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To submit news, a designer diary, outrageous rumors, or other material, please contact BGG News editor W. Eric Martin via email – wericmartin AT gmail.com

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New Game Round-up: Meet Roland Wright, Welcome the Carnies, and Explore the World of Pandemic Legacy: Season 2

W. Eric Martin
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• We will know that "roll and write" games — designs in which players roll dice, then write something in response — have made it big when a character emerges from the mists to don the name and claim it as their own, and that day has come with the announcement of a "new line of premium roll and write games" from Chris Handy of Perplext. This line of games is based on Roland Wright, "a fictional game designer who is obsessed with making great roll and write games in his 'old time' workshop", says Handy. "He's like a Willy Wonka meets Reiner Knizia."

The series will launch with 3-4 games in 2018, with the first title being Roland Wright: A Pursuit of the Perfect Dice Game. In the game, players select dice each turn to complete game design modules and earn equipment in order to create the "perfect dice game".

Z-Man Games has finally officially announced Pandemic Legacy: Season 2, a standalone game from Matt Leacock and Rob Daviau that throws you seventy years into the future past the events of Season 1. Here's a summary of the game's setting:

Quote:
Humanity has been brought to its knees. A network of the last known cities persists, supplied by the "havens", isolated stations floating in the ocean far from the plague. Three generations of survivors have called the havens home. Most of them have never set foot on the mainland. But now supplies are running low and the people have turned to you to lead. It is up to you to save what remaining cities you can and stop the world from ending for good.

The main twist in the game is that instead of removing disease cubes from the board, you're now delivering supplies to the few cities that you can reach, trying to expand that network of locations over time, but limited in your travel to movement by ships or what you can reach over land as air travel is no longer possible. Check the post for more details, with the game due out in Q4 2017 and available for a sneak peek at Gen Con 2017 in August.

• Uli Blennemann of Spielworxx has opened preorders for Stefan Risthaus' Gentes, with the game shipping in July 2017. Gentes is a civilization game in which you can't get everything you need as the more that you focus on one type of worker, the fewer you can have of another. Full rules can be downloaded in English and German from the Spielworxx website, or you watch an overview video that BGG recorded at the Spielwarenmesse toy fair in early 2017. As is usual with Spielworxx titles, only one thousand copies are being produced.

• French publisher Bombyx has renamed their SPIEL 2017 release from Bruno Cathala and Florian Sirieix yet again, with the one-time Curiosity and later named Steamers now bearing the name of Imaginarium. We recorded an overview of this game in early 2017, and the gameplay remains the same, as far as I know.)

Here's a shot of prototype copies made for the Paris Est Ludique game fair in mid-June 2017:




• Belgian publisher Pearl Games has posted a teaser video on Facebook for The Carnies, an expansion for Nicolas Robert's The Bloody Inn that will be released at SPIEL 2017 in October.

In addition to this expansion, at SPIEL 2017 Pearl Games will release Claude Lucchini's Otys (a co-publication with Libellud for which we shot an overview video while at the Cannes game fair in February 2017) and the space game Black Angel, for which there's an overview video of the prototype in French and this image of the prototype.

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Origins Game Fair 2017 I: Czech Games Edition — Codenames Duet, That's a Question!, and Pulsar 2849

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Thanks to the efficient editing efforts of Nikki Pontius of BGG's own GameNight!, I can start posting game demonstrations and overviews recorded in the BGG booth during the 2017 Origins Game Fair less than week after that show ended. Kudos, Nikki!

• We'll start with a trio of titles coming from Czech Games Edition, with the first two of those titles — Codenames Duet and That's a Question! — scheduled to debut at Gen Con 2017 in August.

Codenames Duet is, as far as I can tell, the second title that lists Vlaada Chvátil as a co-designer (with Star Trek: Frontiers being the first). My understanding is that Scot Eaton approached CGE with the basic design for this two-player take on the Spiel des Jahres-winning Codenames, and CGE has been developing it non-stop ever since. The version of the game that I played at PAX East in mid-March 2017 differed from the original submission, and that version differed from what I saw one week later at the GAMA Trade Show, and that differed from what I saw at the Gathering in April, and so on. CGE has a great reputation for its designs, and seeing that development work in action helps you understand why they have the reputation that they do.





That's a Question! is another party game from Chvátil, his take on the well-known "guess how someone will answer a question" genre. In this design players get to create their own questions using the hexagonal topic cards in hand, with the goal of trying to split the party in their answers.

I had asked someone at CGE about Chvátil's most recent designs all being party games, and they mentioned that he has children now, so he's been leaning toward shorter games that allow for quicker iteration and development. That isn't to say that Chvátil is done with larger and longer games, but given the strength of Codenames and how much fun this game has been to observe (as all I've done is observe it so far), this change of focus isn't necessarily a loss.





• The final title previewed by CGE is Pulsar 2849, a dice-drafting, space exploration game from designer Vladimír Suchý (Last Will) that will debut at SPIEL 2017 in October. The design is still in development right now, but Josh Githens demonstrates the basics of game, the basics of the tech trees (plural, with each player having an individual tree and all players sharing a different tree), how you explore the stars, and more.

