Memoirs and musings of a gamer

When I first stumbled into board gaming as a hobby, I had no idea where it would take me, nor how much change I would personally go through, as I played more and more games, but also got influence by other fellow gamers. This blog will serve as a reminder for myself, of the journey so far. I mean to chronicle my evolution as a gamer and sometimes thoughts that occur to me regarding games, designs, trends. This is to be my journal, mainly for my own use, but I don’t mind if you take a peek inside ;)

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This is BAD and how to protect new gamers from this condition.

Vadim Deylgat
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How can you ease other people into the hobby without allowing the vortex of Kickstarter/FOMO/acquisition disorder swallowing them in their first year in? That’s an actual question I am struggling with today.

I have a few colleagues/friends that know of my hobby and that come to me for for advice when they want to add a particular game to their little, embryotic collection. I also have occasional game nights with them, where usually I bring the game and explain it to them. A few weeks back, I introduced them to The Castles of Burgundy. Sure enough, one of them bought his own copy not a week later. More and more I get questions in my WhatsApp like: “Do you know this title? Is it any good? What about this Kickstarter campaign?” What if I do know that game? And what if I think it's good? Do I encourage someone to get it?

If you go back to some of my first posts, where I described the journey I went throug; you'll pick up some hints about my BAD phase (Boardgame Acquisition Disorder).

This was me in the beginning of the hobby:

From gallery of Midav8


If you follow later posts, then you will also see that turned more into a gamer with a cyclical collection. My collection has a solid core of games I expect to never let go and surrounding that is a dynamic cycle of new titles (or oldies I just now tried) coming in, and a regular stream of games going out. It took me a while to get here and be content with a games collection that changes in composition, but not so much in absolute size.

From gallery of Midav8


Now I find myself becoming an unexpected and uneasy mentor to people that are taking their first steps in the hobby. I have been through this rollercoaster myself and I’ve seen people post pics from their shelves from when they entered the hobby and the same (or more) shelves, stuffed with games after their first full year. So the sudden expansion phase that seems to come in the early parts of the hobby is real (for many gamers), maybe even inevitable?

From gallery of Midav8


I want to warn my friends of this. But how do I go about it? From my university education as a psychologist, I remember that you better don't tell people explicitly what NOT to do. They'll end up doing it anyway. Being casual about and saying "Oh, but you don't need to own that game, borrow mine when you want to play." might help, if I own the game they are eying. And such a statement that you don't need to "own" the game, coming from someone who still owns a boatload of games himself, is also a weak argument.

Or should I let them discover on their own where the rabbit hole leads? Should I encourage them to dive in head first, just so they go through the whole thing quickly? Blue pill or red pill?

From gallery of Midav8


BAD is real, though I've also seen most of my veteran board gaming friends beat it,...to some degree. There is a light at the end of that tunnel, but I wonder if going through that BAD tunnel is the only way.

I'm sure that some of you will react in the comments, saying that you never lost control, that you never got BAD. And I want to read about it, because I'm sure not the one with the answers here. I'm just asking the questions.
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Thu Jan 13, 2022 7:00 pm
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Things to look forward to....2022

Vadim Deylgat
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Making a listing of games I look forward to in any new year is always a tricky exercise, with changing release dates and production delays on backed Kickstarters. 2021 made it even more uncertain, with global supply chains clogging up. So here are some games I hope to get my hands on this year. Key word in some cases: "hope".

Nemesis: Lockdown
This one is coming to me shortly. The containers started arriving in Poland the end of December and some backers have received their pledge already, so delivery to my doorstep isn't too far away anymore. This one is mainly meant for solo play and as a big Alien fan, I eventually had to get this game. I hope to get some Hadley's Hope vibes from the game. Nemesis has been climbing the BGG rankings, all the way up into the top 20, so I'm interested to see how it's younger sibling will be received by the gaming community. This does present itself as the prime candidate to become my top thematic game.

