BATs Cave of Games

My games collection and the stories behind the games

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Mechanic: Network & Route Building #10

Brian Moore
United Kingdom
Bolton
Lancashire
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Microbadge: Gamer with Non-gamer SpouseMicrobadge: Herculean Board Game CollectorMicrobadge: Gaming since 1969Microbadge: 15 Year Geek VeteranMicrobadge: I play with yellow!
BGG Description: Network Building is a specialized kind of set collection in which the sets collected represent ties between nodes, often represented as routes between destinations, and contributing some in-game benefit.

The 1st blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Network & Route Building #1
The 2nd blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Network & Route Building #2
The 3rd blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Network & Route Building #3
The 4th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Network & Route Building #4
The 5th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Network & Route Building #5
The 6th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Network & Route Building #6
The 7th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Network & Route Building #7
The 8th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Network & Route Building #8
The 9th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Network & Route Building #9

BGG has over 1800 games/expansions that are defined as having this mechanic. Out of those, I have around 300 in the collection.


Board Game: Magna Grecia
Board Game: Magna Grecia

Magna Grecia (2003) The game is a joint work of Leo Colovini and Michael Schacht.
The southern region of Italy was called Magna Grecia and was settled 2,500 years ago by Greek merchants and adventurers. Before the arrival of the Greeks, the country was inhabited by only a few small tribes. Fruitful soil, navigable rivers, large forests, and bronze and silver mines offered enormous development possibilities. Larger cities developed, such as Tarantum, Syracuse, Katane, Locri, and Naxos. In addition, there were numerous villages of which no trace remains.
Each player must successfully settle and develop Magna Grecia. At favorable points, markets are built, villages are developed into cities and interconnected by a road system. Only thus may the interior be opened and the Oracle controlled.
This game has tough decisions and completely open information which makes it a game to keep coming back to.

Board Game: 18Lilliput
Board Game: 18Lilliput

18Lilliput (2018) players try to build up the best railroad network by using action cards to get richer than the other players.
Every player starts with a railroad corporation and a character that gives them a special ability during the game. The game is limited to eight rounds of play, and every round, each player may select two action cards from a common pool to undertake activities on behalf of their railroads. These actions include laying new track, upgrading track, buying trains, buying new shares or opening a new company, or simply getting money into one's personal cash or into a company's treasury.
I don't get to chance to play 18xx games very often, so I guess that makes me a novice 18xx player. However, this game is so deep with endless replayability. A good euro game with some 18xx touches.

Board Game: Aquädukt
Board Game: Aquädukt

Aquädukt (2005) Building houses isn't hard - but providing water is much more so. By following this ancient Roman building principle, a prosperous landscape is settled by the players. But the beautiful houses are useless without water. If a player doesn't provide water for his houses before the neighborhood is completely built up, then the inhabitants - good or bad - must move out and the house brings no victory points.
After reading the rules I thought this was going to be dull and dry, but it's a lot of fun with agonizing choices during a fast-paced 30-40 minute game.

Board Game: Mini Rails
Board Game: Mini Rails

Mini Rails (2017) includes only two types of actions — "Buy Shares" and "Build Tracks" — and you must carefully decide how to best use them. You must do each action exactly once per round, and which company you choose affects the turn order on the next round.
The stock prices of the six railroads will be affected by the terrain upon which the routes are expanded. Everything matters in this beautiful, compact filler game, which is short and simple to play.
Everything is smoothly connected and it all counts. The simplicity of rules combined with the richness of meaningful decisions makes this a good example of a well designed game.

Board Game: Mini Express
Board Game: Mini Express

Mini Express (2021) by designer Mark Gerrits, who also designed Mini Rails, above. Mini Express is a strategic train game for 1 to 5 players in which you and other wealthy capitalists manage four railroad companies. Through careful planning and ruthless execution, players pioneer the western expansion of the 19th century, vying to be the most influential railroad baron and complete the transcontinental railroad.
Fast, really easy to teach and learn yet has some tight decisions to be made. Feels completely different to Mini Rails.

