BoardGameGeek News

To submit news, a designer diary, outrageous rumors, or other material, contact us at news@boardgamegeek.com.

[1]  Prev «  434 , 435 , 436 , 437 , 438  Next »  [438]

Recommend
76 
 Thumb up
6.00
 tip
 Hide

Nürnberg: What's That All About Anyway?

Hilko Drude
Germany
Goettingen
Lower Saxony
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
What are you doing!? I don't even know you!
Avatar
Microbadge: Are you lookin' at me?!Microbadge: AtheistMicrobadge: Er... not completely!
From gallery of W Eric Martin
With the Nürnberg Toy Fair nearly over for 2011, I will attempt to write something about it. I have been there for all of Saturday and most of Sunday, and since most of you who read this probably have little or no opportunity to go there, I will try to let you know my impressions. This will be a completely subjective account of things I noticed, so please bear with me if I make no mention of your favorite publisher/designer/teddy bear or whatever. Thanks.

From gallery of HilkMAN


Here's what I won't do in this write-up:

• Give you an overview of new releases. Aside from being impossible to do in just two days, with the Nürnberg Canonical geeklist we have a much better tool for that already. (Editor's note: Boy, do I need to update that geeklist! —WEM)

• Show you hundreds of photos that I took. Officially, taking photos isn't even allowed for ordinary visitors. I asked every time that I wanted to take one, and permission was usually granted. Exceptions were large publishers who were more than happy to supply me with press folders containing CDs or a USB stick – I haven't even been able to look at all that material, although I am working on it – and in one isolated case I wasn't allowed to take a photo of a crossover of our two favorite timeless classics: Hello Kitty Yahtzee.

So after a while, I stopped taking photos of individual games altogether. I am neither great at it, nor was I willing to spend a large amount of my time asking permission and fumbling around with my shabby pocket camera, nor was there much use for it when with one smile I could get a bunch of professional pictures at once. I will upload as many as possible of these to the database, but it is a large task and will take me some time. For a good overview of many new releases, I recommend a visit to the German board game site hall9000, which offers a slide show covering many publishers' new releases.

• Tell you everything about the latest in toy cars, miniature trains, carnival costumes, wooden toys, the multitude of pitiful imitations of famous brand toys, children's stationery, plastic junk, construction kits, kids' science labs, remote controlled helicopters, bathtub toys, fluffy animals, less fluffy animals and so much more – it was all there, and there wasn't nearly enough time even if I had been interested in all of it.

Board Game Publisher: LEGO
I will, however, tell you something about LEGO and Playmobil, because A: everybody around here seems to love these two brands, B: LEGO at least does some board games, and C: their booths show quite well how this fair differs from, say, Essen.

The comparison to Essen seems a good starting point, I think, as many of you have been there or at least read all about it. Now Nürnberg is really different from Essen in many ways. First of all, the Nürnberg Toy Fair is considerably larger than Spiel. There are 17 halls of different sizes, and the areas between the halls are also bigger, containing many additional booths, snack points, information centers, press and conference rooms, etc. In fact, you can take a shuttle bus from the eastern entrance to the main entrance hall and back. (I don't particularly recommend doing this, however, and if you do try to make that trek, ALWAYS ask the driver which way s/he is going as the staff who directs people into the buses aren't always competent. When trying to reach my train on Saturday night, I (along with dozens of others) was sent on a 45-minute sightseeing drive to the adjacent parking lots, until I finally asked the driver to just let me out, after which I walked another 15 minutes to get to the other side of the fair – I'm a fast walker, mind you — just in time to get the train leaving one hour later than the one I would have easily caught just walking in the first place. End of rant.)

Another sign of the size of this event was getting lost and ending up in the back of the LEGO booth. There was an open door and I caught a glance... of an actual kitchen and canteen for the booth staff (I assume). I have no idea, really, but I estimate that the staff of the Danish toy giant probably numbered way over a hundred people.