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Sun Jun 25, 2017 5:26 pm
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New Game Round-up: Imhotep Welcomes the Gods, Agra Prepares for a Birthday, and Canada Awaits Exploitation in Okanagan: Valley of the Lakes

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• Admittedly with Gen Con 2017 being the next major convention in the offing, much of the gaming news popping up relates to that show, but SPIEL 2017 looms even larger ahead of its October 26 opening, and publishers are popping out announcements for that show as well, such as Matagot's opening teaser for Okanagan: Valley of the Lakes, a 2-4 player game from Emanuele Ornella that bears this short description:

Quote:
Canada's wealth is waiting for you!

The Okanagan Valley, with its huge lakes and fertile meadows, awaits anyone willing to exploit it. Shape the land and store your wealth in the gathering and territory-building game Okanagan: Valley of the Lakes. In the game, players arrange tiles to design the landscape along with its natural resources — and it's your job to place one of the three buildings to obtain and secure these resources so that you can complete your objectives.

• A second title coming from Matagot at SPIEL 2017 is Cédric Millet's Meeple Circus, which was first announced in early 2016. The description gives you enough details to start imagining how it might play:

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You have only one goal in Meeple Circus: Entertain the audience. The competition is tough, but you can create the most amazing circus by proposing incredible acts! Acrobats, horses, and many accessories are at your disposal. Be sure to undertake a good rehearsal, then with your remarkable dexterity, you can give them the show of their lifetime. Once the circus music starts, all eyes will be upon you!

In short, Meeple Circus is a dexterity game in which you do what all gamers do when setting up a game: Pile up your meeples!



• Dutch publisher Quined Games has a new title coming in Q4 2017 from Michael Keller of La Granja fame with Agra being a 90-120-minute game for 2-4 players. Quined has included a decent amount of background in its description to put the game in context:

Quote:
Agra, India: The year is 1572; this year marks the 30th birthday of Abu'l-Fath Jalal-ud-din Muhammad, popularly known as Akbar the Great. Akbar is the third ruler of India's Mughal dynasty, having succeeded his father, Humayun. With the guidance of his regent, Bairam Khan, Akbar has expanded and consolidated India's Mughal domains. Using his strong personality and skill as a general, Akbar has enlarged his Empire to include nearly all of the Indian subcontinent north of the Godavari River; his presence is felt across the entire country due to the Mughals' military, political, cultural, and economic dominance.

To unify the vast Mughal state, Akbar has established a centralized system of administration; conquered rulers are conciliated through marriage and diplomacy. Akbar has preserved peace and Order throughout his empire by passing laws that have won him the support of his non-Muslim subjects. Eschewing tribal bonds and Islamic state-identity, Akbar has striven to unite his lands. The Mughals' Persian-ized culture has afforded Akbar near-divine status.

Notables and emissaries from all over the country are on their way for Akbar's birthday celebration. As an ambitious landowner, you cannot let this pass; the festivities are a golden opportunity for you to rise in stature and wealth.

On your land in Agra, you cultivate and harvest cotton and turmeric. You possess a forest from which you produce wood, as well as a small, but very profitable sandstone quarry. By trading and processing your wares, you can obtain more luxurious goods, which you will then use to woo notables as they make their way into the capital. Of course, your rivals have the same plan; you must use your wits to outsmart them as Akbar's birthday draws near...

• Designer Phil Walker-Harding and German publisher KOSMOS have an expansion shipping in October for their Spiel des Jahres-nominated Imhotep with Imhotep: Eine neue Dynastie consisting of five new places, fourteen market cards, seven god cards, four chariots, and 56 tiles. One detail about what's new in this expansion: "God cards let players predict the progress of different buildings, with them being rewarded at the end of the game if they're correct and otherwise being punished."

Adellos is a self-published game from newcomer Till Engel that he's currently funding on German crowdfunding site Startnext for an anticipated debut at SPIEL 2017. Here's a description from the designer:

Quote:
Adellos is a turn-based tactical strategy board game for 2-4 players. Each player controls a medieval nobleman, who hires various units (soldiers, riders, thugs, etc.) and tries to overcome the other players. The players have twelve different units with unique skills to choose and control. They also have to manage their gold income and the flow of action cards that each player can use on their turn for effects that influence the game. Everything takes place on a symmetric battle map. Every nobleman has a specific and unique skill that can influence the game from the start.

Turns are played in two phases. During the first phase, players gain the resources their units provide. In the second phase, players hire units, move, attack, or play action cards. Every action costs a specific number of action points. The players start with three action points and an amount of gold, depending on their position. Players can increase their action points throughout the game to build up huge turns.
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Sat Jun 24, 2017 1:05 pm
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New Game Round-up: Get Buffed for Summer, Fold to Attack Others, and Assemble Your Feline Forces

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• After a week of the 2017 Origins Game Fair plus a few extra sick days, I have a lot to catch up on, starting with the revelation that Legendary: Buffy the Vampire Slayer, a deck-building game from Travis R. Chance and Nick Little that will debut from Upper Deck Entertainment at Gen Con 2017, will use photographic images from the television show and not original artwork — at least that's what I think is happening as the solicitation for the game from UDE features the cards depicted below, despite touting that the game features "All Original Art". Checking on this...