Board Game: Catan Histories: Merchants of Europe
Board Game: Catan Histories: Merchants of Europe

Catan Histories: Merchants of Europe (2011) you are a powerful merchant! Start your trading posts in three cities. Recruit new merchants and send them to distant cities to establish trading posts and expand your interests. The more trading posts you have, the more commodities are at your disposal which you can sell profitably in foreign cities. To ensure that your commodities arrive safely at their destination, you must open up trade routes and equip caravans.
Good development of Catan with a beginner and advanced board, which is a nice idea. Harder than the original game, so only enjoyable without casual players.

Board Game: Avenue
Board Game: Kokoro: Avenue of the Kodama
Board Game: Kokoro: Avenue of the Kodama

Avenue (2016) Players draw a network of roads on their player sheet, trying to connect their farms and castles to grapes. Each round, a card is drawn that shows which type of road the players must draw. Some cards are marked as scoring cards, and when the fourth scoring card is drawn, a new farm is scored. The order in which the farms are scored is revealed one-by-one throughout the game, so players must constantly adapt their strategies.
A good example of the "draw route" type. Can be played at any count, anywhere. Simple rules but still offers a lot of choice.
In 2017, it was reimplemented as Kokoro: Avenue of the Kodama where each player has a forest map to draw their paths and turns are simultaneous so the game plays quickly.

Board Game: La Strada
Board Game: La Strada

La Strada (2004) by Martin Wallace is a particularly clever road-building game. Everything – from the rules to the game play – is simple - build roads, connect cities.
The game features a variable game board, built up out of hex tiles that depict easily travelled flatland, forests, or hills. The object of the game is to connect together as many settlements with your roads as possible, in order to get as many victory points as possible. The catch is that settlements award fewer and fewer victory points the more players connect to them.
Nice short game, but you can get cut off and be out of the game early but it's painless. Good depth for such a quick little game.

Board Game: Jet Set
Board Game: Jet Set

Jet Set (2008) players spend money to place airplanes on key airlinks between cities. The first to place an airplane on a link gains cheaper rights, but other players can still use the link for a price. A number of flight cards are on display; a player can claim one after connecting the two cities shown. Longer flights are worth more points, but the short flights are easier and less expensive to achieve, and they bring in just as much income as the long flights.
This game is about setting up flights between European cities to gain income. A really fun network-building game which can be enjoyed as a heavy game or lighter fare.
In 2009 a mini expansion Jet Set: Investor & Business Expansion brought new cards to the game for added variety.
In 2011 the first expansion Jet Set: Distant Lands – Expansion Set 1 added four new ways to play the game as well as more cards.
In 2016 the second expansion Jet Set: Jumbo Jets – Expansion Set 2 added five modules to the game, including the Jumbo Jets.

Board Game: Clippers
Board Game: Clippers

Clippers (2002)

Board Game: Carpe Astra
Board Game: Carpe Astra

Carpe Astra (2008) 10,000 years in the future, humanity has claimed the stars. But all is not well. The Emperor is weak, and without strong guidance, the Empire is crumbling. Powerful guilds within the empire are squabbling, positioning themselves for their own gain. If the Empire is to survive, it needs a strong leader - that means you! You must build a power base throughout the Empire by connecting with important guilds: the military, traders, priests, engineers, expansionists, and politicians and then claim the throne. Time is running out, though; others also struggle for the throne. You must form a network of support with powerful guilds and slander your opponents.
This is from a small publisher called Reiver Games founded by Jackson Pope to publish his games, four in total.
A game that is quick enough to play when you're not up for a long commitment, but not quite a light filler: the tactics and strategy are not too simple or too complex.

Board Game: Guatemala Café
Board Game: Guatemala Café

Guatemala Café (2006) is a game about coffee planting and selling in Guatemala. The game uses two boards, representing plantations and markets. Players try to produce different kinds of coffee to ship to Europe. The market overseer decides where and if players can buy roads, huts, workers or ships or if scoring takes place. The scoring track also has a marker on it which moves ahead. The game ends when a player caught up with the marker on the scoring track.
You have to balance building your plantations with restricting your opponents' and getting the pieces you need with denying your opponents the same. Nice production with loads of wooden bits. Good game.
The game came with real coffee-beans in a bag. They're not needed in the game, but they brought a fantastic odour of coffee in the box when you opened it!