From gallery of HilkMAN
From gallery of HilkMAN
From gallery of HilkMAN


A second major difference between Essen and Nürnberg is that Nürnberg is open only to people who belong to the industry. That means you can get a ticket only if you are either an exhibitor (or are invited by one, which does happen), a store owner, a journalist or anything else of the sort. Being a gamer doesn't qualify, unfortunately. Being a game designer does, though, and members of SAZ, the Game Designer Association can get a free ticket if they order it early enough, which is how I got mine. One upside of this restriction is that while there are a lot of people at the show, Nürnberg isn't remotely similar to Essen on a Saturday. There are no great lines at the entrances, and you always have enough room to walk rather fast, unless you are on an escalator or something similar. When you approach a booth of a larger publisher and ask for specific information, you often hear "Are you our customer already?" That doesn't mean, "Did you ever buy a LEGO set when you were little?" It just shows that the staff expect most visitors to be interested in business contacts. Bring plenty of name cards, as you will be asked repeatedly.

While it is possible to get somewhere fast, it isn't always easy to find out where you are. The aisles often have walls that are three meters high, so in many cases the signs showing you the way to whatever direction you are currently looking for are often covered from your view. I lost my orientation (briefly in each case) around 20 times over two days, and this was my second time in Nürnberg. There is some room for improvement here, I think.

From gallery of W Eric Martin
The Playmobil booth was a good example of the purpose of this fair. I asked to have a look around to possibly write about it. I was asked for my name card, then told to wait for a moment. Then, as the person in charge of the press wasn't free yet, I was invited to have a look at the novelty show – and only then was I admitted into the actual booth. Once I was inside, plenty of people were ready to explain the details of what was on display, with most of the toys being behind glass. Explanations always included release dates within the year, target ages, product line, whether TV advertising was in the making and lots of other things I didn't care about. Most other customers did, however.

Once I finished, I again waited at the press counter. While doing that, I looked around and noticed a circle of maybe a dozen counters in the center of the booth. Each of these counters was staffed by someone in charge of distribution for a certain area, distinguished by zip codes for the German market, some international counters, etc. All of them were equipped with snacks, and there was interaction going on at many of these while I was waiting. Surrounding this area were more counters for additional business transactions. You could spend a long, long time in there, getting plenty of information and never touch a single Playmobil piece.

Eventually I was received by the press representative, told her what I was planning to do, and asked for a press folder. The whole conversation was very nice, and not being part of the "customer" crowd was happily accepted. And before walking out I got a cool Playmobil pirate – which made my daughter seriously happy.

From gallery of HilkMAN


What I just described about LEGO and Playmobil applies mostly to larger companies, of course – the smaller ones sometimes consist of a table and two people only. From a gamer's perspective, these are your only serious chance of actually playing anything. At the larger publishers' booths, you are guided from table to table and get a brief explanation of each game. There is neither any space nor any time to actually play – there aren't any free tables, and the next group or visitor will be close behind you. Two or three sample turns will be all you get, at most. There are some exceptions to this rule, particularly on Sunday afternoon (and up to Tuesday, the last day of the fair, I hear), but playing games is not a main concern of most exhibitors. The Game Designer Association runs a gaming cafe with a few tables and a game library, but it is often hard to get a seat and tables tend to be taken up by people not playing but chatting or doing business. It's a friendly atmosphere there, though.

Another problem with playing a game on display is that you might pick up a game box at a publisher's table and find out that it is just that: An empty box. (Sometimes they are made from rather thin paper and cannot even be opened.) And it's not like they are hiding away the components – the games are simply not ready yet, but rather are being announced for later this year. And while game publishers are usually quite relaxed about it, LEGO and other giants strictly prohibit taking photos of items not released yet.

The board and card game publishers actually take up a surprisingly large part of the whole show. However, it is a bit difficult to tell. There are some thematic halls, some regional halls, and others I couldn't figure out, but nothing is really strict. Haba was several halls away from any other publisher I checked out, for example. Don't ask me why. Maybe it's because Haba does not make only games but also other things, and they had to pick where to be placed? In any case, I estimate that game companies make up three or even four full halls out of the seventeen, which I find a remarkable share, as this fair pretty much covers all non-electronic toy sectors and some electronic stuff, too.

So is Nürnberg worth the trip for gamers (who are lucky enough to get a ticket)? Maybe. I had a great time and I am looking forward to going again next year (1st to 6th of February, 2012 – from Wednesday to Monday). Nürnberg can be a great place to meet people from the industry, and even to advertise your game if you are a designer. However, I do recommend making a plan of what you hope to do before you go. I find the show too big to just wander around looking for whatever highlights it might have in store. Make appointments with people you hope to meet and leave plenty of time in between – there's your recipe for a great experience.