Update, June 23: The "All Original Art" phrase was possibly a holdover from an earlier solicitation, according to UDE gaming sales manager Richard Dracass, who confirmed that Legendary: Buffy "and future TV properties" will "use screen grabs from the show as this is how fans relate to those brands".





• At SPIEL 2016, Korean publisher Happy Baobab released Fold-it by Yohan Goh, a real-time, pattern-creation game in which each player has a double-sided cloth and races to fold that cloth in a particular way to reveal only the dishes shown on that round's menu card. The game is a tricky take on the Spot it genre because spotting the images that you need to feature isn't enough; you need to also figure out how to make all the other images disappear within the folds of the cloth.

Two things have happened since that release: First, publisher ThinkFun has licensed the game for release in the U.S., with a listed street date of July 21, 2017. (Hong Kong-based Broadway Toys has also licensed the game for a Chinese-language edition.)

Second, at SPIEL 2017 Happy Baobab will release Battlefold, a new take on the system with co-designer Dave Choi and art by Vincent Dutrait. Says publisher representative Kevin Kim, "Originally, we had planned to make a Fold-it series of games with different artwork and puzzles, but the same game rules. However, after the successful launch in Essen, we changed the main direction of the project. We found the potential of the 'folding handkerchief' system and decided to make very different games while keeping only the folding handkerchief to show certain icons." Here's an overview of this new game:

Quote:
In Battlefold, each player takes on the role of a warrior, assassin, magician, or archer. The player takes the handkerchief matching their character, with each handkerchief providing different fighting powers. The warrior, for example, has a cross-shaped attack range and is more powerful when staying in the same position, while the archer has a long-distance attack and more movement.

As in the earlier game Fold-it, once a mission card is revealed, players must fold their handkerchief to leave visible only the right combination of symbols. After successfully making a combination, the player takes the lowest remaining turn order token. Starting with the first player, each player controls their character on the arena board, moving and fighting with the goal of being the last one standing. If a player defeats all other opponents, they win!

Battlefold is a player-elimination game, but eliminated players can still participate via the "ghost" rule. When a player's character dies, the character becomes a ghost. Flip the character board to the ghost side and keep playing. A ghost player can gain spiritual energy by successfully attacking living characters, and if a ghost collects full spiritual energy before only one living character remains in the arena, then the ghost wins the game.



IELLO has released an overview of Sentai Cats, the details of which sound as ridiculous as the name. The design, which hits brick-and-mortar stores on September 28, 2017, is credited to "Tokyo Boys", probably because they didn't want to fit all the designer names (Antoine Bauza, Corentin Lebrat, Ludovic Maublanc, Nicolas Oury, Théo Rivière) on their miniature box. Here's the setting:

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You were living the easy life as a kitten, enjoying the best food in the town. Out of the blue, Meka Dog arrived and threatened to destroy the catnip factory — but no one messes with a kitty's food bowl! Train your cats and be the fastest one to transform them into Sentai Cats. Only the best team of Sentai Cats will have the honor of facing Meka Dog in the ultimate combat.

Sentai Cats is a fast-paced and quirky game in which you train your cute little kitties into world-saving heroes...wearing latex suits!

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Fri Jun 23, 2017 3:17 pm
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Word Slamming My Way Through Origins 2017

W. Eric Martin
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My apologies for the quietness in this space since the end of the 2017 Origins Game Fair, which corresponded with the launching of the Gen Con 2017 Preview, but in the past three days I've eaten only a banana, a piece of toast, a handful of cereal, a can of soup (over two days), a handful of chips, and two bowls of blueberries — this after ending my Origins with the eating, followed by the rapid uneating, of a turkey BLT (botulism-laden-terrorwich).

I had hoped to jump immediately into Gen Con preview updates once Origins ended as I knew that my inbox would be flooded with messages from publishers who having now cleared the hurdles in Columbus could set their sights on the next obstacle ahead in Indianapolis, and lo, that flood did miraculously appear to test the gates of my Gmail dam, but I couldn't manage to do more than sit upright every so often and admire the light reflecting on the surface on my unusually untouched laptop. Now that I'm finally up again, I'll start draining the backlog, but let's start with something simpler: a recap of my Origins 2017 experience:




There you go. Word Slam. Origins recapped!

BGG's Scott Alden and Lincoln Damerst had raved about Inka and Markus Brand's Word Slam after seeing it demonstrated on camera in the BGG booth at SPIEL 2016, and when Thames & Kosmos donated an English-language copy to the BGG library for BGG.CON 2017 Spring in late May, Scott started playing it obsessively — yet somehow I caught only his simultaneously active Kreus obsession during that show. (More on that game another day.)

