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My games collection and the stories behind the games

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Games for Two #3

Brian Moore
United Kingdom
Bolton
Lancashire
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Games for Two

With Covid not quite gone, Solo and Two Player Games are proving to be quite popular.

There is a section on BGG named Family: Two Player Only Games.
However there are over 22000 games in this list with no easy way to determine which are in the collection besides trolling through all 22000 listed there.

But, I’ve now found a way to find 2-player games in the collection, using the Advanced Search on BGG, by entering 2-2 in the player count field, so hopefully that has worked.

These are the previous blogs in this series:
Games For Two #1, Games for Two #2

These are the Games for Two in the collection

Board Game: Canopy
Board Game: Canopy

Canopy (2021) by Tim Eisner is a game in which two players compete to grow the most bountiful rainforest. The jungle ecosystem is full of symbiosis and mutualism, and players must grow tall trees and lush jungle plants to attract the most diverse wildlife. By carefully selecting what grows in your forest, you can create the ideal balance of flora and fauna and develop a thriving rainforest.
In the game, players take turns selecting new cards for their forest from three growth piles. Each time you look at a pile, you may select it and add those cards to your rainforest tableau, or return the pile face down, adding one additional card to it. As the piles grow, you must search for the plants and animals that will benefit your forest the most — but choose carefully as the jungle also contains dangers in the form or fire, disease, and drought.
After reading about this game in Caroline Black's blog The Dyslexic Gamer, I just had to get a copy and I love everything about this game. which is super tight and polished.

Board Game: Dungeon Twister
Board Game: Dungeon Twister

Dungeon Twister (2004) by Christophe Boelinger is a 2-player high level strategy game where 2 teams of adventurers with various powers are trapped in a dungeon. The board is composed of 8 rooms that can be moved and rotated by the players. Each turn, a player is able to spend actions to move around the dungeon, pick up and use items, battle with the opponents team, or turn and move the rooms of the dungeon.
This 2 player game is very strategic, with little luck, and makes for a good tournament game.
There have been several expansions for the game and you can find out more about them here: Expansions of Dungeon Twister

Board Game: Stratego
Board Game: Stratego

Stratego (1946) The gameboard is your battlefield. You have an army of men at your disposal and six bombs. Your mission--protect your flag and capture your opponent's flag.
Secretly place your men, bombs, and flag on the gameboard with these objectives in mind. But remember your opponent is doing the same thing, so you must plan a defense as well as an offense.
Once the armies are in place, advance your men. When you're one space away from an enemy, attack. You and your opponent declare ranks. The lower-ranking man is captured and out of play.
This game has been around for many years and been re-printed many times by different companies, the last English edition in 2019, with another due in 2022. This has been one of my favourite games over the years, and despite all the gaming goodness in my collection, it still has remained a favourite.

Board Game: Blue Moon
Board Game: Blue Moon

Blue Moon (2004) by Reiner Knizia is for two players. It is not a CCG as there are no random cards in any expansion. It can thus be regarded as the first LCG, although it doesn't use that term. It is one of the games in the Kosmos 2-player series.
It is set in the fictional world of Blue Moon, where different peoples fight for dominance of the world and the favour of the Dragons.
Each people has its own unique traits and gameplay mechanics, and is represented by a 30 card deck.
I simply love this game. There are so many challenges and options that each play of this game is fun and exciting, and with all the expansions there is plenty of variety.
In 2014, it was reimplemented as...

Board Game: Blue Moon Legends
Board Game: Blue Moon Legends

Blue Moon Legends (2014) by Reiner Knizia is a collected version of Blue Moon (2004), Reiner Knizia's classic card game for two players! In Blue Moon Legends, you will gather the allegiance of one of the peoples of Blue Moon City, then lead them in a series of fights against another people.
This is the same Blue Moon we all know and love, although playing on the standard sized cards feels a bit cramped after having played the luxurious original edition, but all the art is the same, though, which is key. Blue Moon Legends contains all cards from award-winning Blue Moon card game but in a single box.

Board Game: Chess
Board Game: Chess

Chess (1475) is a two-player, abstract strategy board game that represents medieval warfare on an 8x8 board with alternating light and dark squares. Opposing pieces, traditionally designated White and Black, are initially lined up on either side. Each type of piece has a unique form of movement and capturing occurs when a piece, via its movement, occupies the square of an opposing piece. Players take turns moving one of their pieces in an attempt to capture, attack, defend, or develop their positions.
I've been playing Chess on and off for many years and still not very good at it. At work, I used to play with a guy on lunch breaks who was much better than me and always won, but still I kept up with it. Eventually as my games collection grew I could no longer put in the time or effort to get better at it, but still have several chess sets in one form or another - even a Disney set!

Board Game: Jambo
Board Game: Jambo

Jambo (2004) by Rüdiger Dorn was first produced by Kosmos in 2004 as part of their 2-player series and was then picked up and produced in English by Rio Grande Games.
Players take on the role of merchants offering their wares from market stands. On a player's turn, he has five actions to choose from. Actions can be used to draw cards, play cards, and activate build-up cards. The game's attraction lies with the many special cards.
This is one of my favourite Kosmos 2 player games and I also own: Jambo ExpansionJambo Expansion (2007) and Jambo Expansion 2Jambo Expansion 2 (2009).
In 2013 Asante was released and is a two-player game set in the world of Jambo and Waka Waka (2012) from the same designer and artist as those games.

Board Game: Morels
Board Game: Morels

Morels (2012) by Brent Povis is a strategic card game for two players, uses two decks: a Day Deck (84 cards) that includes ten different types of mushrooms as well as baskets, cider, butter, pans, and moons; and a smaller Night Deck (8 cards) of mushrooms to be foraged by moonlight. Each mushroom card has two values: one for selling and one for cooking. Selling two or more like mushrooms grants foraging sticks that expand your options in the forest, enabling offensive or defensive plays that change with every game played.
This is easy to pick up and play but the tactics can be quite subtle and pleasingly tense. Comes in a Kosmos 2-player size box.
In 2017 it was renamed Fungi, with an English version in 2019.

Board Game: Catan Card Game
Board Game: Catan Card Game

Catan Card Game (1996) by Klaus Teuber bears only a slight resemblance to The Settlers of Catan, the original game in the Catan series. There are six resources: wool, wood, bricks, grain, ore, and gold. Before beginning the game, the players receive six square cards showing the resources, with a different die number on each card. In addition, the players start the game with two village cards and a road card connecting them. There are card stacks of more roads and villages, as well as cities, to be purchased during the game. With each new village or city comes two new resource cards. Villages and cities give victory points.
The theme and strategy is quite in depth, and you do not have to depend on other players. Also, as it is only for two players, it makes it quite fun this way.
In 2010 it was reimplemented as Rivals for Catan that completely reworked many of the original card game's mechanics to make it easier for newcomers to play the game.

Board Game: Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation
Board Game: Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation

Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation (2002) by Reiner Knizia is an asymmetrical Stratego-like game themed around The Lord of the Rings. Each player controls a force of 9 unique characters (light vs. dark) whose identities are hidden from their opponent at the beginning of the game. Each player also starts with a hand of 9 unique cards, which are used in resolving combats as the characters move out across the board.
This is a great game to pass a little time with. This game offers a surprising amount of strategy and fun for how amazingly simple it is.
In 2005 it was given a deluxe edition Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation comprising the original characters and a full set of new characters.

Board Game: Codenames: Duet
Board Game: Codenames: Duet

Codenames: Duet (2017) by Vlaada Chvátil keeps the basic elements of Codenames (2015) — give one-word clues to try to get someone to identify your agents among those on the table — but now you're working together as a team to find all of your agents.
Collectively, you need to reveal all fifteen agents — without revealing an assassin — before time runs out in order to win the game. Either player can decide to give the first one-word clue to the other player, along with a number. Whoever receives the clue places a finger on a card to identify that agent. If correct, they can attempt to identify another one. If they identify a bystander, then their guessing time ends. If they identify an assassin, you both lose!
Anne and I really like this and I think this is my favourite version of Codenames so far. I love that the cooperative nature of the game and clue giving really cuts out most of the downtime.


The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Fri Jun 24, 2022 12:00 pm
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Category: Economic #13

Brian Moore
United Kingdom
Bolton
Lancashire
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BGG Description Economic games encourage players to manage a system of production, distribution, trade, and/or consumption of goods. The games usually simulate a market in some way. The term is often used interchangeably with resource management games.

Here are the past blogs in this series:
Category: Economic #1, Category: Economic #2,Category: Economic #3, Category: Economic #4,Category: Economic #5, Category: Economic #6,Category: Economic #7, Category: Economic #8, Category: Economic #9, Category: Economic #10, Category: Economic #11, Category: Economic #12

BGG has listed over 7000 games with an economic category.
Of these, there are over 700 in the collection, so as you can tell, another of my favourite topics.

Board Game: Bootleggers
Board Game: Bootleggers

Bootleggers (2004) where players take on the role of enterprising bosses seeking to make a name for themselves in the illegal alcohol trade at the height of the 1920's prohibition era. Deceit, lies, and alliances of convenience are the norm as players attempt to control distribution through money and corruption by muscling in on the competition, paying off the local law authorities, building underground speakeasies, and shipping trucks of "hooch"!
As mobsters during prohibition, you are producing, shipping, and selling illegal booze. At its heart, it's an economic game with a criminal side. First to $100,000 wins.