From gallery of HilkMAN
Meeples from Carcassonne: Das Gefolge – they really are transparent!


From gallery of HilkMAN
We've all flown on these airlines before.


From gallery of HilkMAN
Halli Galli Sommerspaß with waterproof cards – I think there is some potential for this concept considering the "no drinks on my table" debate...


From gallery of HilkMAN
Finally, my favorite image – The sign says: "Our company is looking for sales representatives". Well, good luck with that!
Twitter Facebook
13 Comments
Tue Feb 8, 2011 3:37 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
57 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Links: Reports from Nürnberg 2011, Saint Petersburg in Slate & More

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
badge
Avatar
From gallery of W Eric Martin
Time for another round-up of game news from across the webs, starting with that giant toy and game show taking place in Nürnberg, Germany:

• Photos from the Nürnberg 2011 Spielwarenmesse have started to appear; check out the 60-ish photos from German retailer Milan-Spiele, which includes a taste of what's coming from Amigo for Spiel 2011 and other surprises.

Matt Leacock's Pandemic has won MinD Spielepreis 2011 – the annual gaming award from Mensa in Deutschland (aka, MinD) – beating out (in order) Dominion, Agricola, Galaxy Trucker and Blokus.

• Michael Lewis, author of Liar's Poker and The Big Short, is interviewed by Tim Harford for an article in Financial Times (and reprinted on Slate) while playing a learning game of Saint Petersburg. Says Lewis, "This game is all about trade-offs ... it's made for the Anglo-Saxon Protestant work ethic. The Greeks would never appreciate it."

Sid Sackson's classic book A Gamut of Games is returning to print in late March 2011 from Dover Publications.

Fantasy Flight Games is hiring an Associate Media Producer. Head to the link for details on how to apply.

Cubo Magazine is a new Spanish-language site devoted to game news.

• Designer Jeffrey D. Allers has sent his latest Postcard from Berlin on Opinionated Gamers, this time talking about limits in life and in game design, with designers needing to keep the limits natural and (ideally) invisible during play. Props for working in a reference to Mark Dunn's Ella Minnow Pea.

In a January 2011 post on Berlin Game Design, Allers noted that after receiving a royalty check he realized that his published designs have collectively sold more than 20,000 copies since 2008. While a nice milestone, Allers adds this warning note to prospective designers:

Quote:
To put this into perspective, even if I would have sold four times the number of games since 2008, my income would still put me below the poverty level in the United States. It's a good thing I'm not trying to support my family with my game design hobby, and I wouldn't recommend anyone else trying to do this, either, unless he or she is already milking an established hit.
• And finally some Wall Street employee named Derk Solko is quoted on why Monopoly is unpleasant to play in an article for Cracked.com on "5 Classic Board Games With Disturbing Origin Stories." Cracked doesn't spend time fact-checking its articles and verifying source info? Who knew?
Twitter Facebook
14 Comments
Mon Feb 7, 2011 7:50 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
95 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide

Serge Laget Talks about Cargo Noir, Game Design & How to Design for Days of Wonder

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
badge
Avatar
Board Game: Cargo Noir
U.S./French publisher Days of Wonder releases only one or two standalone games annually, and given the company's track record of hits – Mystery of the Abbey, Ticket to Ride, Memoir '44, Shadows over Camelot, BattleLore, Colosseum, Small World – each new release commands attention from gamers wondering whether the company can please both casual and intense gamers yet again.

Looking at Days of Wonder's publishing record to see who's designing all these hits, three names stand out more frequently than others: Alan R. Moon (Ticket to Ride), Richard Borg (Memoir '44, BattleLore) and Serge Laget, co-designer of Mystery of the Abbey, Shadows over Camelot and Mystery Express and solo designer of DoW's forthcoming Cargo Noir, which hits stores in March 2011.

Cargo Noir puts players in the role of "families" – i.e., gangsters – who want to profit from goods they acquire for a price from ports around the world. The more goods of the same type they can assemble – or conversely the wider variety of goods – the more they'll earn, which is profit they can put toward buying yachts, night clubs, a bank or even their own principality. Some purchases – collectively dubbed "the smuggler's edge" – provide protection from others who want to intrude on your turf, an additional action, or additional warehouse space to hold the ill-gotten gains. All of these purchases are worth victory points, and the player with the most points at the end of the game wins.