The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Mon Dec 6, 2021 11:00 am
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Mechanic: Auction/Bidding #5

Brian Moore
United Kingdom
Bolton
Lancashire
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BGG Description: This mechanic requires you to place a bid, usually monetary, on items in an auction of goods in order to enhance your position in the game. These goods allow players future actions or improve a position. The auction consists of taking turns placing bids on a given item until one winner is established, allowing the winner to take control of the item being bid on.

BGG has over 4500 under the mechanic auction/bidding games.

The 1st blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Auction/Bidding #1
The 2nd blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Auction/Bidding #2
The 3rd blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Auction/Bidding #3
The 4th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Auction/Bidding #4

Naturally, over the years, several of these have found their way into the collection. As usual these are in no particular order.

Board Game: Dream Factory
Board Game: Dream Factory

Hollywood Blockbuster (2006) began life as "Traumfabrik", then after this version it became "Dream Factory". Another Reiner Knizia auction game this time about producing movies. Players bid on chips representing genuine directors, actors, camera, effects, music, guest stars and agents. These all get placed on players' film-strips, to complete the movie production.
The auction is a basic rising offer with passing until one winning bid remains. Players pay into the pot with contracts as money, and the rest of the players share the pot each turn.
A great Knizia auction game where the theme really works. It's light but still with enough depth to keep a gamer intently interested.

Board Game: Bruxelles 1893
Board Game: Bruxelles 1893

Bruxelles 1893 (2013) is a worker placement game with elements of bidding and majority control. Each player is an architect of the late 19th century and is trying to achieve, through various actions, an architectural work in the Art Nouveau style. The most successful building yields the most points. Each player can also create works of art to increase his score.
The action board is modular, with not every player having access to each action each turn. Some actions cost money – acquiring high-quality materials, building a level of your personal house, finding a patron, creating a work of art, selling that art for money and prestige – while other actions are free but can potentially cause you to lose one of your workers; these latter actions include acquiring low-quality materials, activating your patrons, visiting the stock exchange, and taking one of the actions with a cost.
This is a unique combination of many different mechanics which together create a wonderful gaming experience.
In 2019 it was reimplemented as Bruxelles 1897
In 2022 it is due to be reimplemented again as Bruxelles 1893: Belle Epoque

Board Game: Princes of the Renaissance
Board Game: Princes of the Renaissance

Princes of the Renaissance (2003) by Martin Wallace where each player takes on the role of one of the minor Condottiere princes. Then there are the big five major cities: Venice, Milan, Florence, Rome, and Naples. These are not controlled by individual players, but players will gain 'interests' in them as the game progresses. Each city has six tiles, most of which represent a famous character such as Lucrezia Borgia or Lorenzo Medici. Each tile has its own special properties that are linked to the character on the tile. No game on the Italian Renaissance would be complete without an element of treachery. Players can be openly treacherous by buying Treachery tiles, which will allow them to do nasty things like steal influence, bribe troops, or knock players out of an auction.
A stylish and well made product. The rules are simple but allow a great versatility in order to win.
The game was rereleased in 2016 by Mercury Games. My copy is the original version.

Board Game: Manila
Board Game: Manila

Manila (2005) Barges, freight and profits are what it's all about in Manila, a speculative contest for 3-5 players. Goods shipments, intended for transport along sea routes, are in danger of gathering dust in the warehouses or being lost at sea in a storm. While the players speculate about success and failure, the ultimate fate of the ships will be determined by the dice.
There are four shipments that need to get to Manila - jade, ginseng, silk and nutmeg. A round begins with an initial auction to become harbour master. If you win, you'll be allowed to buy a share of one of the shipments, choose which three shipments you'd like to take down river and how likely they are to make it to their destination in the harbour. If they make it to Manila, their share price will increase. The aim of the game is to bet on the outcome of these shipments, with dice ultimately determining their fate.
I'd been hearing good things about this game on BGG, so in 2007 I decided to get a copy from my FLGS. This is one of the best games with a betting mechanic out there in my opinion. The game consists of several rounds with 'risk vs reward' style decisions. The components are good and make for a super fun theme. Plus, the game is easy to teach and learn.