Board Game: Forge War
Board Game: Forge War

Forge War (2015) by Isaac Childres where players will take on the role of blacksmiths in a kingdom rife with marauding harpies, cursed dungeons and fire-breathing dragons. They are charged with gathering ore from the mines, purchasing weapon designs from the market and then using these resources to forge weapons for adventurers who will go on quests to fight back the ever-deepening darkness. If the adventurers are successful, they will return with more ore, money and other rewards with which players can invest back into their burgeoning weapon-smithing empire.
The standard game ends a bit too soon, and the epic game is where it really shines. The game makes you think several turns ahead with the feel of an economic game and there is enough player interaction to keep it interesting, without being totally vicious.

Board Game: Urban Sprawl
Board Game: Urban Sprawl

Urban Sprawl (2011) by Chad Jensen is a game for 2–4 players. It abstractly models the growth of a town into a teeming metropolis, through the use of cards that depict permits. Players strive to become dominant in one or more building Zones in order to acquire beneficial political offices.
All of this eventually leads to the end game—a vibrant metropolis that is revered around the world—when the player with the most Prestige will be crowned the winner.
Simple and elegant rules result in a city development game. This is a great game. People have argued that there is a lot of randomness in the game, but the purpose of the game is to handle this randomness. It is not a luck game. It is a strategy game.

Board Game: World Without End
Board Game: World Without End

World Without End (2009) by Michael Rieneck is based on the novel by Ken Follett, a sequel to his bestselling The Pillars of the Earth. This is the 2009 game in the Kosmos line of literature-based games.
World Without End shares the Kingsbridge location of the earlier novel, but occurs 200 years later. Similarly, the game shares many themes but is a new standalone game.
As citizens of Kingsbridge, players need to take care of the following areas: Building, Trading, Religion, Feeding, and Medical Knowledge. Each turn an event card is flipped that defines available player actions. Victory points can be won in numerous ways, e.g. by creating buildings or taking care of sick people.
I haven't read the book but the narrative is atmospheric, and the feeling of just about getting through in a tough medieval world is rendered so well. The event cards can make life tough and undermine strategies but that is what makes the game so great.

Board Game: Noria
Board Game: Noria

Noria (2017) by Sophia Wagner is set in an entirely new steampunk universe designed specifically for this game. At the centre of the game is an innovative mechanism called "wheel building". Each player has an action wheel consisting of three rings, with slots for a number of different action discs. Over the course of the game, players try to obtain new discs and manipulate the rings of the wheel to optimize their action selection. Additionally, to ensure their investments bear fruit, they also need to bribe politicians with knowledge.
Noria is primarily an economic Euro and it can appear complicated and obtuse upon your first encounter. However, the theme is interesting and the main mechanic kind of goes well with the theme too. There is no luck in this game! If you play better than others, you will mostly win.

Board Game: Hansa
Board Game: Hansa

Hansa (2004) by Michael Schacht where players are merchants of the Hanseatic League. Players take control of the ship and buy and sell goods, establish trading posts, and sail to find new markets. The board is a very simple map of Scandinavia, with arrows from point to point restricting where the boat is able to move. The active player takes control of the boat and must pay to move to each new city where he may either buy, sell, or expand. Players want sets of goods that they can trade for victory points, but also need to expand their market presence to generate revenue.
This is an economic game with a number of twists, it just seems to get better with every play.

Board Game: The Palaces of Carrara
Board Game: The Palaces of Carrara

The Palaces of Carrara (2012) by Michael Kiesling & Wolfgang Kramer where players want to buy the marble from this famous region of Italy as cheaply as possible – but any reduction in price will benefit opponents as well. Maybe you'll find it profitable to instead invest in the buildings created from this marble? Maybe it'll be more worthwhile to grab the expensive raw material when bigger buildings in town turn out to be not so lucrative?
This is not your typical Euro where you build a nice economic engine and ride its efficiency to 200 victory points over the course of several rounds. Since you have imperfect knowledge of the progress made by your opponents towards the end game conditions, you must be on your toes at all times.

Board Game: Legacy: The Testament of Duke de Crecy
Board Game: Legacy: The Testament of Duke de Crecy

Legacy: The Testament of Duke de Crecy (2013) enables you to build a powerful dynasty in 18th century France as you step into the shoes of a French noble and compete for lasting honor. Over three generations, you – a resourceful patriarch or matriarch – will attempt to create a lasting legacy by establishing a house with ties to many different wealthy and powerful families from France and abroad (Spain, Italy, Russia and other countries).
Legacy goes about gaining VPs in a unique way. Instead of placing workers, gathering resources from a central board, and building your farm (or whatever) like you do in most Economic games, Legacy requires that you constantly sacrifice various resources for other resources, which might then be sacrificed again at a later turn. I actually don't mind "point salad" Economic games but I know a lot of BGGers dislike them, but I guess that comes from me being a Feld fan!

Board Game: Martians: A Story of Civilization
Board Game: Martians: A Story of Civilization

Martians: A Story of Civilization (2016) The first expedition to Mars ended with a heroic fight by the astronauts for survival and initiated the first mission aimed at colonizing the planet, which was financed by four corporations. Now the human colony on Mars, managed by leaders of the corporations, has to explore the planet in search of necessary resources, build new constructions, and develop technologies adjusted to planetary conditions. Such effort is necessary not only to survive, but also to create better living standards for future generations raised by colonists.
This game is a great worker placement, resource management and survival game where like in Robinson Crusoe there is a lot of re-playability due to the diversity of missions in the game (KS edition, which also has minis).
Be sure to download the 2nd edition of the rules as 1st edition rules have several errors..

Board Game: The Speicherstadt
Board Game: The Speicherstadt

The Speicherstadt (2010) by Stefan Feld is an auction card game. Players compete for victory points, which come mainly from contracts. Players bid for cards by creating rows with their meeples over them. Each meeple in a row increases the cost of a card - but only for players "below" it. This is the main mechanic of the game - players must consider when to bid (place their meeple) over a certain card and when to use their meeples to make others pay more. This is important, because a player can make only three bids during a round. Cards feature contracts and resources used to fulfil those contracts and other special cards.
I've played this game with war-gamers, economic gamers, and abstract gamers and all have enjoyed the hard-thinking, hints of bluffing, and straight-forward nature of the game. It provides a lot of brain-burning for a genuine 45 minutes of play.


The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Thu Jun 23, 2022 12:00 pm
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Cover Art: Castles #4

Brian Moore
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Bolton
Lancashire
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Cover Art: Castles

This off-beat series will look at box cover art and similarities on a theme. In compiling these blogs I’ve been noticing common features in the artwork which coincidentally are similar.

Many of these games will have appeared in my recent series Category Medieval, but not all of those feature Castles in there cover art, so this series will focus on castles or fortified cities.

Previous blogs in this series are here:
Cover Art: Castles #1, Cover Art: Castles #2, Cover Art: Castles #3

Board Game: Castle




Castle (2000) by Bruno Faidutti revisits the medieval setting of Citadels with the card game Castle. Players are given a set of square cards which are to be played onto the table, which has a cardboard castle battlement layout.

Cards are played into one of four regions: in the courtyard, on the battlements, on the towers, or outside the castle. And when played, the cards will usually allow you to take some sort of special action, which is unique to the card you played. The first player to rid himself of all his cards wins, which can be a tricky proposition at best.

A very enjoyable game that's quick and easy to set up and play. Castle is also lots of fun!

Not much of the castle walls can be seen, but they are there in the background.






Board Game: Kreta




Kreta (2005) by Stefan Dorra Players use different character cards to bring in and move pieces around Kreta which give them influence in the provinces on the island. One of the cards triggers scoring in all the provinces adjacent to a place, and each province gives various Victory Points (VPs) to the 1st and 2nd most influence.

At any time, you only know the next two places that will score, so if you cannot gain influence the current place, you can prepare for the next scoring.

Each player has an identical set of characters, and each character controls certain pieces which have different abilities and limitations in the game. By smart use of your characters and clever timing, you can try to have the scoring occur when you have the most influence, and gain more VPs than the other players.

A good balance of area majority, difficult decisions, role selection, and dynamic game flow. Fun, tactical, and full of replay value.

The castle is quite prominent on this cover, on the left of the image.





Board Game: Ivanhoe




Ivanhoe (2000) by Reiner Knizia where players take on the role of a knight and join the prestigious tournaments at the king's court. Use your cards to win the jousting competitions, and to fight with your sword, axe or morning-star. Rally your squires, gain the support of a maiden, and play action cards against your opponents.

Clever use of action cards can change the type of tournament that is in progress. One card will 'unhorse' you, forcing everyone still in the jousting competition to switch to a weapon battle of the action card holder’s choice.

This seems like a take-that luck fest that lasts too long. And it can be if your group plays it that way. But if you look underneath the surface, you'll find that Ivanhoe is deeper than it first appears.

This was a reimplementation of the earlier Attacke (1993) and was then reimplemented as Gem Dealer (2008) and reimplemented again in 2015 as Pan tu nie stał! Demoludy.

The castle can be seen in the background of the cover image.





Board Game: Round House




Round House (2016) round houses (a.k.a., Fujian Tulou) are unique rural dwellings that can be found in the mountain areas in southeastern Fujian, China, dating back to the Ming dynasty (17th century). A round house is a large, multi-floor, enclosed, and fortified earth building (castle) housing usually a whole clan, which functions as a village and is known as "a little kingdom for the family".

In the game Round House, players are the head of a family who tries to lead their members to glory. Players take turns moving their pawns around the circular building in one direction, performing different actions to get goods, trade goods for money, hire experts, send family members for distant business, and eventually bring the families home to worship the ancestors. By cleverly moving your pawns around the round house and maximizing the performance of your faithful family members, you might become the most glorious family and win the game!