Board Game: Nemesis: Lockdown


Foundations of Rome
Victim of unanticipated production changes and all those things. Was supposed to fulfil first half of 2021, but I'm still waiting. Hey, as long as it benefits the eventual quality of the game, I don't mind waiting. I love all things connected to ancient Rome. It's a relatively simple game in term of gameplay, but the production value should be out of this world. This is basically an expensive city building toy, so I am crossing my fingers for good replay value to get the PPP (price per play) down into acceptable levels. Is this just going to be one of the most overproduced abstract games in board gaming history, or will the gameplay prove deep enough to allow for a permanent spot in the collection?

Board Game: Foundations of Rome


Endless Winter: Paleoamericans
We've seen the deck builder/worker placement hybrids dominate late 2020, early 2021 with Lost Ruins of Arnak and Dune: Imperium, but this is the one I am excited for. I expect Endless Winter to be good,...very good. This is probably my most anticipated title, but as a rule I try not to think about it too much until a game is really close to being delivered. That doesn't always work though, especially when an update is posted with pics from the pre-production copy, like the one below. Oh how I yearn to play this...

Board Game: Endless Winter: Paleoamericans


Plains Indian Wars
This might well be the least known title in the list. A GMT Games P500 pre-order which appeared on my radar thanks to their newsletter. It deals with the settling of the European-American colonists in the great plains and the building if the Transcontinental Railroad, a touchy subject to say the least. The game however offers the possibility to play as the native tribes and it abstracts a lot of things out, as it's mainly area control with cubes on a map. Board games, like other forms of art (movies, literature,...), will at times be set against a background of human history that isn't the finest moment in our species evolution. There are many other games that deal with colonialism, of which I have some on my shelves. I always hope to learn some things from them or have them trigger me to read up on the subject.

Board Game: Plains Indian Wars


Ark Nova
Ah, the darling of the reviewing community, or so it seems to me. OK, it's not a 2022 release, but I had to include this for myself. I initially passed on this game due to the artwork; I'm just not that into animals. But I do like building something, the mechanisms of the game intrigue me and close friends of mine raved about this game. Just before the year turned, I got to try it too and it validated my choice to pre-order my own copy from the second print. Yes, it is as good as advertised and I'll be playing this a lot in 2022.

Board Game: Ark Nova


Legacies
This is a heavy game that has you running an influential family through different generations. It has a long list of mechanisms: multi-use cards, market manipulation, area control/worker placement, set collection, variable round-ends, variable player powers, variable scoring,... This sounds like an "everything ànd the kitchen sink" type of game, which can make it either great or miss it's mark completely if not integrated and balanced well enough. The designer did take additional time in development, which I hope will pay off. This is an ambitious game, no doubt about it.

Board Game: Legacies


Everdell: The Complete Collection
Not a totally new game obviously, but I had passed on Everdell originally and when the first expansions came out, yet I did give it a look now and then. When a (supposedly) final and complete edition was Kickstarted, I investigated further if a tableau/engine building game with a cute theme could appeal to me. Some reviews and playthroughs video's later, I took the leap. I admit to being a late adopter some times, but better late than never?

Board Game: Everdell: The Complete Collection


Darwin's Journey
Simone Luciani and Nestore Mangone teaming up again for a medium to heavy game with a historical/science theme. Newton was a great hit for me and the playthrough video's during the Kickstarter campaign only reaffirmed my interest in the game.

Board Game: Darwin's Journey


Autobahn
Not a lot of information yet, but Nestore Mangone is involved again (see Darwin's Journey above) and it's a economic strategy game which takes place over 3 periods (feeling some Brass vibes here). I assume this one will be an Essen '22 release if development, production and shipping go well.

Board Game: Autobahn


Weather Machine
The Kickstarter says delivery in November 2022, so it's already cutting it close and any delay in production or shipping will push this game into 2023. Nevertheless, any new Lacerda will excite me and I hope that Eagle Gryphon have taken a lot of buffer into this estimate. This is however a pivotal title for me. I wasn't convinced by Escape Plan as it didn't give me the rush of being on the run from the police, nor did On Mars click for me, because it felt thematically disconnected from it's theme. For me personally, the big four remain (in ascending order of enjoyment): Vinhos, Kanban EV, The Gallerist and Lisboa. I want Weather Machine to click for me, I need it to. Because if it doesn't, then I might have to conclude that Vital's vision and my interests as a board gamer have gone in different directions over the past few years. You'll read my conclusion on this in about a year's time.