At Origins 2017, Scott asked, "You haven't played Word Slam yet? Oh, man, you have to." So we played the game on air once we finished the scheduled game demonstrations on Wednesday. Then he brought it to the Nerd Nighters fundraising event on Thursday, and I joined in after it had already been on the table an hour to play for three more hours, with people coming and going constantly as they often do with Codenames and Concept. We played again on camera on Friday; we talked about the game on Lone Shark Live: Origins by Night, a three-night podcast from Origins hosted by Mike Selinker, Paul Peterson, and James Ernest; we played on dinky tables on Saturday night with people once again coming and going; and we played yet again on Sunday night, with me leaving the table only because my sandwich has different plans for its future than I had intended.



Erin Dontknowherlastname, Paul Grogan, Mike Selinker, Scott Alden, Josh Githens, Chad Krizan


For those who don't know the game, Word Slam is played in teams, with the members of each team trying to guess the same hidden noun phrase. One member on each team knows this noun phrase — which can be anything from butterfly to mountain to the Golden Gate Bridge to Forrest Gump — and to get their teammates to guess it, they can use only a set of one hundred words that is provided to each team. Words are color-coded as nouns, adjectives, verbs, and other, and you can place words on your rack, point at words on your rack, move words around on your rack, take words off the rack, and otherwise do some combination of "word" VERB "rack" as long as you don't animate the cards to give clues. Those guessing must yell out answers so that their guesses can be heard by the other team, which is a secondary form of clue and something that your cluegiver might be able to take advantage of.

I think the rules specify that you keep the words in piles, but we often played otherwise, spreading them out in order to view everything at once, with word combinations popping out at me like strands of the Matrix being read by Neo. (New players can find this approach overwhelming and should be presented with stacks of cards as recommended so that they're not hit in the eyes with one hundred words at once. Even experienced players might prefer this approach if they don't like scanning the way that most of us did.)

As with the previously mentioned Concept, the beauty of Word Slam is the (restricted) openness available to players when trying to convey some idea to others. You don't have the freedom to do anything, but you have the freedom to do hundreds of different things. You have tools spread out on the table, and you try to make them work as well as you can. Sometimes you find a magic tool that unlocks understanding in a second — as when someone put up the single word "run" and someone else answered "Forrest Gump" — sometimes you create a word poem that does the trick (with "big" "up" "place" being correctly interpreted as "mountain"), and sometimes you labor at something forever, the clarity of the concept in your mind somehow not transmitting itself across the aether into theirs. I tend to tell stories with my clues, and my concept for "lawyer" took a while, with me moving around cards constantly, but finally getting across the notion of an event happening, then someone speaking the opposite of what happened.




Yes, that's a stereotype, but Word Slam invites you to take advantage of those stereotypes while also frustrating you with them at the same time. The game doesn't include a card for "person", for example — only cards for "man", "woman", and "child" — so any time you use "man" or "woman" in a clue, you risk misleading the guessers who might think that gender plays a role in the answer when it doesn't.

The frustration comes in many flavors: Sometimes you remove words from the rack because it turns out they were misleading, but sometimes you want to remove words from the rack because you needed them only to get guessers thinking along a certain line. Scott, for example, struggled with a word for a while until he finally had us guess Italy by clueing "country" "red" "food", after which he removed those words to work on the actual answer, which was something that originated in Italy. Will guessers understand why you removed those words? Maybe! Play with someone for a few hours, though, and you get a real sense of their clue-giving style.

Cheating comes into play because it's hard to fight human nature. You're not supposed to point to guessers when they say something close or dismiss a guess by waving your hand, but sometimes you can't help yourself. I was clueing "Golden Gate Bridge" with something like "vehicle on long red object" and circling "long red object" with my fingers to indicate that was the vital part of the clue when someone on my team shouted out "San Francisco". I jerked in response because those two things are so closely associated (and I lived in SF years ago, so something triggered there, too, I think), and while that answer wasn't correct, my response indicated that the person was close and they got "Golden Gate Bridge" almost immediately. Whoops. Thankfully we were not in the world finals of the Word Slam competition and were content to just move on to the next game.

Quote:
An interlude: In many ways, Word Slam is identical to Geoff Girouard's self-published game Word Blur from 2007: Two people race to get their teammates to guess a hidden noun phrase using only combinations of single words. Where the games differ are relevant to how fun they are. In Word Slam, everything is on a card, and you move them around freely to express your ideas; Word Blur includes a modifier strip for each team that includes things like "er", "opposite/not", "ing", and "sounds like", but in practice using this strip prohibits you from arranging the words the way that you want while also stripping away some of the difficulty.

The bigger issue is that each team in Word Slam has the same one hundred words. That's it! If you know Mark Rosewater's credo — "restrictions breed creativity" — this game embodies that spirit. All the words are basic and require your input (and the input of your guessers) to make something of them. Word Blur presents you with nine hundred individual words on pieces of cardstock that resemble refrigerator magnets. To play, you dump everything in the middle of the table, then the cluegivers start sifting through the rubble to find things they can use. This is not fun. To quote from a 2008 review by Neil Edge that I had published on BoardgameNews.com, "If a person isn't totally on board with the idea of this game, he can bring the game to a halt or slow it down to a snail's pace as he just slowly sifts and sifts and sifts and sifts through the tile pile, never finding words that make connections to the clue that he's trying to give, never looking for alternatives."