A great game, if you're into heavy Euro-style worker placement - and willing to cope with the 'lost in translation' rules, in places. However, any queries and the answers can be found here on BGG, of course. Graphics, game play, "feeling" - just great! Deserves a much better appreciation!

Can't miss the Round House in the background, looking similar to our western castles, so qualifies for me!



Board Game: Eketorp




Eketorp (2007) by Dirk Henn where players build Viking strongholds upon the Swedish island of Öland.
The goal of the game is to collect the most valuable blocks to build your own fortress, either by winning battles on the resource spaces or by stealing blocks from other Vikings.

Each turn, new resources appear and the players secretly plan their viking movements. After all the placements are revealed, Vikings battle each other for blocks (with the losers sent off to the field hospital to recover). The game ends after a set number of rounds, or when one of the players has succeeded in finishing their fortress.

When I first introduced this, the initial response to this was very positive. There is lots of player interaction, with quality components, and just plain fun and this keeps the game being played.

Another non-European style castle in the background, but it worked for the Vikings of old to keep people out.







Board Game: Noblemen

Noblemen (2012) In the mid-sixteenth century England, Queen Elizabeth I rules without an heir. This leaves room for some maneuvering. Powers throughout, including you, believe that a family with great presence, wealth, and nobility might find itself in the right place at the right time.

In Noblemen, you are members of the British aristocracy. You will try to achieve influence and prestige for your family. You will grow your family's estate, earn the queen's favor, bear witness to scandalous behavior, gain influence with the church, bribe royalty, and leverage your political weight during masquerade balls, all in an effort to ensure your family's rightful place in history. After three decades, the player with the most victory points will be declared the winner.

This is a game of several races all going on at the same time. Players race the clock; you will never know exactly how many turns are remaining before the scoring round. Players will race each other – to build cheaper buildings, to be the first to build a folly, to have more prestige and therefore gain a higher noble title, and more.

A strategy eurogame with a novel twist: you almost know when the round is going to end - except that your nasty fellow players may force it upon you at a most inconvenient time!

Back to European style castles now with this cover image and rather grand it is too!


Board Game: The King's Abbey

The King's Abbey (2016) In AD 1096, hope fills the air like a bird's song after a long winter, the seeming endless road of the Dark Ages may soon come to an end. For years now, warlords have roamed the land, every surface is covered with filth, and disease has ripped through towns like great tornadoes.

Recently, while on one of his crusades, King Sivolc met a master architect named Elias. Elias told the King about his devotion to the mortar arts and how he longed to build a structure so great that people would travel hundreds of miles just to gaze at it.

The King's Abbey is a worker placement/resource management game in which each player has their own player board that represents the abbey they have been tasked to build. Players take charge of monks that are represented by ten dice as they go out and gather resources, go on crusades, construct buildings, train clergy, bring in peasants, and defend their abbey against the darkness. Each player does this by rolling their dice and then assigning each die (monk) to different places on their player board, resource boards, and crusade cards.

This has dice as workers, resource management, and group challenges. This is just a really good WP game.

Not really a castle, but abbeys were the castles of the day for the monks.


Board Game: Robber Knights




Robber Knights (2005) by Rüdiger Dorn
The knights set off from their castles to conquer the surrounding land. For the wealth of the big towns and the villages belonging to them is just too tempting.

Of course, once in possession, no knight wants to lose his newly acquired properties, so this means: caution. For the other players knights are awake to any opportunity and the newly gained land may be lost again just as quickly to a new lord.

Bring your landscape tiles and above all your knights skilfully into play, secure your properties on all sides and watch out for enemy knights at all time.

This plays really well with 2 and loses little with 3 or 4 (although a beginner can pass a good move along to the next player). The way that your draw stack is built greatly minimizes the luck in the game as long as you know what's in each tile group.

What more looks right for this period in history than a knight charging out of the castle gates. A good cover image.




Board Game: Feudality

Feudality (2012) by Tom Wham A long time ago in Europe, ages were pretty dark. The distribution of wealth back then left a lot to be desired. Greedy people banded together to take things from other people so that the rich could get richer and the poor could have even less. Twas ever thus. Step into the middle of the normal state of human affairs as a Baron or Baroness somewhere almost in Europe a long time ago. Thanks to your birth you have a lot of little people working to make you richer, and you, in turn, are doing your best to make your king even more prosperous. If you do things right, you might someday be king.

Each player starts with a Fiefdom Management card, divided into 64 squares (49 of which can have tiles played on them. Into four of these squares you deploy your Keep, in which you will put your fortification of some sort, and your soldiers. Elsewhere in your land you deploy assorted resource gatherers and buildings in an effort to grow, prosper, and score victory points. Along the way there may be wars, invasions, tournaments, taxes, and a lot of other nonsense.

The theme is old, the mechanics are known, but the game is just pure fun to play. Attacking one another with a smile. Let dragons and giants destroy the realms of others. Sighing simultaneously when the king is going to visit his brother, and so on. Possibly my favourite Tom Wham game that just doesn't get mentioned enough.

The castle may be in the far distance, but there it is up the path and on the hilltop.




Board Game: Patrician

Patrician (2007) by Michael Schacht takes place in the Middle Ages when men were men and wealthy men were inspired to build magnificent towers in order to show off how prosperous they were. As the old saying goes, the taller the tower, the more influential the family.

Players are master builders trying to profit from these vanity-driven families. You build these towers floor by floor, ready to take credit for making them look good. From Mayfair Games’s description of the game: “You must shrewdly accept the building orders of the patrician families to position yourself in the right place at the right time. Play your cards right, and your name will be famous among the rich and powerful!”

The board represents a number of cities, each of which will have 2 towers when the games ends. Players have a hand of 3 cards, each indicating one city. Playing a card allows that player to add a tower piece to the city indicated by the card. Each city will have a specific number of tower pieces. When the specified number of pieces are played to the city, the city is complete.

A good area majority and set collection game. I like it's simplicity, and it's choices, yet plays in less than an hour.


The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Wed Jun 22, 2022 12:00 pm
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Category: Nautical #4

Brian Moore
United Kingdom
Bolton
Lancashire
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Category Nautical

BGG Description Nautical games involve sailors, ships, and/or maritime navigation as a major component of the theme or gameplay. Most Nautical games require players to effectively control ships as an objective.

There are over 3000 games on BGG with this category

Here are the previous blogs in this series:
Category: Nautical #1, Category: Nautical #2, Category: Nautical #3

Here are the ones in the collection with this category (and no doubt we’ll come across pirates along the way!)

Board Game: Niagara
Board Game: Niagara

Niagara (2004) is set in the not particularly safe world of rushing waterfalls. In the late 18th Century, the Shawnee and Iroquois Indians pointed white Desperadoes, Mercenaries and Adventurers in the direction of hidden caches of valuable jewels, in the hopes of turning them against one another and away from their territorial expansion ambitions. Players play as some of those Adventurers. The first player to be able to claim ownership of five jewels is the winner.
However, the chase after the riches has some snags. The speed of the river is always changing, since the speed depends on the decisions of the players and the changeable weather. And once a canoe goes over the falls, it's a hefty investment to replace it.
A very tight and challenging game. I love the player interaction with the weather and gem stealing. This is a real favourite. Each paddle card decision is excruciating, and knowing when to play the weather card is key to not getting swept over the waterfall!

Board Game: The Oracle of Delphi
Board Game: The Oracle of Delphi

The Oracle of Delphi (2016) by Stefan Feld where the player's ships travel across a large modular game board of hexagonal tiles showing islands and the surrounding waters. Each player aims to reach certain islands to perform the twelve tasks given by Zeus.
To perform these colour-dependent actions, you are given three coloured dice, the so-called "oracle dice". Rolling the dice (at the start of the turn) is equivalent to consulting the oracle, whereas the results represent her answers. The answers determine which actions you will be able to take, but you will always have three actions per turn.
Not a point salad game that Feld is known for, but a race game. Trying to complete tasks before everyone else and get to the finish. Love the dice and the goals.

Board Game: Islebound
Board Game: Islebound

Islebound (2016) by Ryan Laukat where you take command of a ship and crew. You sail to island towns, collecting resources, hiring crew, and commissioning buildings for your capital city. Each building has a unique ability, and your combination of buildings can greatly enhance your strength as a trader, builder, or invader. You also recruit pirates and sea monsters to conquer towns, which, once conquered, allow you to complete the town action for free, and charge a fee to opponents if they want to use it.
At its heart this is a pickup-and-deliver game, but with a bunch of other things piled on top, and it works. In addition to sailing around for resources, you can conquer cities, build buildings, accomplish quests, etc. There's a lot going on, but you usually only need to look ahead a few turns.

Board Game: Manila
Board Game: Manila

Manila (2005) by Franz-Benno Delonge Barges, freight and profits are what it's all about in Manila, a speculative contest for 3-5 players. Goods shipments, intended for transport along sea routes, are in danger of gathering dust in the warehouses or being lost at sea in a storm. While the players speculate about success and failure, the ultimate fate of the ships will be determined by the dice.
There are four shipments that need to get to Manila - jade, ginseng, silk and nutmeg. A round begins with an initial auction to become harbour master. If you win, you'll be allowed to buy a share of one of the shipments, choose which three shipments you'd like to take down river and how likely they are to make it to their destination in the harbour. If they make it to Manila, their share price will increase. The aim of the game is to bet on the outcome of these shipments, with dice ultimately determining their fate.
This is an underrated game, IMO. This game is about economics and speculation, and a great game. In Manila you can even hedge your position when playing at the insurance house. Perfect! As the harbour master you are an insider trader, and you pay (or bribe) for the asymmetric information.