Game play is simplicity itself. At the end of each turn, you place your ships in one of three types of locations: the casino, the black market, or a port that holds 1-4 randomly drawn goods. If you travel to a port, you need to make an offer for the goods by placing money under your ship. At the start of a turn, you earn two money for each ship at the casino, draw a random good or swap goods at the black market, and collect goods (or not) in the port, paying the money you offered. The exception in a port is if another player has placed a ship and offered more money; in this case, you either take back your ship and money or put more funds in the offer, pushing the "stay-or-go" decision back on the opponent. You then have an opportunity to sell goods and buy things.
Read more »
Twitter Facebook
5 Comments
Mon Feb 7, 2011 7:12 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
167 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: 7 Wonders: Leaders, Dixit: The Odyssey, Shogun & More

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
badge
Avatar
Board Game: 7 Wonders
At this point I'm still feeling my way around the BGG News stage and figuring out the best way to do things. Let me know in the comments whether you prefer posts that include short descriptions of many new items (such as this post) or separate posts for each item. The goal, of course, is for everyone to find out about the games they might want to find out about, while not being burdened to read every fool thing I might post.

And now, on to a few tidbits about new or forthcoming games!

• Designer Antoine Bauza has posted info about 7 Wonders: Leaders, on display at the Nürnberg 2011 Toy Fair. The white-backed Leader cards are played at the start of each of the game's three ages, not mixed with the other cards, and they cost money to be played, not resources. The expansion will likely include 35 cards along with a new double-sided wonder.

Bauza also notes that in response to comments from buyers, the next print run of 7 Wonders will have a plastic insert instead of a cardboard one, and cardboard coins instead of wooden ones.

• In more news from Nürnberg 2011, French website Jedisjeux reports that Dixit has sold 350,000 copies so far and will be followed by a new standalone game from designer Jean-Louis Roubira titled Dixit: l'Odyssée. While the game will include new rule variants, including a team option that allows for up to ten players, the cards – once again bearing art from Mary Cardouat – can also be mixed with those in the base game and expansion.

• To confirm an earlier report of a new edition of Samurai Swords/Shogun coming down the pike, yes, the game will once again be available, this time from Avalon Hill. A January 27, 2011 press release announcing Pegasus Spiele as the distributor of Avalon Hill titles in Germany and Austria includes the game in a list of games to be distributed, albeit with the name Ikusa (and the clarifying note "formerly Shogun"). The game is listed at €65 with a publish date of June 26, 2011. Other titles forthcoming from the deal include Risk: 2210 A.D. (due April 2011) and Acquire (in late 2011).
Read more »
Twitter Facebook
30 Comments
Sun Feb 6, 2011 7:12 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
74 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Links: Three Spiel des Jahres for 2011, Win a Trip to Carcassonne & More

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
badge
Avatar
From gallery of W Eric Martin
Here's the latest from around the web relating to these games we play:

• The Spiel des Jahres committee has announced that for the 2011 award ceremony, three games will be named "game of the year" instead of only two, which has been the case since 2001 when the Kinderspiel des Jahres award began. According to the committee (in my translation):

Quote:
The third prize is meant for players who have a lot of experience playing board games and are searching for more of a challenge....

The committee is responding to changes in the board game market. Supply and demand have grown for rule-intensive games in the past few years. The critics want to reward originality and innovation, while giving authors and publishers an incentive to continue their creative work in this segment of the market.
As for the Spiel des Jahres itself, that award will still go to a game aimed at all players. The three game of the year awards will be announced June 27, 2011 in Berlin.

• To celebrate the 10th anniversary of Carcassonne and its utter domination of game shelves around the world, Dutch publisher 999 Games is sponsoring a contest in which you must guess the number of games sold worldwide in the entire Carcassonne family. The winner gets a weekend for two in Carcassonne (the city, not the game box), and those who sign up for the 999 Games newsletter have a chance to win a game package worth €250. Deadline for entry is May 1, 2011.