I played Word Blur three times between 2007 and 2010, when the game went out of print, and our group referred to it as "The Game of Sifting" because that's all it felt like you were doing. Sifting through tons of useless options with an increasingly desperate feeling that surely you can find something that works. Word Slam has none of that boredom because you have few options and everything is at hand to both parties. Me finding "water" doesn't prevent you from playing "water" as well, and the game is all about speed and creativity instead of who found the perfect word. I can't just find the word "Spain" (as shown in the image above) to lead you to bullfighter, but rather I'd have to first figure out how to get your mind to Spain — or just do something else. Those multiple steps, as described above for Italy, contribute to the escalating tension in Word Slam, with you feeling a little victory when your teammates guess something like that and you can build on it to something else.

In short, Word Slam seems like what Word Blur could have been if it had gone through a strong development process to bring forward the best elements of the idea.

Where Word Slam differs from Concept, and what gives it a leg up on that design, is that you compete against another team, so instead of simply being a fun activity that continues for hours, you do have a sense of winning and losing — even if you don't keep score, which we never did. One team wins, yay!, then the cluegivers give up their spots to someone else (or they don't), and you go again. The game includes easy, medium, hard, and ridiculously hard noun phrases to guess, with six noun phrases on each card. Over time you will run into repeats; Scott had already cycled through the cards enough that he encountered repeats, and if he was guessing, he could sometimes jump to the answer because he had heard it before. If he was giving the clues, he might reject one noun phrase and suggest that the other cluegiver choose another number from 1 to 6 since he would have an advantage on how to clue it. (If you know the one hundred words well, you'll still have an advantage on newcomers, but no sense compounding those advantages!)

I played one or two other games during the 2017 Origins Game Fair, but given that I played Word Slam for 7-8 hours and would have played it even more if possible, it's easy to see what my game of the show is!

Oh, and I also saw this lady at Origins: Best costume ev-AR!


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Thu Jun 22, 2017 4:17 pm
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Gen Con 2017 Preview Now Live

W. Eric Martin
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The 2017 Origins Game Fair is over, so it's time to look ahead to Gen Con 2017, which takes place August 17-20 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

I'd say more about one or both of these shows, or the rate at which titles will be added to the Gen Con 2017 Preview over the next two months (which starts at 146 titles while the previous two years had about 550 on them), but I got sick at the end of Origins — bad sandwich, I think — and can barely think straight, so just have at it!
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Mon Jun 19, 2017 6:54 pm
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New Game Round-up: Raiders in North America, Antiquity Anew, and Doomtown: ReReloaded

W. Eric Martin
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I'm in Columbus, Ohio to cover the 2017 Origins Game Fair, with five days of live game demos and interviews starting Wednesday, June 14, but before we get to that, let's round up a few announcements that I've possibly tweeted in passing but not posted here.

• To start with, Renegade Game Studios has signed a deal with Shem Phillips of Garphill Games to make his 2017 Kennerspiel des Jahres-nominated title Raiders of the North Sea and its expansions available in English on a more widespread basis. Renegade expects to have the base game available in Q3 2017 with the expansions to follow in Q4.

• In other Renegade news, the publisher is creating a "Play Renegade" kit for Clank! A Deck-Building Adventure to encourage game store owners to run events to demo the game, with participants taking home an as-yet-undisclosed promo card and the winner of the event getting a special version of this card. These promos will also be available at conventions in mid-2017, with "a unique, handcrafted dragon trophy" for the overall player with the highest score.

• Dutch publisher Splotter Spellen is reprinting its 2004 title Antiquity that has gone in and out of print multiple times over the years, and it's taking preorders on its website with this new edition due out for SPIEL 2017 in October. This new edition has a few small changes to it — deeper box, shaped wooden tokens that aren't only cubes — but gameplay remains the same.

• Designer Joseph Fatula has started taking preorders for the Sept. 1, 2017 release of Leaving Earth: Stations, an expansion for his Leaving Earth game from The Lumenaris Group, Inc. that adds the Space Shuttle, various space station modules, and new missions to this game.

• The expandable card game Doomtown: Reloaded, which was born from the collectible card game Deadlands: Doomtown in 2014 and which publisher Alderac Entertainment Group cancelled in 2016, is being born again courtesy of Pine Box Entertainment, which is partnering with Pinnacle Entertainment Group to release the "Epitaph Series", a series of tournaments that will coincide with the release of Tales from the Epitaph, a new expansion for the game.

• At SPIEL 2017, Cranio Creations will release Houses of Renaissance, an expansion for Lorenzo il Magnifico in which each player becomes the head of a house, with each of the ten houses having a unique power. Components for a fifth player are included, as well as new development and leader cards.
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Wed Jun 14, 2017 6:25 am
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Designer Diary: Stroop, or Coaxing a Game out of an Established Phenomenon

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Some things are far more obvious in retrospect. Such is the design of Stroop, a speedy perception card game with simple rules.