Board Game: Shipyard
Board Game: Shipyard

Shipyard (2009) by Vladimír Suchý We’re now in the 19th century, sea transport is more and more important. Both corporations and naval forces require newer and newer ships. Try to put yourself in the role of their manufacturers. Hire employees, buy accessories, get favour of evaluating committees. Don’t forget to rent a canal and you can heave anchor.
Players take turns, beginning with a randomly selected player and continuing around the table clockwise. On their turn, they will choose one of the available actions from the Action Track. The action will get the player something they need to help build their ships. On the player's next turn, they will move that Action Card ahead of all the others and choose a different action.
I think this game is great. The amount of interlocking mechanisms that create a flow that still feels natural, and the amount of planning involved, gives you lots of different strategies to explore.

Board Game: Hansa
Board Game: Hansa

Hansa (2004) by Michael Schacht where players are merchants of the Hanseatic League. Players take control of the ship and buy and sell goods, establish trading posts, and sail to find new markets. The board is a very simple map of Scandinavia, with arrows from point to point restricting where the boat is able to move. The active player takes control of the boat and must pay to move to each new city where he may either buy, sell, or expand. Players want sets of goods that they can trade for victory points, but also need to expand their market presence to generate revenue.
This is a great game and its amazing that such a simple game can be so much fun and have so much depth. One of Schacht's best designs.

Board Game: Panamax
Board Game: Panamax

Panamax (2014) each player manages a shipping company established in the Colón Free Trade Zone. Companies accept contracts from both US coasts, China and Europe and deliver cargo in order to make money, attract investment and pay dividends. At the same time the players accumulate their own stock investments and try to make as much money as possible in an effort to have the largest personal fortune and win the game.
Very happy to have this in my collection and have enjoyed many plays.

Board Game: Loot
Board Game: Loot

Loot (1992) by Reiner Knizia The cards show trading ships and pirate ships, with pirates and an admiral. Players send a trading ship of value on a voyage in which it must survive a round of attacks from other player's pirate ships. You defend your traders with your own pirates and collect the spoils of your attacks elsewhere.
A good family game and plays best with at least 3. My version is from 2005 by Gamewright that I picked up in 2008.

Board Game: Blackbeard
Board Game: Blackbeard

Blackbeard (1991) by Richard H. Berg recreates "The Golden Age of Piracy" at the turn of the 18th century. Each player becomes one or more pirates and attempts to amass a fortune and retire before a King's Commissioner tracks him down, a Warship stumbles across him, or his own crew cuts his throat! Merchant ships plying the trade routes are the targets. Prizes range from near-worthless supplies to the fabulous Spanish and Mogul treasure ships. Luck, skill and cunning all play a part as you comb the Seven Seas (well ... at least three of them) for fame and fortune.
Like many AH games it requires dedication and patience, but the reward is a very deep game. If you like games that strive to represent the complexity of reality and teach you something, this is for you.
In 2008 GMT reimplemented the game as Blackbeard: The Golden Age of Piracy and Richard Berg took the original and redesigned it, almost entirely, to bring it into line with what gamers like to see and play these days.

Board Game: Wooden Ships & Iron Men
Board Game: Wooden Ships & Iron Men

Wooden Ships & Iron Men (1974) Fighting ships in the age of sail! This classic title details military engagements in the golden age of sail with a plethora of historical scenarios. Players take their groups of ships and form their ship lines and then go at it. The game comes with a large generic ocean map overlaid with a hex grid.
Probably a bit dated and overpassed by computer simulations. However, a brilliant design for its time.


The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Tue Jun 21, 2022 12:00 pm
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Category: Ancient #9

Brian Moore
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Bolton
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Category Ancient

BGG Description
Ancient games often have themes or storylines set in the Old World, between 3000 BC (the beginning of the Egyptian dynasties) and AD 476 (the fall of the Western Roman Empire). Some of the themes and imagery found in the most popular Ancient games concerns ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman civilizations.

The previous blogs in this series are here:
Category: Ancient #1, Category: Ancient #2, Category: Ancient #3, Category: Ancient #4, Category: Ancient #5, Category: Ancient #6, Category: Ancient #7, Category: Ancient #8

BGG has over 2600 games listed in this category

Some of these have found my way into the collection and I've listed them chronologically for a change.

Board Game: Peloponnes
Board Game: Peloponnes

Peloponnes (2009) by Bernd Eisenstein where players take control of the civilizations of ancient Greece. Through auctions in each of the 8 rounds, the players develop their civilizations, adding territory through Land Tiles and prestigious buildings through the Building Tiles. These increase the civilizations' inhabitants, luxury, wealth and power. Luxury goods allow flexibility in providing for a player's population, while some tiles also offer protection against the many disasters that happen during the game.
This a light-medium weight auction/civilization game that makes everything works perfectly fine together.
The rules are simple to learn, but oh so hard to master. It is way deeper than it looks like at first glance because there are just so many options to choose from and to manage.
I've loved this game since I first bought it in 2009 and have all the expansions for it - all 11 of them.
In 2015 Peloponnes Box was released containing all expansions up to that point, so includes all expansions except the 2017 release Peloponnes: Heroes and Colonies

Board Game: Nile
Board Game: Nile

Nile (2009) consists of 92 cards. There are 5 suits each representing a resource type in Egypt. There are also specialty cards showing multiple resource types. Players draft cards into their hands and play them following simple rules. At the beginning of every turn a flood card is drawn showing one or more resource type. That resource type is harvested by the player currently growing it.
I like this game, it entertains me more than other regular card games, even though it depends more on luck and anything else.
In 2011 it was reimplemented as Nile DeLuxor and includes a new expansion in the box.

Board Game: Keltis: Der Weg der Steine Mitbringspiel
Board Game: Keltis: Der Weg der Steine Mitbringspiel

Keltis: Der Weg der Steine Mitbringspiel (2009) by Reiner Knizia In this stand-alone small box "travel version" of Keltis the familiar rules and forms are mixed with some push-your-luck element. Every turn, players flip a stone tile to its face up side. They have to decide whether they continue a path of stones, or simply leave it at its position. Instead of flipping a new stone tile, players may decide to take one that is already flipped. The larger the path of stones, the more points a player scores.
This is Keltis simplified to a no-hand game (with tiles rather than cards), and the game works a treat.

Board Game: The Golden City
Board Game: The Golden City

The Golden City (2009) by Michael Schacht From far away, the adventurers have come to the island with the golden city in its centre. Just arrived, they open up the first shop directly at the coast. Already it is possible to open up other ones in the villages along the street connections.
That's worth it because through that you'll get goods, keys, money, and concessions that you need for getting ahead. And finally the first is able to establish himself in the golden City and thus get the most precious trading contracts.
A solid Schacht game, and I tend to really like most of his designs, and this one is no exception. Time to play is quick and there is a good feeling of rushing to acquire what you'll need for the following turn.
This was Part One of "The Gold Trilogy" (besides Valdora (2009) and Felinia (2010).

Board Game: Egizia
Board Game: Egizia

Egizia (2009) The players are builders in Ancient Egypt, competing to get the most fame building different monuments requested by the Pharaoh (the Sphinx, the Obelisk, the Temple, and the Pyramid).
In each turn, the players place their pawns on the board, along the banks of the Nile, getting the advantages shown on each square. The players may take cards that are deployed randomly on the 10 squares at the start of each turn.
In Egizia, the twist on the worker placement mechanic is that the players must place their pawns following the course of the Nile, which also forces the player to place his remaining pawns only on the squares below the one he just occupied.
This is what a strategy-game should be about! Great game and some great artwork. The theme fits its mechanic very well and the game flows very nicely! Even now, it continues to be a favourite.

Board Game: A Brief History of the World
Board Game: A Brief History of the World

A Brief History of the World (2009) from Ragnar Brothers who reimplemented their earlier game History of the World from 1991 and changed quite a bit. A Brief History of the World is just that: a sweeping ride through the history of mankind in the space of just a few hours. The game features fifty of the mightiest Empires ever known, from the dawn of Civilisation through to the Twentieth Century.
This is easy to pick up and can be played in a few hours, this went great in my gaming group among experienced and non-experienced gamers alike.
In 2018 it was reimplemented again as History of the World and has revised rules to streamline the experience, and everything you need to etch your name in the annals of history.

Board Game: Assyria
Board Game: Assyria

Assyria (2009) by Emanuele Ornella where players represent tribes living in Mesopotamia, trying to develop on the desert and a limted fertile area located between two rivers that divide the board. In their quest for power (points), players build Ziggurats (permanent outposts), wells, make sacrifices to gods and try to get along with nobles of Assur - the capital of Assyria.
A deep game full of different ways of scoring. "Very Ystari", but in a good way. Interesting theme, well implemented and takes nearly 2 hours. Very good game.

Board Game: Arena: Roma II
Board Game: Arena: Roma II

Arena: Roma II (2009) by Stefan Feld The revolt in Rome will not end for a long time to come! Join the action and find out who is the most powerful ruler by skillfully playing your cards. No matter if you strengthen your own position with strong cards like Arena or Ballista or if you augment your victory points with Templarius and Triremis - you will be the winner if you use your characters and buildings with wit and savvy.
Quick, and brutal but surprisingly deep short filler game. Highly recommended couples game that plays in under 30 minutes.
Arena is a complete game of its own, but it may very well be combined with the cards from Roma (2005).