Board Game: Weather Machine


Now the one thing that is missing from this list is one or more games from Capstone, simply because BGG doesn't list any upcoming releases from them yet and neither does their website (up until December 31st when I was preparing this blogpost). I'm sure Clay Ross has a few games in the pipeline (pun intended ) to add to his already impressive portfolio, I just don't know about them yet. Come on Clay, give me something to get excited about.

So that's the board games that I am aware of for 2022 that spark my interest. What titles are you looking forward to in the new year?
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Fri Jan 7, 2022 7:00 pm
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My top games of 2021

Vadim Deylgat
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Ok, I lied in my previous post. It wasn't to be my last post of the year after all. I couldn't stay behind in listing my favorite games of the past year. There is a caveat though; I have some more games on pre-order that were officially released this year, but are either not delivered yet or are out of stock and I haven't been able to fully play them yet. These include Boonlake, Ark Nova, Origins: First Builders, Corrosion. I expect that at least 2 of these could earn a spot in my top 9, but I can't say right now

So here is my top 9:
1) Coffee Traders
2) Bitoku
3) Imperial Steam
4) Imperium Classics/Legends
5) Messina 1347
6) Ultimate Railroads
7) Mini Express
8) Azul Queen's Garden
9) Lawyer Up

From gallery of Midav8


Happy New Year!
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Thu Dec 30, 2021 4:00 pm
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My top 5 gaming experiences of 2021

Vadim Deylgat
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This is the time of year when everyone is posting their top games of the (almost) past year. I started doing my list, but I deleted my draft and started with a blank page. For me the games are not the central part of my hobby, rather the experiences with other people are the driving factor for me. I'd never have stayed in this hobby if I were doing it purely solo. I like a good solo, but I need people around the table for the full enjoyment. These are my top 5 moments in gaming in 2021.

5. Playing Dice Throne via Zoom
In 2020 we got surprised by the pandemic and the lockdown measure that got imposed. I hardly played any games with friends that year. I was determined not to get stuck playing only solo in 2021 (or at least until restrictions lifted). At the start of the year I received my pledge for Dice Throne: Season One ReRolled and Dice Throne: Season Two – Battle Chest and so did some of my friends. This game lends itself wonderfully well for play by Zoom. Each player selects a character, points their webcam at the player board and dice tray and you start up Zoom. I even signed up for the online tournament that Roxley organized and I made it to the finals of my region. Dice Throne is one of the games that dragged me out of the Covid winter and into the more open spring and summer.

Board Game: Dice Throne: Season Two – Battle Chest


Picture courtesy of @SergiNS

4. Getting absolutely killed in Kamisado,...by my 7 year old
My kids aren't quite into board games, no matter how I tried to convert them from the video games they prefer to the more tangible stuff. There are some titles they like. One of those is Kamisado, at which I'm either really bad, or I have a prodigy in the house. My daughter is 7 years old, but she completely owns this game. She beats her older brother without ease, but she doesn't stop there. Oh no.
When I first taught her the game, she struggled a bit and lost. I'm not the kind of dad that always holds back; my kids need to learn how to get back up after a loss. I will sometimes go easy on them when I feel they are close to beating me, so they can taste victory as well. However, when it comes to Kamisado, I haven't had to hold back once. Our second game was tense, but I edged out a win. It made her even more determined to get back at me. She won game 3,...and 4,...and 5. I have to admit that she surprised me. She continued by soundly thrashing her brother that same weekend. We have kept our score for the year. Currently she stands at 27-12 over me. I will never turn down a game when she asks to play, even though I dread the result. Am I getting old, am I not seeing things that she is? Whatever it may be, the sense of pride for my kid far outweighs the doubts about my own tactical abilities.

Board Game: Kamisado


3. Helping to run my local game club
I hate to come back to Covid and lockdowns, but it's a big part of our reality. The local gaming club I had been going to since I landed in the hobby had to close shop for a pretty long time. I tried to keep our community involved through the associated Facebook group, by posting weekly reminders and mini-blogs. My friends running the club noticed and asked me if I wanted to help out with the game nights when we started up again. I'm not one to shy away from responsibilities and when I'm asked to support the hobby I love, I can't say no. Entertaining others, teaching them a game and allowing them to have a good time, gives me a lot of satisfaction. Co-creating the environment where more people can do this, takes that satisfaction to a next level.