• In an excellent example of how to introduce a game to potential players, GMT Games will host a live online demonstration of Volko Ruhnke's forthcoming game Andean Abyss on February 10, 2011 at 7:30 EST (GMT -5). Head to the GMT website for details on how to access the GMT Ventrilo Voice Server.
Read more »
Twitter Facebook
23 Comments
Sun Feb 6, 2011 6:38 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
307 
 Thumb up
4.53
 tip
 Hide

Publisher Diary: How to Run a Game Company Out of Your Closet

Greg Lam
United States
Boston
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
Avatar
Microbadge: Pair-of-Dice Games
Board Game Publisher: Pair-of-Dice Games
It's not my day job, but I run a game publishing company. Pair-of-Dice Games was started in 2001 by me and a couple of my friends. My friends moved on after a few years while I kept the business going, and in the ten years I've been running Pair-of-Dice, I've self-published 12 games that run the gamut from simple abstract games (Knockabout, Warp 6) to a dexterity game involving chopsticks (Chopstick Dexterity MegaChallenge 3000) to a Euro game with the game board housed in a restaurant's menu cover (Restaurant Row).

The common thread between all of these games is that I make them by myself. When someone orders a game, I go into the Ikea storage bench which houses most of my game bits and dig out the right combination of dice, dyed wooden bits, screenprinted handkerchiefs, bowls, sauce dishes, and eating utensils that comprise one of the seven games that I currently offer.

Every once in a while, I realize that I'm running low on restaurant menu covers (which I order from a restaurant supply company), little wooden stars and spools (which I order from a company in Maine), or plastic bowls and sauce dishes (Dollar Store and Super 88 Asian Grocery store, respectively) and have to get more. How many games I sell is pretty much directly proportional to the effort I put into promoting them. Have I sent reviewers, podcasters and other board game cognoscenti review copies? Should I go to this or that convention to do game demos? Orders trickle in by ones and twos off my web site, or by one or two dozen if Boards and Bits or FunAgain calls. It's not the most efficient way to build a brand, I know, but it's one that lets me concentrate on the part of game design that I enjoy most: Making new games.

Board Game: Chopstick Dexterity MegaChallenge 3000
Chopstick Dexterity MegaChallenge 3000 – game pieces drying after being dyed

Read more »
Twitter Facebook
52 Comments
Sun Feb 6, 2011 6:30 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
73 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide

Dragon*Con 2010

Mary Prasad
United States
Hillsborough
North Carolina
flag msg tools
Avatar
Microbadge: Professional PhotographerMicrobadge: World TravellerMicrobadge: The Opinionated Gamers fanMicrobadge: DiverMicrobadge: Tichu fan
From gallery of W Eric Martin
Dragon*Con is usually held in Atlanta, Georgia, over Labor Day weekend; for 2010 that was September 3-6. They hail themselves as the "largest multi-media, popular culture convention focusing on science fiction and fantasy, gaming, comics, literature, art, music, and film in the universe." Wow, that's a big tagline – not to mention possibly offensive to certain aliens.

Memberships usually do not sell out so you may wait to register at the convention. In fact, this year the line was so incredibly long for preregistration that it might even be faster to wait (although next year may see a switch as all those who were in the prereg. line figure this out). I will say that the badges for preregistration are larger and possibly valuable (to those who collect them). On the other hand, hosting hotels sell out very quickly. If you want to book a room in a Dragon*Con block, you should sign up as soon as they open. If you do not get one in a block, you can try to reserve a room anyway. I advise that you do not tell them you are attending the convention since some hotels will not allow you to book a room if they know you are attending the convention. Yes, this actually happened to me. If you belong to an organization like AAA, you can try to get a discount that way, or just ask what specials they have running. Once in a while I get a rate that is better than the convention rate (this may involve paying ahead). You should ask about refund policies before booking.

Fun Facts: (from the Media Relations Handbook) approximate number of attendees 35,000; volunteers 1,700; guests 400; years 24; hotels 5; days 4.

From gallery of diceychic

Three of the many Lara Croft/Tomb Raiders at Dragon Con. Note the preregistration size badges.

Read more »
Twitter Facebook
20 Comments
Sat Feb 5, 2011 6:30 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
52 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Nürnberg 2011: Pics of the Queen Games line-up

Rob Harris
United Kingdom
Surbiton
London
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
Microbadge: Playtester / Prototype fanMicrobadge: TraderMicrobadge: Golden Board Game CollectorMicrobadge: Autism AcceptanceMicrobadge: Playtest UK - a friendly group of games designers/playtesters who meet up to play each other's prototypes
From gallery of W Eric Martin
(In this Nürnberg 2011 report from Feb. 3, 2011, Rob Harris ran down what to expect from Queen Games in 2011. Rob has now sent photos from the show, so I'm reprinting that section below with photos in place a few extra details gleaned from the images to give you a better idea of what to expect in the months ahead. —WEM)

These are all 2011 releases from Queen Games without specific release dates, and yes, the descriptions are sketchy for many of these. The titles are:

Castelli, by Günter Burkhardt – nothing else known at this time.