Board Game: Alea Iacta Est
Board Game: Alea Iacta Est

Alea Iacta Est (2009) where players take on the role of Caesar and compete for the most prestige points. This happens by clever placement of his/her eight dice, which are placed on five different buildings.
I like dice games and this one has lots of variety in the game in how to earn victory points. The interaction between the players is very interesting and a round can end very suddenly.
In 2016 it was reimplemented as Order of the Gilded Compass and uses a variable set-up in order to create fresh and interesting game play experiences. Each game has five locations in play to which players may assign their dice for various kinds of treasures and bonuses, and the game includes nine different buildings to allow for many unique combinations.

Board Game: Cleopatra's Caboose
Board Game: Cleopatra's Caboose

Cleopatra's Caboose (2010) A train game based...in Ancient Egypt?!?
Cleopatra's Caboose is a train game for 3 to 5 players that's based in Ancient Egypt. Each turn, players bid for the right to utilize a game designer of their choosing which denotes both the turn order and a special ability that can be used that turn.
Players construct tracks, ship fruits to cities that need them, construct buildings for victory points and to improve a city's status, and build pyramids to make a city more prestigious. Be careful, though; you have a limited amount of money and actions in which to accomplish your goals! Manage both wisely and become the Emperor of Ancient Egypt!
Railways in ancient Egyptis a bit of an odd theme, but this is actually quite a good game which involves auctions, resource management, set collection and area control, in fact an awful lot of things to think about. A very enjoyable game with some meaty decisions.


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Mon Jun 20, 2022 12:00 pm
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Category: Card Games #18

Brian Moore
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Bolton
Lancashire
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For this particular blog series, I'll look at small card games where cards are the sole component, or nearly so. I'll also limit this to games with around 50 cards in the deck, or perhaps around 100 cards, which is two decks.

These are the previous blogs in this series:
Category: Card Games, Category: Card Games #2, Category: Card Games #3, Category: Card Games #4, Category: Card Games #5, Category: Card Games #6, Category: Card Games #7, Category: Card Games #8, Category: Card Games #9, Category: Card Games #10, Category: card Games #11, Category: Card Games #12, Category: Card Games #13, Category: Card Games #14, Category: Card Games #15, Category: Card Games #16, Category: Card Games #17,

Here are some more card games that use just one or two decks.

Board Game: Canopy
Board Game: Canopy

Canopy (2021) by Tim Eisner is a game in which two players compete to grow the most bountiful rainforest. The jungle ecosystem is full of symbiosis and mutualism, and players must grow tall trees and lush jungle plants to attract the most diverse wildlife. By carefully selecting what grows in your forest, you can create the ideal balance of flora and fauna and develop a thriving rainforest.
In the game, players take turns selecting new cards for their forest from three growth piles. Each time you look at a pile, you may select it and add those cards to your rainforest tableau, or return the pile face down, adding one additional card to it. As the piles grow, you must search for the plants and animals that will benefit your forest the most — but choose carefully as the jungle also contains dangers in the form or fire, disease, and drought.
Fellow blogger Caroline Black really likes this and as we have similar taste in games, I bought a copy. The gameplay is super tight and polished, and is complex enough to keep things interesting without being confusing - if Anne enjoyed it, then that's a plus! Game length is perfect at around 30 minutes - not too long, not too short.

Board Game: Plato 3000
Board Game: Plato 3000

Plato 3000 (2012) is a revised and improved version of the print-and-play game Utopian Rummy, players have the opportunity to rebuild the world into a new utopia. Players take turns playing sets of Job cards, shaping the new world, and giving them powers to break the rules of the game. Other players can join in – adding their matching Job cards – to gain the power for their side and lay more cards of their own.
An easy to get into game, but with enough going on to keep serious gamers from getting bored with it.

Board Game: Steam Donkey
Board Game: Steam Donkey

Steam Donkey (2014) from Ragnar Brothers is a card game that is fun but has depth to its strategic play. You will make decisions about when to take cards into your hand from the resort and whether to build in the Park, Beach or Town area. An unusual mechanism in the game is that the reverse of each card is as important as its front. The reverse shows holiday-makers ("the Visitors") arriving at a railway station complete with suitcases and their mechanical dog. The suitcases are color-coded to show the area of the resort to which the Visitors are destined.
The idea of building a typically English Victorian seaside resort is great. The steampunk is more an added on theme, but it works for me to enhance the appeal of the artwork and the 'victorian seaside'.

Board Game: Obscura Tempora
Board Game: Obscura Tempora

Obscura Tempora (2005) is an easy card game settled in the Dark Ages. Each player is a faction that tries to expand his power and starts with a castle and a town. He can add towns and abbeys to his belongings, and also build ports, markets and walls on his towns. Each castle, town, abbey, market and port is worth a money card each turn, but only one per turn can go safely into the castle: the others must be kept in towns and abbeys.
The goal is to reach a certain amount of money, but every turn the choice is between keeping it or spending it to get more action and building cards.
A fast playing card game, based on a really simple set of rules. Probably not suited for players who want a high degree of tactics, but great for fast games.

Board Game: Cat Town
Board Game: Cat Town

Cat Town (2016) Welcome to Cat Town, a paradise for cats and cat lovers like you. On these lazy breezy days, you may see cats lying on the roof, inside the bushes, under the cars, or any other funny places they see fit. During your visit today, take a walk around the blocks to see how many cats you can find in Cat Town. The game combines memory, hand-management and deck-manipulation, with players scoring points in three ways: finding cats, collecting items, and playing Travel notes cards.
Luck plays a larger role than memory here, but it has lovely artwork, and the aspirational aim of collecting many cats is a pleasure.

Board Game: Micro City
Board Game: Micro City

Micro City (2020) is a small game about building your city, designed specifically for playing solo. Several game modes, different levels of difficulty and random distribution of districts will make each game different!
You will play one card in each round. You can use it as a material or perform the action described on it. You can also strengthen your action by activating one of the 2 dice you will have.
An interesting solo game about city building with different game modes.

Board Game: Riga
Board Game: Riga

Riga (2017) by Stefan Risthaus Each player takes two turns per round, the first in clockwise order, the second one counterclockwise. Your turn starts with choosing a group of commodity cards OR one building from the display in the middle of the table. Then you may build up to three buildings from your hand. To build, you must pay the costs by discarding your commodities. Depending on where you build (with the color of the building indicating the city), your commodities have a different value.
Riga continues the series of small games from Ostia in the Baltic Sea following Visby and Tallinn, (neither of which I have). A really nice light-weight filler game.

Board Game: Monster Trick
Board Game: Monster Trick

Stichling (2015) (aka Monster Trick) You won't play just one trick at a time in Stichling, but up to four! This introduces many exciting choices: Serve this here? Those cards there? Do I open a new trick? With so many options you need to plan ahead carefully and find the right time to secure the most points.
Can you predict the number of tricks you will win? There are other trick prediction games, but none where you must watch up to 4 tricks at the same time!
Very clever little trick taking game. As a three player game it has a super satisfying pace and feel to the game. My copy is the original Stichling edition.

Board Game: Coppertwaddle
Board Game: Coppertwaddle

Coppertwaddle (2000) by Tony Boydell where two players compete to populate their playing area (DOMAIN) with EIGHT personality cards (THRELMS), four of a NOBLE type and four of a PEASANT type. This they accomplish by playing Threlms from their hands or by robbing from their opponent.
A fun game that needs a few plays to see how the cards interact with each other, but worth the effort.

Board Game: Rollecate
Board Game: Rollecate

Rollecate (2019) by Michiel de Wit is about a historic steam locomotive, built in 1967 by a famous Dutch engineer. It's been sitting in storage for the past five years and is eager to get rolling again — and the players of this game will make that happen!
In this smart and innovative card-laying game, players build new tracks for Rollecate to ride on. But Rollecate is very eager and can't wait to roll, turning this game into an exciting race against the clock. Causing Rollecate to derail is costly, so players have to try to avoid that.
My copy is a deluxe version with a pewter train and the level of detailing of the little locomotive is impressive. It feels heavy and shines beautifully. The game itself moves quickly. The outcome is not completely predictable, which I also enjoy.


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Sun Jun 19, 2022 12:00 pm
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Category: Industry/Manufacturing #5

Brian Moore
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Bolton
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Category Industry Manufacturing

BGG Description:
Industry / Manufacturing games encourage players to build, manage and/or operate tools and machinery in order to manufacture raw materials into goods and products.
Many of the most popular Industry / Manufacturing games are Economic games as well.

Surprisingly BGG has just over 1000 games in this category.

These are previous blogs in this series:
Category: Industry/Manufacturing #1, Category: Industry/Manufacturing #2, Category: Industry/Manufacturing #3, Category: Industry/Manufacturing #4

Here are the last of these in the collection.

Board Game: Mint Works
Board Game: Mint Works

Mint Works (2017) by Justin Blaske is a light and straightforward worker placement game. Its compact size makes it easy to put in your pocket and take it anywhere. Its simple rules make it easy to introduce new players to the genre of worker placement.
During the game each player will have a limited amount of Mint Tokens, which represent their workers. Players will use these mint tokens to earn more tokens, take first player or buy and build plans. Plans are how players earn points. Some plans will give only points, others will give extra powers to the owner.
This is a solid, well-designed game and even more enjoyable having seen it grow out of the 2015 Mint Tin Challenge into a successful Kickstarter campaign. Mint Delivery (2017) and Mint Control (2020) are along similar lines.