From gallery of Midav8


2. Essen Spiel '21
I didn't get to go to Essen in 2020, because...you know why. So the build up and the anticipation for Spiel '21 was stronger than ever. I missed the crowd, the vibe, all of it. Walking through those bog doors after 2 years and running for that particular release I had to have (hello Bitoku) felt great. Talking to publishers and designers, squeezing into a table where they are lacking a last player, the "currywurst"! I missed it. Granted, it was a smaller edition with fewer games and publishers, but I felt fulfilled after it.

From gallery of Midav8


From gallery of Midav8


1. My friends who picked me up when I was down.
As I wrote about in this blog post, 2021 also was a pivotal year on personal level, as my wife and I decided to call it quits after 20 years together. We are now in the process of getting all practical and financial matters sorted out, and we've been able to be open and constructive about it. The first few weeks after the decision were emotionally heavy though and it was an evening with 2 friends, playing Messina 1347, that allowed me to let go of my worries for a few hours. They respectfully left it to me whether to talk about my situation back at home. Apart of a few sentences, we let the game and other social talk dominate the evening. It was the kind of mental reset I needed. The morning after I felt refreshed and ready to start thinking in a problem solving manner again. There is still some pain at times, but I feel supported by my friends and that gives me strength to take on 2022 and all it's challenges it is bound to hold.

Board Game: Messina 1347


Like I said at the start, this hobby is far more to me than some games. It's the experiences, the camaraderie, the community. Through the hobby I have met so many wonderful people and my life is richer for it. I insert my passion in my parenting where possible, trying to link it to some life lessons I want to pass on to my kids. I get to express myself because of it and apply my sense of responsibility. I like the mental challenged offered by game mechanisms and use board games as a bridge to make new social connections.

2021 was a special year, but now it's time to look ahead. Thanks for reading and commenting. Enjoy the holidays and I'll see you in the new year!
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Thu Dec 23, 2021 7:00 pm
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My top ten favorite publishers - #1

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I have reached the end of my 10 day series through my list of favorite publishers. These are the companies that make the games that I want to play, or they are the names in the industry that trigger a certain positive spark for me. The company that is currently number 1 on my radar is Capstone Games.

A year or so ago, they where on the rise for me, but not quite there yet. But the output from Capstone just keeps getting better and better.

They did start with localizations for the US market and reprints of older titles, like my first game I got with the CG logo on: The Ruhr: A Story of Coal Trade. A heavy Euro with (for some) an unexciting theme, yet it presents you with juicy challenges to get a successful coal trading company on the rails,...or on the Ruhr river. This reprint also comes with the Ohio expansion, though I've had too much fun with the original map that I even didn't try the Ohio yet. Gotta fix that soon.

Board Game: The Ruhr: A Story of Coal Trade


Then in 2019 I saw them get involved in co-publishing Maracaibo and put out Pipeline. Talk about establishing yourself as a house for heavy, involved Euro's. I have to admit that I didn't pay that much attention to Pipeline until the reviews started coming out, but I quickly corrected my mistake. These are 2 very different titles and game experiences, but they each scratch a particular itch.

Board Game: Maracaibo


Board Game: Pipeline


Then last year it was more lighter games with Watergate, where I was late to the party and I discovered the Iron Rail series, in which they do quality reprints of existing cube rails games. I fell in love with Ride the Rails due to it's simplicity and speed to play, yet it allows for a lot of tactical depth and player interaction. I have since purchased Irish Gauge (which I missed at it's release), the expansions for Ride the Rails and then this year Iberian Gauge off course.

Board Game: Ride the Rails


Board Game: Iberian Gauge


By the start of this year, Capstone had solidified it's place in my mental "publishers to watch" list, but then they went completely nuts. Expansions for Pipeline and Maracaibo? Pre-ordered as soon as my FLGS listed them. Oh, they are co-publishing a new Pfister, named Boonlake? Check! Want more heavy games? Coffee Traders and Imperial Steam fit that bill. And then even skipped Ark Nova, though I hope to play that at a friend's place soon.
Especially Coffee Traders and Imperial Steam are instant jewels for the collection. Coffee Traders might just be my personal game of the year. You can read my thoughts on Coffee traders in detail here.