Psychological Origins

I can't remember exactly when I first saw a Stroop test. I feel like it was the kind of thing I would have encountered in a GAMES Magazine issue pilfered from my mom's bedside stand. I do recall being delighted by the idea and making flashcards with markers and note cards to test myself and my friends. Throughout the following years I saw it referenced time and again, most notably in the briefly-popular Brain Age game for the Nintendo DS.

The Stroop test is simple. A subject is presented with a series of words, each printed in a different color. The subject is then asked to quickly speak aloud the names of the colors in which the words are printed, and they are timed during this task.




Next, the subject repeats this task, but this time the words are the names of colors, instead of being random words.




This causes the subject to stumble and take longer to complete the task. The experiment demonstrates the Stroop effect, named after psychologist John Ridley Stroop, and shows that the interference between different systems in the brain — in this case, language and color recognition — can slow down both systems.

From Experiment to Game

Flash forward to 2013 when I was in the midst of brainstorming ideas for new tabletop games to develop, and I randomly stumbled across the Wikipedia page for the Stroop effect. This led to the immediate question: Could this be a game?

Now Brain Age had used the Stroop effect in its simplest and most obvious form. It was not really a game, but rather an activity at which you could improve; you were timed on how quickly you responded to the colors and given a score that you tried to improve upon the next time.

The clear way to transform this into a card game was to do exactly the same, but with multiple players. I would print the names of colors onto cards, with ink colors that didn't match. Then players would run through the deck like flashcards, saying the colors out loud and being timed on their effort.

Even before physically prototyping this, it was instantly an unsatisfying implementation. For one thing, a speed contest such as this is usually uninteresting. It is a solo experience that people happen to compare their efforts on, which is something I can enjoy at times but rarely gravitate toward.

But the bigger problem is that the Stroop test can be defeated. Once a subject knows what they are being asked to do, they can use techniques, like squinting, that make the words harder to read, which makes saying the names of the colors much easier. I certainly didn't want players to be able to circumvent the challenge in this way, or worse, to have to make rules against squinting!

Chain, Chain, Chain

The key to cracking this problem was, as is usually the case in design, to come up with the correct incentives for the behaviors I wanted. Need players to read the text and not just squint at blurry colors? Don't make a rule telling them to do read it. Instead, force them to use the text for something.

What purpose could reading the color name serve, then? The clear choice was to link the name of this color up to the color of another word. This forms a nice chain of words, each of which describes the next one.




Exploring Attributes

For the first Stroop prototype, I lifted wholesale the rules of 7 Ate 9, a speed game involving simple arithmetic. Players would race to get rid of their cards by playing onto a central pile, and legal plays consisted of any card that was described by the center one.

In broad strokes, this worked as a game, but it had some issues. The biggest one was the number of potential legal plays on a given card; with eight colors, as in my first prototype, one in eight cards are legal to play. This turned out to be far too small. Iteration revealed that anything smaller than about one in five cards being legal made the game grind to a halt. Shrinking the color space this much, though, made the deck homogeneous and uninteresting.

The solution to this was to introduce additional axes for card descriptors. Aside from color, what else could be used to describe these words? The original Stroop psychology experiments included some other ideas, such as the position of words, but these did not tend to lend themselves to card designs. Instead, I experimented with typography and decided I could easily distinguish the case of a word and could outline it or not.




This was an improvement, but one more axis was needed to flesh out the deck. Some brainstorming surfaced the idea of counting the letters in the words themselves. To make this work, I needed to finesse my color choices, and settled on the following word list:


RED • BLUE • GREEN • YELLOW
BIG • LITTLE
HOLLOW • SOLID
THREE • FOUR • FIVE • SIX


The final list had the very nice property that each word has 3, 4, 5, or 6 letters, and there are three words of each of those lengths. This meant that, at minimum, one in four cards were legal plays on a given center card.

The Round 2 Head Trip

The 2013 prototype was workable, but the game came into its own in the run-up to Protospiel Michigan in 2014. As my testers began getting very fast with the existing rules, I began looking for ways to provide variants and new challenges. The winner was to reverse the legal play rule: Instead of playing a card that is described by the card in the middle, players now had to read the words on the cards in their hands, and play one that describes the middle card.

The fun of the game is in players getting confused, and how better to confuse people than to switch up the rules midstream? The variant became codified as round two: After the first round is over, scores are recorded and players began anew, with the altered rule for legal plays.

The rules were then simplified to reduce the need for a scoring mechanism. Instead of keeping score, I realized that performance in round one could be used to handicap round two. After round one, players keep their unplayed cards, and the played cards are redistributed evenly, so the better a player performs in round one, the fewer cards they have to get rid of in round two. This neatly determines an overall winner without the need for scorekeeping.

Deck Composition

The possible combinations of attributes could yield a total of 192 cards: 12 words x 4 colors x 2 sizes x 2 patterns. This deck was clearly overkill, so for my working prototype I used half of these combinations, chosen so that exactly half of the cards were big, exactly half solid, exactly one-fourth red, and so on.

I went to some lengths to retain this balance throughout development. When green letters turned out to be difficult to distinguish from blue and yellow in some lighting (and as I endeavored to serve colorblind players as well as possible), I moved to black letters mostly because "black" and "green" both have five letters.