Board Game: Coal Baron
Board Game: Coal Baron

Coal Baron (2013) by Michael Kiesling & Wolfgang Kramer has players sending miners underground to dig tunnels and acquire coal, which comes in four levels of quality and is used to fulfil contracts.
Each round players take turns placing their workers on action spaces; you can place on a space occupied by another player, but you need to place additional workers in order to do so. Each player has an individual elevator shaft, and will need to use workers to extract coal and bring it to the surface.
This is one of my favourite worker placement games. It is thematic and everyone enjoys moving their elevator up and down. There is nothing that requires a lot of reading, which can make other games drag on a bit, and the few icons involved are all very clear and understandable.

Board Game: Leonardo da Vinci
Board Game: Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci (2006) is set in fifteenth century Florence. The inventors of the Renaissance created amazing machines for the Lord of the city. Become the protagonist of this age of unbelievable discoveries by realizing your inventions! You'll direct your team into the laboratories, workshops, among the shops and perhaps learn the intrigues of the palace. Only the best can rival the great Leonardo!
An underrated worker placement game. I love how you're trying to make money, but you have to spend money to get upgrades and goods and so on.

Board Game: Transatlantic
Board Game: Transatlantic

Transatlantic (2018) by Mac Gerdts where 2 to 4 players lead their own shipping companies, which transport freight, mail, and passengers around the globe. They purchase new steamships from the market, each of them historical with their individual technical data (tons, knots etc.). Competition is tough, especially in the North Atlantic where winning the "Blue Riband" is not only a matter of prestige, but may also be a profitable investment. In order to let a shipping company flourish, purchasing the best steamships is not enough, if one fails to acquire enough coal bunkers and trade posts as well.
The game is driven by cards; on each turn, play one card and execute the related action.
this is a more streamlined version of Mac Gerdts' more famous title: Concordia. Yes, the hand management and cardplay are quite similar, but this game has an economic part to it as well. The bumping of ships and collecting points for scrap adds an interesting dynamic.

Board Game: Factory Fun
Board Game: Factory Fun

Factory Fun (2006) by Corné van Moorsel where players each start with a unique empty factory floor with a support pillar in the middle. During the game you purchase machines to place in your factory. Each machine takes 1 to 3 inputs from reservoirs (yellow, blue, red, and brown) and produces one output (of the same colours, or black end products). You must always connect all reservoirs and machines correctly by using the connectors (the pipelines). At the start this is easy, but becomes more puzzling during the game.
This is great fun to play, provided you like puzzle-like, simultaneous-solitaire games. Amazing how that one, seemingly unobtrusive central pillar can foil many a layout!
In 2016 it was reimplemented as Factory Funner and features the same gameplay as the original release, but with a deeper box, more connectors, and slightly different colours for better usability.

Board Game: Coffee Roaster
Board Game: Coffee Roaster

Coffee Roaster (2015) is a solitaire pool-building game. You choose a variety of coffee beans you want to roast, and put a number of tokens specific to that variety into a bag. Each turn, you draw a number of bean tokens randomly from the bag to advance their roast level. When you are finished, you make a cup-testing to check the taste of your coffee and score points accordingly. Each variety has its own target roast level, but approaching the target is not enough for perfect roasting; you also have to even out the roast level of each bean, while not spoiling the flavour of that variety.
There are 22 varieties of beans in the game. In one game, you try to roast three of them, and your roaster title is awarded based on the total score.
I love "bag-building" games, so I really like the "bag-building" aspect of this game. I think the theme ties in very well overall, and all of the multiple bean choices give a lot of life to this game.
My version is the red box 2017 edition, pictured.

Board Game: The Castles of Tuscany
Board Game: The Castles of Tuscany

The Castles of Tuscany (2020) by Stefan Feld is set in the beautiful Tuscany region, in the 15th century, and is the home of the Italian Renaissance. As influential princes, the players make creative decisions to build their region into a flourishing domain.
By supporting towns, villages, and monasteries, or by extracting marble and delivering goods, players see their lands grow, earning them victory points. Each round, players use cards to place useful tiles to expand their regions and gain new opportunities.
The winner is the person who has the most victory points after three rounds of play.
This is a more streamlined version of The Castles of Burgundy, and although they play differently, they do share some similarities. I just love how there are so many different ways to get victory points, it feels very satisfying and number-crunchy. I was going to use this as an introduction to CoB, but Anne said she actually prefers The Castles of Burgundy!

Board Game: Ground Floor
Board Game: Ground Floor

Ground Floor (2012) by David Short players barter with their fellow colleagues, manage their staff, collect information, expand their office, or schedule their next product shipment. It's up to you – after all, it's your business. Of course, no matter which route you decide to take to reach that corner office at the top of the tallest skyscraper, you must start with everyone else... on the Ground Floor!
This is a heavy economic Euro with an amazingly well integrated theme. There is no reasonable argument that it is not well integrated. Game rules and placement/scoring mechanisms all tie logically in an intuitive manner to the theme. One of the best business management simulation board games I've played.
In 2018 it was reimplemented as Ground Floor (Second Edition) and features gameplay similar to the original edition, but it's been streamlined and shortened. Automa rules also allow for solo game play,

Board Game: Constantinopolis
Board Game: Constantinopolis

Constantinopolis (2010) is a board game of resource management, economy, and trade for 2-5 players. With a moderate game time of 1 to 2 hours and intuitive rules, Constantinopolis strikes the perfect balance of accessibility and depth.
In the 6th century A.D., ruled by Emperor Iustinianus (commonly called 'Justinian'), Constantinopolis was the largest emporium in the East Roman 'Byzantine' Empire. Built on the shore of the Marmara sea, at the entrance of the Bosporus (Hellispontus), its position let it take on the role of one of the most important harbours. Its quickly expanding trade and exports to close cities were great opportunities for the local businessmen to expand their riches.
This is a really good economic snowball game. I have played this several times with a different number of players and have enjoyed it every single time.

Board Game: Wealth of Nations
Board Game: Wealth of Nations

Wealth of Nations (2008) where you take on the role of a national leader. Your goal is to take your nation from humble beginnings to the status of a world economic superpower. You achieve this by building Industries, which allows you to produce Commodities.
Each Commodity has one or more uses in the game. For example, Food is required to "feed" your Industries when they produce, while Capital is used to build certain types of Industries. As you build Industries, you create ever larger Industrial Blocs. The larger a Bloc is, the greater your return on investment when the Bloc produces Commodities.
A very challenging euro game. Perfectly reflects demand/supply dependencies in a market economy. The rules can be explained in 15 minutes which is really incredible for such sophisticated game.

Board Game: Food Chain Magnate
Board Game: Food Chain Magnate

Food Chain Magnate (2015) from Splotter Spellen is a heavy strategy game for gamers about building a fast food chain. The focus is on building your company using a card-driven (human) resource management system. Players compete on a variable city map through purchasing, marketing and sales, and on a job market for key staff members.
A great strategic game, with many paths to win. Very deep and hard to master. The fresh design works perfectly with 2 to 5 players. I've played it many times and it's still outstanding. Quite a table hog though!

Board Game: Crude: The Oil Game
Board Game: Crude: The Oil Game

Crude: The Oil Game (1974) players take on the role of oil company CEOs, seeking to expand their companies into multi-national energy mega-corporations. Just as with real world energy companies, player will setup facilities for oil drilling, oil pumping, oil refining into gasoline, and gasoline selling to the consumer... all of which are represented by actual plastic pieces placed on the board! Players also speculate by buying and selling oil and gasoline barrels in both the domestic and foreign markets... again represented by actual plastic barrels in their playing area!
However, the changing economic climate, as well as sudden world news events, will challenge players to keep a long-term strategic view of the world energy markets. The first player to reach a corporation value of $750 million is the winner!
This reimplementation of McMulti was released in 2012 by Stronghold Games. This is an excellent game where you buy Oil Drills, pump Oil, refine it and sell it as petrol. There is an interesting inter-relationship between the oil reserves and the petrol sales which can change with the dice roll, but there is enough die rolling that luck should even out - and even if it does not, this is still a great game.


That was the last blog in this series.
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Sat Jun 18, 2022 12:00 pm
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Mechanic: Contracts #1

Brian Moore
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Mechanic Contracts

BGG Description
Players fulfil Contracts to earn rewards. These take the form of special goals requiring coordination and planning beyond simply being "first past the post". These can be either public, where all players compete to be the first to complete them, or private, where only the owning player may fulfil them.

This often takes the form of a special type of Set Collection, such as in The Voyages of Marco Polo where Contracts defining an ad hoc set of resources that may be claimed to obtain the corresponding reward. Pick-up and Deliver is a special case of Contracts common to train games such as Empire Builder which should be selected for those games.

There are over 300 games listed on BGG using this mechanic.
These are the ones in the collection:

Board Game: Terraforming Mars
Board Game: Terraforming Mars

Terraforming Mars (2016) by Jacob Fryxelius In the 2400s, mankind begins to terraform the planet Mars. Giant corporations, sponsored by the World Government on Earth, initiate huge projects to raise the temperature, the oxygen level, and the ocean coverage until the environment is habitable. In Terraforming Mars, you play one of those corporations and work together in the terraforming process, but compete for getting victory points that are awarded not only for your contribution to the terraforming, but also for advancing human infrastructure throughout the solar system, and doing other commendable things.
During Research, players, draw new cards and buy new contracts (project cards), but the bulk of the game takes place in the Actions phase. The huge selection of cards provides lots of combinations and replayability.