From gallery of Midav8


Board Game: Imperial Steam


Capstone keeps gaining steam (pun intended) with their new releases. This company knocks out one homerun after the other, or at least when it comes to my preferred types of games.

The final list:
1. Capstone Games
2. Board&Dice
3. Eagle-Gryphon Games
4. GMT Games
5. Roxley
6. TMG
7. Awaken Realms
8. Kayenta Games
9. Cranio Creations
10. CMON

There you have it, my 10 favorite publishers. What do you think? And do you have specific publishers you keep an eye on or does the logo on the corner of a box mean nothing to you?
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Sun Dec 19, 2021 6:05 pm
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My top ten favorite publishers - #2

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Another day, another publisher to spotlight. The list is almost complete.

The list:
3. Eagle-Gryphon Games
4. GMT Games
5. Roxley
6. TMG
7. Awaken Realms
8. Kayenta Games
9. Cranio Creations
10. CMON

My number 2 publisher is a house I supported first on Kickstarter back in 2014 when they were still called NSKN Games, but since a merger in 2018 are now Board&Dice. I backed Progress: Evolution of Technology, which is a very underappreciated tableau builder. A nice gesture from them, that I'll always remember, is a postcard I received with a thank you for my support. Getting a message by regular mail in this digital age, is something that doesn't go unnoticed.

Aside from being nice people, Board&Dice have knocked out some great games throughout the years and I am always watching what they'll do next. This is the house of the "dry" Euro, the company that has some great mechanical games, that aren't necessarily heavy on theme, nor do they need to be.

In my eyes, their flagship game still is Teotihuacan: City of Gods with the modular rondel and the "dice as workers" that works so well and offers enough replayability for years to come, especially with the expansions.

Board Game: Teotihuacan: City of Gods


"Teo" kicked of a whole range of T-games: Tawantinsuyu: The Inca Empire, Tekhenu: Obelisk of the Sun, Tabannusi: Builders of Ur, Trismegistus: The Ultimate Formula and by looking at their company page here on BGG, more T-games are coming. I've played all of these, enjoyed most of them and kept those that suited me most in the collection (Teo and Tekhenu).

Board Game: Tekhenu: Obelisk of the Sun


Luckily, they don't just stick to one letter of the alphabet. Otherwise we wouldn't have seen the abstract beauty of Mandala Stones, the quick engine builder that is Inuit: The Snow Folk, or the stellar production of Yedo: Deluxe Master Set. Not all of the games they put out need to be heavy Euro's, as these other titles have proven.

Board Game: Mandala Stones


Board Game: Yedo: Deluxe Master Set

Picture courtesy of @nucleartrask

More is on it's way. I'm awaiting my pre-order of Origins: First Builders, of which I got a taste at Essen and in January they'll launch another deluxe reprint on Kickstarter that I'm excited about: La Granja: Deluxe Master Set. Their footprint in my collection will only grow larger I assume.

What it comes down to is the feeling a certain logo on the box elicits. Whether I have veteran, +3.5 weight loving gamers over for a game night, or people that are just venturing into the hobby, I can always pull a B&D game of the shelf and trust it will be a success.
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Sat Dec 18, 2021 6:05 pm
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My top ten favorite publishers - #3

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3 more posts to complete my list of top 10 publishers. Click on the names below to go back to my previous posts.

The list:
4. GMT Games
5. Roxley
6. TMG
7. Awaken Realms
8. Kayenta Games
9. Cranio Creations
10. CMON

The top 3 kicks of with a company that reserves it's seat in my front row because of 1 particular partnership: the work they do with Vital Lacerda and Ian O'Toole. It's Eagle-Gryphon Games.

EGG is one of the publishers that set the bar for deluxe games. If you've ever opened on of their Lacerda games, you know what I mean. There will be people who say that all that bling isn't necessary, but for me it's part of the experience. The one knock I have on them is that they can't seem to get their inserts right, in order to hold sleeved cards. Though the quality of the cards is so good that sleeves are hardly necessary (coming from a compulsive sleever such as me, that's a big endorsement I'd say).