Board Game: Liberté
Board Game: Liberté

Liberté (1998) by Martin Wallace covers the French Revolution from 1789 to 1799. In each turn there is a variable number of rounds, followed by an election to see which faction becomes the government. There are three factions, the Radicals (red), the Moderates (blue), and the Royalists (white). The most common action is for a player to place faction blocks on the board. He shows he controls these blocks by placing one of his tokens on top of the stack. Players are attempting to score victory points by having the most influence in the government and opposition.
Trust Martin Wallace to turn area majority inside out. Players are NOT the 3 factions of the French Revolution, but they can control all of them in various regions. Players seek to have the most control of the faction that ends up winning each election.

Board Game: Tribune: Primus Inter Pares
Board Game: Tribune: Primus Inter Pares

Tribune: Primus Inter Pares (2007) In ancient Rome, tribunes were highly esteemed individuals elected by the people to represent them politically and militarily. Players take on the role of a powerful and ambitious patrician family. By applying influences and manipulating controls over the various factions, they attempt to pave their way to victory in order to attain the high office of the tribune.
Tribune is a combination of worker placement and set collection from the designer of Die Macher, Karl-Heinz Schmiel.
This was by far one of my favourite games. Each and every turn presents small victories around the board, so players are rewarded with a sense of accomplishment no matter how poorly they play.
In 2021 the game was reimplemented as Tribune which also includes the expansion from the original game.

Board Game: Peloponnes
Board Game: Peloponnes

Peloponnes (2009) where players take control of the civilizations of ancient Greece. Through auctions in each of the 8 rounds, the players develop their civilizations, adding territory through Land Tiles and prestigious buildings through the Building Tiles. These increase the civilizations' inhabitants, luxury, wealth and power. Luxury goods allow flexibility in providing for a player's population, while some tiles also offer protection against the many disasters that happen during the game.
Each turn is tense and exciting. It gives me the satisfaction of laying tiles where each tile can make or break my kingdom. I've loved this game since I first bought it in 2009 and have all the expansions for it - all 11 of them.
In 2015 Peloponnes Box was released containing all expansions up to that point, so includes all expansions except the 2017 release Peloponnes: Heroes and Colonies

Board Game: Evo
Board Game: Evo

Evo (2001) where you control the survival and evolution of a species of dinosaurs called Dinos. You guide their migrations to temperate climates, you acquire the perfect genes to develop your Dinos and mutate them, and you push out other creatures that have yet to learn the meaning of the term "dominant species". At the end of the game, you and your Dinos will not be the winners unless you've evolved more quickly and successfully than everyone else.
The first two turns have no real consequences so you can teach the rules as you go. But by mid-game when dinosaurs are competing for good feeding and breeding ground, the tactics and tricks are as rich as anything.

Board Game: Rialto
Board Game: Rialto

Rialto (2013) by Stefan Feld In the card-driven board game Rialto, the game board displays the six districts of Venice, and players earn VPs for placing council members into these, for building bridges, placing gondolas to connect the districts with one another, and for building advantageous buildings.
I like the simple card play in this game, although I feel like it can be difficult for some to grasp strategies on the first play. Holding back cards to play them next round is probably more powerful than it first seems. Similar to Feld's Strasbourg in some ways in that it has about the same level of complexity and playtime, - you can't afford to mess up part of your strategy or your whole plan will fall apart.

Board Game: The Speicherstadt
Board Game: The Speicherstadt

The Speicherstadt (2010) by Stefan Feld is an auction card game. Players compete for victory points, which come mainly from contracts. Players bid for cards by creating rows with their meeples over them. Each meeple in a row increases the cost of a card - but only for players "below" it. This is the main mechanic of the game - players must consider when to bid (place their meeple) over a certain card and when to use their meeples to make others pay more. This is important, because a player can make only three bids during a round. Cards feature contracts and resources used to fulfil those contracts and other special cards.
This is such a great game! You can learn it in under 10 minutes, it plays quick, and is so much fun! It has an excellent bidding mechanism with a built in screw your neighbour element.
In 2012 an expansion was released Kaispeicher which added new wares and cards to the game, including not only new buildings, orders and ships, but also several actions that will allow you to gain an advantage or make life difficult for your opponents. It also included 25 real metal coins.