Board Game: Ticket to Ride
Board Game: Ticket to Ride

Ticket to Ride (2004) by Alan R. Moon The game is really easy to play. Ticket to Ride can be learned in under 15 minutes. Players collect cards of various types of train cars they then use them to claim railway routes in North America. The longer the routes, the more points they earn. Additional points come to those who fulfil Destination Tickets – goal cards that connect distant cities; and to the player who builds the longest continuous route.
The map of US and Canada forms the game board, with cities interconnected by a colour-coded set of routes. Each player takes on a role of a rail-building tycoon aiming to successfully fulfil the most contracts in connecting specific cities.

Board Game: Gaia Project
Board Game: Gaia Project

Gaia Project (2017) is a reimplementation of Terra Mystica (2012). As in the original Terra Mystica, fourteen different factions live on seven different kinds of planets, and each faction is bound to their own home planets, so to develop and grow, they must terraform neighbouring planets into their home environments in competition with the other groups.
There's more variety than in TM with the variable map, the randomly positioned tech tiles, and the random advanced techs, which makes evaluating races in each game harder.

Board Game: Everdell
Board Game: Everdell

Everdell (2018) is a game of dynamic tableau building and worker placement.
Within the charming valley of Everdell, beneath the boughs of towering trees, among meandering streams and mossy hollows, a civilization of forest critters is thriving and expanding. From Everfrost to Bellsong, many a year have come and gone, but the time has come for new territories to be settled and new cities established.
On their turn a player can take one of three actions:
a) Place a Worker, b) Play a Card or c) Prepare for the next Season.
During setup, special Forest Locations are drawn at random and placed on the game board to provide powerful actions to workers outside of the Basic Locations that exist. Additionally, Special Events are randomly drawn and placed on the giant cardboard Ever Tree. Special Events are contracts that provide victory points upon fulfilment; they require specific Construction and Critter cards to be played in a city before a player can acquire them by placing a worker on the event.

Board Game: Lords of Waterdeep
Board Game: Lords of Waterdeep

Lords of Waterdeep (2012) is a strategy board game for 2-5 players, you take on the role of one of the masked Lords of Waterdeep, secret rulers of the city. Through your agents, you recruit adventurers to go on quests on your behalf, earning rewards and increasing your influence over the city. Expand the city by purchasing new buildings that open up new actions on the board, and hinder – or help – the other lords by playing Intrigue cards to enact your carefully laid plans.
Here, you try to complete quests by collecting the right meeples to complete that quest. The more of them you have at the end the more bonus points there are for your set of cards.
Lords of Waterdeep is a fantasy worker placement game where players strive to complete quests (contracts), which can score the players points and possibly offer them other bonuses as well.

Board Game: Splendor
Board Game: Splendor

Splendor (2014) is a game of chip-collecting and card development. Players are merchants of the Renaissance trying to buy gem mines, means of transportation, shops—all in order to acquire the most prestige points. If you're wealthy enough, you might even receive a visit from a noble at some point, which of course will further increase your prestige.
Splendor is a game with a simple premise: Get gems to fulfil contracts, which get you more gems and also victory points. It's a concept that is easy to handle, leading to quick turns and fast gameplay.
One of the main challenges of the game is figuring out when to stop building up your engine (buying cheap contracts that don't reward victory points) and start actually getting victory points (buying expensive contracts). As simple as that may sound, it's a concept that is tricky to master

Board Game: Stone Age
Board Game: Stone Age

Stone Age (2008) where the players live in this time, just as our ancestors did. They collect wood, break stone and wash their gold from the river. They trade freely, expand their village and so achieve new levels of civilization. With a balance of luck and planning, the players compete for food in this pre-historic time.
Players can gather five types of resources (Food, Wood, Clay, Stone and Gold) that can then be used to feed their people (at the end of every round) or complete huts or cards. Huts grant points and cards grant immediate benefits and long term scoring opportunities. So, huts are this games equivalent to contracts.

Board Game: Orléans
Board Game: Orléans

Orléans (2014) During the medieval goings-on around Orléans, you must assemble a following of farmers, merchants, knights, monks, etc. to gain supremacy through trade, construction and science in medieval France.
This a great bag-building game as well as a worker placement game.
At about halfway through the game the map and board of Beneficial Deeds becomes more relevant. The Beneficial Deeds board allows you to retire workers and thin your bag, acting like little contracts. It’s not something you want to do too early, but it can be worth quite a few points and should not be ignored.

Board Game: Roll for the Galaxy
Board Game: Roll for the Galaxy

Roll for the Galaxy (2014) by Thomas Lehmann is a dice game of building space empires for 2–5 players. Your dice represent your populace, whom you direct to develop new technologies, settle worlds, and ship goods. The player who best manages his workers and builds the most prosperous empire wins!
This dice version of Race for the Galaxy takes players on a new journey through the Galaxy, but with the feel of the original game.
I really like the secret simultaneous worker allocation, similar to Fresco. And I just love shaking a bunch of dice in a cup, although the plastic cups are noisy, so I lined them with felt.

Board Game: Imperial Settlers
Board Game: Imperial Settlers

Imperial Settlers (2014) by Ignacy Trzewiczek is a card game that lets players lead one of the four factions and build empires by placing buildings, then sending workers to those buildings to acquire new resources and abilities. The game is played over five rounds during which players take various actions in order to explore new lands, build buildings, trade resources, conquer enemies, and thus score victory points.
New faction and common cards are drawn at the beginning of each round. Once in play, each card is a building that either has an ongoing effect, grants the player an action they can use, or produces stuff (usually resources, points or cards).
The game oozes charm and levity rarely found in this genre. But best of all, you are rewarded for smart and strategic play, but the path to victory never feels too obvious.

The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Fri Jun 17, 2022 12:00 pm
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Mechanic: Push Your Luck #11

Brian Moore
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Tiny Epic Zombies: Deluxe EditionBGG Description: Players must decide between settling for existing gains, or risking them all for further rewards. Push-Your-Luck is also known as press-your-luck.

The previous blogs in this series are here:
Mechanic: Push Your Luck #1, Mechanic: Push Your Luck #2, Mechanic: Push Your Luck #3, Mechanic: Push Your Luck #4, Mechanic: Push Your Luck #5, Mechanic: Push Your Luck #6, Mechanic: Push Your Luck #7, Mechanic: Push Your Luck #8, Mechanic: Push Your Luck #9, Mechanic: Push Your Luck #10

BGG has over 3000 games listed in this category.
These are the ones in the collection:

Board Game: Dodekka
Board Game: Dodekka

Dodekka (2014) by Andy Hopwood where your goal is to collect the highest score possible from one of the five suits, while ideally scoring nothing in all of the other suits as those cards count against you! The deck includes cards numbered 0-4 in each colour, and three cards start face up on the table.
Game play is simple: Take the first card on display, or reveal a card from the deck and add it to the end of the row. If the sum of the cards on display now totals more than twelve, however, you must pick up all of the cards on display. Gameplay continues until the deck runs out, then the player with the highest score wins.
The game has a quick turn of pace thanks to being very straightforward in its rules. Decision making is limited as there are only two actions but the push your luck element does often add tension to that decision.

Board Game: Famous 500: The World's Smallest Car Racing Game
Board Game: Famous 500: The World's Smallest Car Racing Game

Famous 500: The World's Smallest Car Racing Game (2012) by Rob Bartel is a fun, fast-playing car racing simulation. The game focuses on managing the wear and tear on your vehicle, which you customize at the beginning of the game. For each hairpin, gentle curve, and straightaway on the track, players play a speed card, attempting to be the fastest car through that section. Higher speeds and more dangerous sections of track, however, will increase the wear and tear on your tires, fuel, and engine. Drop below zero in any of these and you’ll blow a tire, run out of fuel, or burst into a ball of flame.
The game is really fast and each lap lasts about ten minutes. The game is perfectly prepared for the duel of two players. With just nine cards you manage to create some exciting entertainment, in which you will easily lose track of time, and experience true racing tension.

Board Game: Space Invaders Dice!
Board Game: Space Invaders Dice!

Space Invaders Dice! (2017) are back in a brand new format! Space Invaders Dice! is a fun fast-paced tabletop game that plays just like the classic arcade game. Play solo or compete against up to three others for the record high-score. Grab your six-sided arsenal and save the planet before it's too late!
A roll and write game where you're dependent on rolling the right dice. If I press my luck and re-roll something bad, then it can hurt me but it comes with the sort of game it is. You can sort of press your luck or play the safe route, but at the end of the day you are rolling dice.

Board Game: DIG
Board Game: DIG

DIG (2017) by Chris Handy (I) where each player is a dog that will run throughout the Yard, dig up bones and attempt to return them to the matching colored Dog Bowl with the greatest efficiency. All players will score once, at the end of the game, based on the cumulative value of the Bones that they returned to the matching Dog Bowls.
One of the most interesting aspects of DIG is the unique "Leap Frog" Yard replacement mechanism. When a Bone is dug up, the Card that is furthest from the the Dog House is removed and fills the empty spot created by the Dog. This action creates some interesting ways to influence which Bones and Bowls each Dog has close access to.
A simple but enjoyable game which has a good balance of luck and strategy.

Board Game: RUM
Board Game: RUM

RUM (2017) by Chris Handy (I) is played in quick turns, over many rounds. The game ends when a player reaches a set amount of points OR the Castaway Clock is rotated to the Pirate Ship (8th position). During the game, sets of bottles are played in order to gain Captain Cards and earn points.
Players are pirates rummaging through a shipwreck. Collect sets of rum and press your luck to earn the majority. But watch out for the parrot, who will steal your booty! The pirate with most points is the winner!
RUM is a press your luck game. If you go for the lower point colours, you will capture them, only to have them stolen later by an opponent with a larger bottle strength later. Capturing bottles with 5 or less strength is usually not worth it, unless it is at the end of the game.