My insistence on a balanced subset of cards turned out to be a bit superstitious; once the card distribution was defined, it could be altered a bit from perfect symmetry without anyone noticing. The final deck has 65 cards, enough for a four-player game, and is slightly uneven without an effect on gameplay.

One improvement in the composition was removing as many "self-describers" as possible. It turned out that players had a reduced challenge in dealing with cards that happened to describe themselves, e.g., a blue card that reads "blue". The final deck has no cards of this type, with the notable exception of the word "four" which inherently describes itself. Now the "run of fours" that can happen in a game just gives a bit of fun texture to the proceedings.

Experiments Along Further Axes

The twelve-word list is enough for most players for quite some time, but I also put some effort into ideas for further expansion to keep the game fresh for as long as possible. Heather Newton gets credit for the seed of the idea for the expansion included in the game box, which features cards with backwards text:




Some other experiments have proved less successful, but fun nonetheless. Never will a typographer squirm so much as if you show them the following card:




Gone Cardboard

And now Stroop is in print! The journey isn't over for me, though, as I'm actively working on variant rules for less stressful games and figuring out what it means to translate this game into a foreign language when word lengths are such an integral aspect of play.

I hope you'll enjoy this tiny brain-twister of a game!


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Crowdfunding Round-up: Rush, Rise and Tumble Through a Radiant Kitchen Dawn

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• Let's start this week's c.f. round-up with what's simultaneously the quietest-looking and the most graphically striking game on the line-up: Todd Sanders' IUNU. Sanders first released this game as a print-and-play in 2013 through his own Air and Nothingness Press, and now LudiCreations is releasing the game to distribution following their 2016 release of Sanders' They Who Were 8.

In IUNU, 2-4 players attempt to build a society in ancient Egypt, getting a (mostly) new hand of cards each round, playing one or more cards of the same type from that hand to either collect taxes, gain influence, create art, feed your population, and control access to the afterlife. (KS link)

We shot an overview of the game on a mock-up during SPIEL 2016, which shows more of the game than that short description above:



• Kickstarter used to be a U.S.-only phenomenon, but with publishers from around the world now having access to it, it's common to see preorders for games that will debut at the SPIEL convention in October, as with Dávid Turczi's Kitchen Rush from Artipia Games. In a manner similar to Tobias Stapelfeldt's Space Dealer, Kitchen Rush has you using sand timers as workers in your kitchen, with you assigning these workers to tasks like food preparation, order taking, and cooking and them needing to stay in place until those tasks are finished. The sand timers make a lot more sense in this setting, perhaps only because I can imagine the needs of a kitchen far more than I can a dealer of goods in space. (KS link)

• Tim Heerema's Archmage from Game Salute is described by the publisher as "a hybrid of euro-style and thematic board games, featuring exploration, resource gathering and management, area/map control, and a spell system where players shape a tableau of player powers over the course of the game." Lots going on in the familiar setting of players aiming to become the new archmage to replace the still revereded, but now-retired Joe Merlin. (KS link)

Vesuvius Media's description of Luís Brüeh's Covil: The Dark Overlords mentions that the game is "a tribute to awesome 80s cartoons, filled with references to our favorite and unforgettable characters", but I don't recognize anyone depicted, despite spending far too many hours in the 1980s watching cartoons. In any case, in the game you're a dark overlord who is commanding minions and using special powers to dominate the lands — all for the benefit of those who live there, of course. (KS link)

• Coincidentally, Savage Planet: The Fate of Fantos from Darth Rimmer, Travis Watkins, and Imp House bills itself as a "beautifully illustrated, dark fantasy card game inspired by comics and cartoons from the 80s". Are they talking about Heavy Metal here? I could see that influence, but that's hardly the first thing that comes to mind when I hear the phrase "comics and cartoons from the 80s". As for gameplay, 3-6 players use Shards build up Personal Tableaus to shield themselves from the Whims of Zodraz and its Excessive Capitalization. (KS link)

• Is there room on the game market for more than one cooperative game about finding a cure to prevent a pandemic? Jay Little and Split Second Games think so, with Zero Hour telling a three-act story of the heroes searching for clues about the mastermind in various cities (pressing their luck to find out more info at the risk of being chased out of town by Afflicted), then hunting down that shady character to stop him and prevent more mutations. (KS link)

• Another cooperative challenge comes courtesy of Stephen Avery, Christopher Batarlis, and Everything Epic Games, with Metal Dawn presenting players with a Skynet-style revolution that threatens the extinction of humanity unless they can corner the rogue electronic intelligence and keep it from mutating to freedom. (KS link)

Pocket Ops from Brandon Beran and Grand Gamers Guild plays like tic-tac-toe with bluffing as rival spymasters try to claim a row of squares for themselves, while using specialist agents that bring unique powers to the game. (KS link)

Hisashi Hayashi first released his city-building game Minerva through his own OKAZU Brand label in 2015, after which it appeared via Japon Brand at SPIEL 2015. As happens with many such titles from JB, Minerva has now been licensed for distribution on a wider scale, with Pandasaurus Games overhauling the artwork and graphic design courtesy of Franz Vohwinkel. In the game, players build their own city tile by tile, activating all the tiles in the same row and column as the tile just placed, allowing you to build fresh combos each game — assuming an opponent doesn't snatch a tile away from you first. (KS link)