When I came into the hobby, I never would have dreamt that I'd be smitten by games that allow me to manage vineyards (Vinhos Deluxe Edition), an art gallery (The Gallerist), the rebuild of a city devastated by an earthquake (Lisboa) or a car production plant (Kanban EV), but I am intrigued.

Board Game: The Gallerist


Board Game: Kanban EV


Now I'm not a fan of all of Vital's games and hence no longer the owner of Escape Plan or On Mars, but I can't pin that on the publisher. EGG gives me confidence, knowing that whatever the game will be, the production quality will be very good. I'm already looking forward to Weather Machine.

Board Game: Weather Machine


The only non-Lacerda game I own from EGG is their remake of a classic Euro: Rococo: Deluxe Edition. I knew this was a great game, but I missed out on the expansion of the first edition and I loved the game enough to replace my old copy by an EGG jewel.

Board Game: Rococo: Deluxe Edition


The thing that puts them on my list, is at the same time the reason they don't get into my top spot. Yes they are the company that provides me with my Lacerda fix, but in the rest of their portfolio I haven't found enough games that retained their place in my collection. So based on the lack of variety in designers of EGG games that populate my personal collection, I couldn't put them higher than 3rd.

So what 2 publishers jumped ahead of them? I'll see you tomorrow for the first half og the answer to that question.
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Fri Dec 17, 2021 6:05 pm
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My top ten favorite publishers - #4

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6 down, only 4 left to go in my list of favorite publishers. Click on the names below to go back to my previous posts.

The list:
5. Roxley
6. TMG
7. Awaken Realms
8. Kayenta Games
9. Cranio Creations
10. CMON

Number 4 is a kind of an outlier. Where the list above contains know Euro publishers and some thematic/mini oriented houses, the next name doesn't fit any of those labels. GMT Games mainly focusses on war games and other long involved conflict simulations. My introduction to GMT came via 1960: The Making of the President. I was intrigued by the premise of playing out an US presidential election in a board game. I'm also interested in history, so the theme spoke to me. It was all I hoped for and then some. This game was also my introduction into CDG's (card driven games), where your card have a value to pay for standard actions, but also specific events or abilities you could play instead. I was sold on it.

Board Game: 1960: The Making of the President


After 1960, I went on the hunt for more CDB's and GMT had several of those. Off course there's Twilight Struggle, which is very good, but also the underappreciated 1989: Dawn of Freedom, but above all Labyrinth: The War on Terror, 2001 – ?. I have all these on my shelf, but Labyrinth is the finest design in my eyes. It's the most asymmetrical of the bunch, as you have a US player and Jihadi player going at each other, using very different actions and tactics, each pursuing their own set of possible end game triggers.

Board Game: Labyrinth: The War on Terror, 2001 – ?


As I played the CDG's, I got sucked in even deeper when I tried my first COIN (COunter INsurgency) game: A Distant Plain, which tied into Labyrinth, as it's set during the war in Afghanistan. My set of COIN games grew pretty quickly (Gandhi, Fire in the Lake, Falling Sky), and I liked them a lot. However, I also have culled most of them since as my first enthusiasm waned due to the rather long playtime. Next to a A Distant Plain, I retained Liberty or Death: The American Insurrection because of my interest in the time period.

Board Game: A Distant Plain


But it doesn't end there, as I also immensely enjoy SpaceCorp: 2025-2300AD, which is my favorite, mini-free, space game. Just don't ask me to choose my number 1 space game between this and Nemesis . SpaceCorp is a type of game that gives me a strong sense of exploration and advancement. I'm very interested into astronomy, our solar system and other potentially habitable star systems, so this game strikes a special nerve for me.

Board Game: SpaceCorp: 2025-2300AD


Then I still haven't touched on probably my number 1 racing game: Thunder Alley, or GMT's title that takes me back to ancient Rome: Time of Crisis: The Roman Empire in Turmoil, 235-284 AD. Both solid games. And I still have Imperial Struggle patiently waiting on my shelf of opportunity.

