagz wrote:
Now in the original post of how American's have two different ways, one is clearly correct while the other is just how some people grew up saying it.


First, I have to disagree with your wording here. One way of pronouncing it is "correct"? So the way "some people grew up saying it," is what? Wrong? What a boring and limited view of language.

Second, "Americans," in your sentence doesn't need the apostrophe because it isn't possessive. Now THAT was clearly wrong.


Wait, so you're willing to acknowledge that there are rules of grammar which dictate what is right and wrong when it comes to written language, but pronunciation is free of all such restraints? What a selectively biased perspective that is.

Obviously there are dialects, accents, and in many cases multiple correct ways to say something. Furthermore, with language being a living thing it's not uncommon for the wrong way for something to be said AND spelled to eventually gain admission into both the dictionaries and grammar guides.

But, until that does happen there most certainly is a right and wrong way to pronounce most things in every language. Now, I'm personally not one who feels it warrants disdain and correction at every turn when someone strays, but implying that such conventions don't even really exist and that acknowledging them is simply being narrow and "boring" is without merit.

Doesn't matter whether you grew up pronouncing "ask" as "axe", or whether all your neighborhood buddies do the same, it's still wrong grammatically.

Perhaps I'll just take up pronouncing and spelling your name Mr. Phlegmy, and if corrected I'll point out what a boring and limited view of language you have. laugh
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