Rise of Tribes from Brad Brooks is Breaking Games' first go on Kickstarter, and the campaign seems to be a breakout success, with the game having a simple gameplay hook: Roll two dice, slide them into the leftmost space of two of the four actions (bumping out the rightmost die in each case), then take those two actions at a strength determined by the three dice now visible there. What are you trying to do with these actions? Get your tribes to rise, natch. (KS link)

Radiant from Randal Marsh and Tin Shoe Games is only the second trick-taking area-control game with which I am familiar (with 2015's Joraku being the other). In each of the three ages, players start with some cards in hand, draft additional cards, then move around the game board, competing to control areas with the location of a battle determining which suit will carry the day. (KS link)

• The final title this week isn't a game, but rather a logic-puzzle-style code-teaching device called Turing Tumble (KS link) that is easier to see in action that describe, so here's an overview video from the creator:




Editor's note: Please don't post links to other Kickstarter projects in the comments section. Write to me via the email address in the header, and I'll consider them for inclusion in a future crowdfunding round-up. Thanks! —WEM
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New Game Round-up: New Editions, Expansions and Spinoffs for Wildcatters, The Climbers, Sellswords, Quartermaster General, and Legends of Andor

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• U.S. publisher Capstone Games has announced the Q4 2017 release of two titles, the first being a new edition of Wildcatters from designers Rolf Sagel and André Spil, which first appeared in 2013 from Dutch publisher RASS Games. In the game, players represent oil barons in the 19th century who are operating around the globe to develop oil fields; bid for oil rights; and build rigs, oil tankers, trains, and refineries — all in an effort to deliver more oil than anyone else.

• The second title from Capstone Games is Holger Lanz' The Climbers, with this being the first release from Simply Complex, a new brand from Capstone that focuses on "board games with a beautiful 3D table presence, relatively low rules overhead, and deep gameplay, accomplished in under one hour of play".

In The Climbers, players take turns moving colored blocks — which initially form one giant block — in order to create towers that they then climb with their figure. Sometimes you can jump to the next level; at other times you must spend one of your precious ladders. You can climb only onto the neutral color or sides of the blocks that match your own color, so ideally each move of yours serves to both advance yourself and hinder others as you try to ascend higher than anyone else.

Nuno Bizarro Sentieiro and Paulo Soledade's Brasil was added to the BGG database in 2012, and the game at one time bore a SPIEL 2016 release date, then that date was moved to 2017, and now the designers and publisher What's Your Game? have announced that they'll take the game to Kickstarter sometime in 2017, which will push the release date to (at least) 2018. Says Soledade, "The main reason for this to happen is related to production values. As the development progressed during these past couple of years, the once called Vila Rica transformed itself into a bigger game named Brasil. In order to pay justice to it, all of the components and some of its now 'epic characteristics' were calling for a general improvement of the normal production elements."

Ian Brody of Griggling Games will be playtesting two games at both the 2017 Origins Game Fair and Gen Con 2017, one of those being a three-player expansion for Quartermaster General titled The Cold War and the other being SHAEF, a two-player WW2 card-driven wargame covering the ten months following D-Day in Western Europe that will be released by PSC Games.

• Thames & Kosmos, the U.S. branch of German publisher KOSMOS, has let me know that Legends of Andor: The Last Hope — the third boxed set in the fantasy cooperative game from Michael Menzel — is due out in the U.S. on November 1, 2017, with the Dark Heroes expansion to follow later that month.

An English-language version of the two-player game Die Legenden von Andor: Chada & Thorn is not currently on Thames & Kosmos' release calendar.

Stronghold Games' Stephen Buonocore has let slip that Terraforming Mars now has six planned expansions for it instead of the four previously announced. The first expansion — the double-sided game board Hellas & Elysium — will debut at the 2017 Origins Game Fair in mid-June, with a U.S. street date of July 12, 2017.

Level 99 Games will release a standalone sequel to Cliff Kamarga's drafting, tile-placement game Sellswords, with Sellswords: Olympus being first available in July 2017 to those who preorder, then in August to those attending Gen Con 2017, then finally to retail stores later in August. Here's an overview of the game:

Quote:
The gods of Olympus have gone to war! Who will heed the call? Skilled warriors from all across the land rally to fight, met on the opposite side by magical beasts and monsters from myth. Lead your heroes to victory and become the champion of Olympus!

Sellswords: Olympus is a fast-paced strategy game of drafting soldiers and deploying them to the field of battle. It takes only a few minutes to learn, but with fifty different heroes and monsters, each with their own unique ability to use and master, the possibilities for forming your army are limitless! Capture enemy units to turn them to your side in the battle. It's not enough to simply control the most of the field, though; you have to choose your targets carefully to outflank your opponent! Four different terrain tiles provide alternate play methods, giving you new strategies to explore!


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Sat Jun 10, 2017 3:18 pm
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