In terms of absolute numbers of games, GMT is my top publisher. Even still, I couldn't rank them higher than 4th on my publisher list as the individual games from my top 3 publishers give me even more joy when playing.

As we get higher up on the list, which publishers would you expect are still to come in the next 3 days?
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Thu Dec 16, 2021 6:05 pm
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My top ten favorite publishers - #5

Vadim Deylgat
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Melle
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Getting closer to my top publisher. Click on the names below to go back to my previous posts.

The list:
6. TMG
7. Awaken Realms
8. Kayenta Games
9. Cranio Creations
10. CMON

I start of the top 5 with a Canadian company: Roxley. They don't put out that many games, but what they produce is top notch.

On of my all time favorite games is Brass. And that dating back to before Roxley decided to reprint the game and make a second version. Brass: Lancashire and Brass: Birmingham rank high for me, both in appreciation as in number of plays. The job Roxley did on these is nothing less than superb. These deluxe editions also gave me a taste of using poker chips, their Iron Clays, as currency in games. I now have 3 full sets of those, with different denominations, able to suit my every need in board game currency.

From gallery of Midav8


Board Game Accessory: Iron Clays


The other hit for me is Dice Throne, which is part of the select group of games that got me through the lockdown(s), since you can very easily play some duels over Zoom/Skype with someone who has some of it. However, I must admit that Dice Throne Adventures did fall a bit flat for me. Nice concept and all, but DT is meant as a dueling game first and that shows. I'm still debating whether to go in on the pledge manager for Marvel Dice Throne.

Board Game: Dice Throne: Season Two – Battle Chest


Picture courtesy of @DICE_COLLECTOR

Roxley is always on my radar and while I don't buy all of their games, when they announce a new title, I do listen.
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Wed Dec 15, 2021 6:05 pm
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My top ten favorite publishers - #6

Vadim Deylgat
Belgium
Melle
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Microbadge: Lisboa fanMicrobadge: I'm obsessed with Obsession!Microbadge: I play games at Meeples in Ghent.Microbadge: 5 Year Geek VeteranMicrobadge: Capstone Games fan
The daily list of my favorite publishers is halfway done after this post. Click on the names below to go back to my previous posts.

The list:
7. Awaken Realms
8. Kayenta Games
9. Cranio Creations
10. CMON

Number 6 marks a return to Euro games, but it comes with a touch of sadness. Tasty Minstrel Games. I already wrote a piece on them back in August when it was becoming clear that they would stop publishing games. Recently they put up their remaining stock up for sale at Coolstuffinc and that is going to be that. Maybe some titles get picked up by other publishers, but most of their portfolio will go out of print. I was genuinely amazed how many TMG games I own and like. I wasn't half as aware how much I liked their work until I started looking at my shelves for the dragon logo.

There's the trifecta of western themed games: Gold West, Pioneer Days and Old West Empresario. All good games with varying degrees of player interaction and different sets of mechanisms. Come to think of it, maybe I should set up a dedicated game night and schedule all 3 of them back to back.

Board Game: Pioneer Days


Then there's Guilds of London, for which I'm still hunting down the expansion. I love the combo of hand management and area majority.

Board Game: Guilds of London

Picture courtesy of @sverbeure

And I can't forget Crusaders: Thy Will Be Done with it's player specific rondel mechanism. Great design.

Board Game: Crusaders: Thy Will Be Done


And I even have a filler game from them that hits the table regularly: Solar Draft.

Board Game: Solar Draft

Picture courtesy of @slugger404

This shows that TMG had a wide array of games on offer that speak to me. They also reprinted Colosseum (but I still prefer my Days of Wonder version). I also enjoyed Eminent Domain and I was so foolish to get rid of Yokohama, but I corrected that mistake by re-acquiring it in a trade this week. And can you believe I've never even tried Orléans? Maybe I should also correct that last misstep.

In retrospect, TMG was the kind of company that knew to push the right buttons for me, even though I never consciously looked for their next releases. When I look at my top 10, this was the one company where, in my head, the games where very much detached from the brand that put them to market. And now they're gone.
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Tue Dec 14, 2021 6:05 pm
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