Board Game: Einfach Genial: Das Würfelspiel
Board Game: Einfach Genial: Das Würfelspiel

Einfach Genial: Das Würfelspiel (2012) by Reiner Knizia is part of a line of dice games packaged in cubes from KOSMOS.
On your turn, you roll your dice (which feature a differently colored and shaped symbol on each face) and score as many points for each symbol on the rolled dice as there are symbols on the dice in front of the other players. You can roll at most three times, so knowing when to keep your result or gamble for a better one is the difference between victory and defeat.
On your turn, roll all of your dice, then optionally roll them all again, and then score. Score by looking at the number of symbols on others’ dice that match yours, and score one of those symbols per die matched.
Your choices are limited to just whether to reroll, and how to use your wilds. I think the 2p game might actually be kind of more interesting.

Board Game: Römisch Pokern
Board Game: Römisch Pokern

Römisch Pokern (2015) from AMIGO has never had an English release, but there is no in-game text.
Each player gets six action cards. On your turn, you first roll a die. After each roll, you must decide whether to stop or to continue by rolling an additional die. You may continue to roll as long as your results can still form a Roman numeral. If you end your turn with a valid number, this number is noted in your column of the scoresheet.
If you rolled an invalid number, or the number is already in your column of the scoresheet, your turn ends.
A really fun roll & write that's the perfect playtime with just the right amount of push your luck. A very fun game that's easy to learn, and quick to play.

Board Game: Flaming Pyramids
Board Game: Flaming Pyramids

Flaming Pyramids (2018) where players are building one pyramid together using square tiles, but each player is trying to be the first to get rid of their own tiles.
This is a deceptively simple yet fun and exciting game to play. Start up can be slow when you begin but as you progress in raising the pyramid, you discover the trap potential by using lightweight materials and embers to set up fire traps. The game is a fun family filler that can be played as a friendly, casual game, an easy starter or filler, or as no-holds-barred multi-round competition.

Board Game: 6

6 (2015) by Andy Hopwood The tin contains a collection of dice and rules for six games that can be played with them.
A nice collection of dice games, with a great deal of variety in the tin making an inventive and fun way to use a few dice in lots of different ways.

Board Game: Rollway Station
Board Game: Rollway Station

Rollway Station (2020) is a roll and write game inspired by the 18xx series of games. In these games players take on the role of an investor, trading stocks and shares in train companies in order to beat the competition and earn the most money. Rollway Station distils the experience into a short solo experience, using dice to add a layer of unpredictability.
A really nice strategy game, with nice options to manipulate the dice. Can subtract points to manipulate dice for better dice options, track or bonus track option. Has multiple maps extending replayability.


This was the last blog in this series.
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Thu Jun 16, 2022 12:00 pm
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Category: Exploration #10

Brian Moore
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BGG Description:
Exploration games often encourage players to discover and search new areas or territories for particular objects or goods, and/or to search for people to become trading partners with.

These are the previous blogs in this series:
Category: Exploration #1, Category: Exploration #2, Category: Exploration #3, Category: Exploration #4, Category: Exploration #5, Category: Exploration #6, Category: Exploration #7, Category: Exploration #8, Category: Exploration #9

Not to be confused with Category: Space Exploration #1, which I did a blog series on last year.

Games that appeared in my recent Space Exploration blog series won’t be repeated here, not intentionally, anyway!

Board Game: Vanuatu (Second Edition)
Board Game: Vanuatu (Second Edition)

Vanuatu (Second Edition) (2016) from Quined Games is a reimplementation of a semi-failed KS from 2011. By that I mean that not all backers got a copy from the KS, like me.
you are a Vanuatuan who wants to prosper during the eight turns of the game. In order to prosper, you have to manage with natural resources, rare items, vatus (local currency) and tourists. To earn money or prosperity points, you may also draw on the sand*, carry tourists all over Vanuatu islands, or trade cargo with foreign countries.
On each turn, the archipelago expands and you have to program your actions with five tokens. You put one or more of them on the chosen action spaces, and on your turn, you will only be able to play an action if you have the majority on its space.
This game is designed to people who like a deep strategic fight on the board, competing to get the right to do your planned actions, without randomness!

Board Game: Santa Cruz
Board Game: Santa Cruz

Santa Cruz (2012) is played in two independent rounds in which players build homes, churches and lighthouses on the island while also developing valuable resources.
Players each start with a hand of cards, comprising traveling cards and scoring cards. They then explore a board showing three islands, which have tiles laid face-down representing buildings and places, such as churches and lighthouses. On a turn, players must play either a traveling card to explore and place buildings in their color or play a scoring card to score a particular type of building, resource, or other game condition for all players. Spaces near the central volcano are more valuable, but are vulnerable to a negative eruption scoring card.
This has a modicum of strategy, heavy on tactics, much more to consider that seems at first. Plays quickly and looks lovely.
Never had an English version, but no in-game text.

Board Game: Dragon Quest
Board Game: Dragon Quest

Dragon Quest (1992) is a fantasy miniatures game and a typical Dragons & Dungeon game that requires a Game Master. The original game came with 6 Ral Partha metal miniatures, 180 cards (featuring monsters, treasures, objects and traps), a dungeon board, D&D dice, and three pre-made adventures.
An early introductory set to D&D disguised as a boardgame. Loved the minis.

Board Game: Maori
Board Game: Maori

Maori (2009) where the players explore the islands of Polynesia. The winner is the player who scores the most points from putting tiles on his display. Palms, huts, shells, and boats on the tiles influence the scoring. The game can be played with 2 to 5 players.
A very good meaty filler that is a lovely tile laying game where you can actually plan ahead, unlike Carcassonne. Somewhat light player interaction, though it's crucial to keep in mind what your opponent is likely to do.

Board Game: The Sorcerer's Cave
Board Game: The Sorcerer's Cave

The Sorcerer's Cave (1978) by Terence Peter Donnelly where players are using cards to create an underground lair that players explore -– cooperatively or competitively -- using bands of characters, in an attempt to leave with the highest score (monsters defeated and treasure). Gaming decisions are relatively limited, but the fascination of the game lies in the changing setup and the 'story' that is created on each occasion.
An elegant game, that's simple and fun to play, but it will not only hog your table, but the floor as well!

Board Game: The Mystic Wood
Board Game: The Mystic Wood

The Mystic Wood (1980) by Terence Peter Donnelly where players are knights seeking to perform a particular quest (varies with each knight) in order to win the game. Exploration and adventure are created by the game board being made up of randomly placed tiles which are uncovered as the knights reach them. Tiles can be fixed locations or glades where a randomly chosen role card can reveal a spell or a denizen.
There is quite a bit of luck involved, but that's not objectionable for a game that is fast and fun. It always feels tense when someone is making a dash for the Mystic Gate after completing their quest with everyone else close behind!
My copy is the Ariel Productions Ltd version. Ah did a version too.

Board Game: Hengist
Board Game: Hengist

Hengist (2015) by Uwe Rosenberg which is a 2-player game in which both players compete for the same treasure tiles. The player who uses their cards wisely and has a little bit of luck will get the more valuable treasure tiles and win the game.
A light game not to be taken too seriously. The fact that the "land" tiles and the "path way" tiles are pretty much decided at random for each game makes replaying the game a lot of fun too.

Board Game: Giganten
Board Game: Black Gold
Board Game: Giganten

Giganten (1999) Besides attempting to find oil in dusty Texas, players must also try to outbid one another for sales contracts in the oil industry. An oilfield with drilling sites scattered about is spread out before the players, who take their trucks out trying to grab those sites as quickly as possible.
Three groups of tiles are laid over the drilling sites, giving a range of value for each site once it has been reached by a player. The deeper a site is into the field the greater its overall yield. But players have to weigh this against creating a constant supply from the smaller yields that are closer at the beginning of the game.
Very nice economic game, and I like we have to use a good strategy when we move our trucks.
In 2011 it was reimplemented as Black Gold with support for a 5th player and a modular board.

Board Game: Plunder
Board Game: Plunder

Plunder (2004) lets you captain your own pirate ship and explore the seas to Plunder other vessels and seek hidden treasure while avoiding storms, ghost ships and the dreaded kraken. An adventurous, fast-paced pirating escapade for the whole family!
This game, which came in a chest-shaped box, where there is no strategy, just sail and plunder ships and ports, faster than the other pirates.

Board Game: The Warlock of Firetop Mountain
Board Game: The Warlock of Firetop Mountain

The Warlock of Firetop Mountain (1986) by Steve Jackson (II) is based on the "Fighting Fantasy" game book of the same name. This series of books is similar to the "pick your path" type of adventure books that TSR and many others published around this time (mid 1980's).
Characters roam the labyrinth fighting creatures and gaining treasures to increase their power. Characters have three stats: Skill, Stamina, and Luck and these affect both combat and various perils that are held in the dungeon such as traps. The object of the game is to travel to the end of the dungeon and open the Warlock's treasure chest. Along the way players must deduce the correct combination of three keys which will open the chest, and find or steal the appropriate keys.
A light, fun little dungeon crawl, with a little bit of "Clue" style deduction thrown in. Kind of dated, but I still enjoy it.


The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Wed Jun 15, 2022 12:00 pm
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