From gallery of W Eric Martin

Read more »
Twitter Facebook
24 Comments
Sat Feb 5, 2011 4:35 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
33 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide

Toronto Toy Show Report 2011

Chris Kovac
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Microbadge: Warfighter fanMicrobadge: Curling fanMicrobadge: Terraforming Mars fanMicrobadge: I was here for BGG's Tenth Anniversary!
From gallery of W Eric Martin
The last weekend in January means my annual trip to the Canadian Toy & Hobby Fair in Toronto. This is a small trade show featuring toys and games for the Canadian market. Since this show is geared towards the kids market, many of the board games shown are also geared towards that market, though there are exceptions. As usual I found a few games which might interest us hobbyist gamers. Unlike in previous years, I am going to group games by distributor, then in an "Innovators" section for independent designers.

Îlot 307 inc.

This game distributor out of Quebec had a selection of Euro-style games at the show, the most interesting of which were Sultans of Karaya, Water Lily and Vizia.

Sultans of Karaya, by Alex Weldon (MJ Games) – This is an interesting Werewolf-like small box game themed around an evil assassin who is trying to kill the Sultan. The game ends when the Sultan is killed by the assassin, the Sultan kills the assassin, or three slaves sit side-by-side, thereby starting a revolution.

At the start of the game, each person is dealt a hidden character; during the game, they can either exchange their character with another player or a neutral card in the middle of the table, or use their special power, revealing their card in the process. Other characters include the seductive dancing girl, the stalwart bodyguards, a seer (who bets on who is going to win), and the slave. This looks to be a fun party game for those who would like a change from Werewolf.

From gallery of W Eric Martin
From gallery of W Eric Martin

Read more »
Twitter Facebook
8 Comments
Fri Feb 4, 2011 9:18 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
81 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Nürnberg 2011: Queen Games & Hans im Glück's Pantheon

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
badge
Avatar
From gallery of W Eric Martin
All credit for the following Nürnberg 2011 report goes to

Rob Harris
United Kingdom
Surbiton
London
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
Microbadge: Playtester / Prototype fanMicrobadge: TraderMicrobadge: Golden Board Game CollectorMicrobadge: Autism AcceptanceMicrobadge: Playtest UK - a friendly group of games designers/playtesters who meet up to play each other's prototypes

who contacted me prior to Nürnberg 2011 to see which companies I'd be interested in hearing more about while he was at the show. I said Queen Games and HiG's Pantheon, and that's what Rob sent me. Kudos, Rob! Now, on to the report, which I've edited due to Rob having typed on a phone while being sleep-deprived...


First, let's take a look at the Queen Games line-up for 2011. These are all 2011 releases without specific release dates, and yes, the descriptions are sketchy for many of these. This is a start, though, and we'll build from here. The titles are:

From gallery of W Eric Martin
Fresco: The Glaziers, which was released in January 2011 in North America and is also available in Europe. This expansion box consists of modules 4-6 for the Spiel des Jahres-nominated Fresco, with players being able to mix-and-match these modules with any in the base game, in addition to using them individually. (2-4 players, 10+, 60-90 minutes)

German Railways (1832-1872), a new edition of Winsome Games' Preußische Ostbahn, a railway game through German history. (3-5 players, 12+, 60 minutes)

Kairo, in which players build a stall in Cairo's bustling marketplace in order to attract customers and sell wares. (2-4 players, 10+, 60 minutes) (Interesting to think that this game is still on display given all that's happening in Egypt generally, and Cairo in particular, this past week. —WEM)

Lancaster, with players as English lords who are supporting the King during his conflict with France, while simultaneously trying to build castles for themselves nad increase their influence in Parliament. (2-5 players, 10+, 60 minutes)
Read more »
Twitter Facebook
11 Comments
Fri Feb 4, 2011 4:32 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls

[1]  Prev «  434 , 435 , 436 , 437 , 438  Next »  [438]