Board Game: Jórvík
Board Game: Jórvík

Jórvík (2016) by Stefan Feld where players assume the roles of Viking jarls. They gather prestige points by trading goods, holding big feasts, funding pillages, commissioning craftsmen and hiring soldiers to defend the city against recurring invasions. The player with the most prestige points wins.
The game is a re-design of The Speicherstadt (2010). In this game, players acquire cards from a card display through a simple yet brilliant worker placement and bidding mechanism to build up their trading empires. Jórvík includes two versions: A base game that is equivalent to The Speicherstadt, and an advanced game that equates to The Speicherstadt including its expansion Kaispeicher.
The reverse auction style is just beautiful. It takes all the bluffing and mindgames out of auctions while still leaving all the interaction and prediction in.

Board Game: Tinners' Trail
Board Game: Tinners' Trail

Tinners' Trail (2008) by Martin Wallace is set in nineteenth century Cornwall. You are mining for copper and tin, attempting to sell when the prices are high. To reduce the cost of mining you can place developments, such as ports, adits, and trains. Once you have made your money you invest it in industries outside of Cornwall, which gains you victory points. The earlier you invest the better the return.
Great auction/ action point interaction and a nice market mechanic make this a favourite. Who would have thought tin and copper were so much fun....
In 2021 the game was reimplemented as Tinners' Trail which differs from the original 2008 version in several ways. The player count, for example, is now 1-5 instead of 3-4, and the resources on the board are now set up via tiles instead of die rolls to maintain variability while reducing the randomness. Dual-use cards are now an important part of the game, giving you information before an auction or an extra boost after an auction.


The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #11

Brian Moore
United Kingdom
Bolton
Lancashire
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Microbadge: Gamer with Non-gamer SpouseMicrobadge: Herculean Board Game CollectorMicrobadge: Gaming since 1969Microbadge: 15 Year Geek VeteranMicrobadge: I play with yellow!
I've been looking back at my earliest games and found I have over 80 from before I seriously started collecting games in 1976 - the year I got married.

The first in this blog series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #1
The 2nd in this blog series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #2
The 3rd blog in this series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #3
The 4th in this blog series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #4
The 5th blog in this series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #5
The 6th blog in this series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #6
The 7th blog in this series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #7
The 8th blog in this series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #8
The 9th blog in this series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #9
The 10th blog in this series is here: Collecting . . . Before I Began Collecting #10

Here in this blog I will cover the year 1975 because there are 18 games in the collection for that year - enough for two blogs.

For 1975 I have 18 games listed
For 1976 I have 10 games listed at which point I got married.

1975 Part One

Board Game: 221B Baker Street: The Master Detective Game
Board Game: 221B Baker Street: The Master Detective Game

221B Baker Street: The Master Detective Game is the London address of the world's most celebrated fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes, and his dedicated companion, Dr. Watson. In this game you start at 221B and travel through the streets and alleys of London picking up clues and attempting to solve the most intriguing cases Holmes and Watson have ever faced.
Each case is represented by a card that features a crime told in story form, a selection of probable suspects and a list of locations involved in that crime. Clues are hidden throughout London, one in each of fourteen locations. Players must collect clues from each location, noting them down on their checklists as they attempt to find the answers to the questions listed on the case card.
Good game of deduction. Unlike Clue, you collect actual text clues and must deduce the mystery. The more clues, the less you have to fill in yourself.
My version is the Gibsons 'long box' and over the years I added several more cases. Gibsons were still producing the game, the latest in 2016.

Board Game: Blockade
Board Game: Blockade
Board Game: Blockade

Blockade Players each have 2 pawns, 9 green walls (which are placed vertically), and 9 blue walls (placed horizontally). Pawns start on the colour matching them, which are 4x4 squares in on each of the four corners of the 11x14 board. The object is simple: to get one of your pawns to a starting spot of your opponent. Each turn players can move one pawn up to two spaces, and also place one wall, useful for blocking off their opponent's move.
My copy of this is 'Cul-de-Sac', but in 1979 it was renamed 'Blockade'. It's a nice 2 player game as you try to get your pawn across the board while using walls to stop your opponent doing the same.

Board Game: Deception
Board Game: Deception

Deception Poker game in which players look at and claim concealed playing cards to form poker hands. After a round of betting, players reveal their hands. A memory component is introduced at this stage, as the players view more cards than necessary to form their hands.
Don't remember much about this. Think it was a carboot sale find.

Board Game: Doctor Who
Board Game: Doctor Who

Doctor Who From the box: "It's a thrill-a-move race through time and space! Can you be the first back to earth?"
The object is to move around the board covering all 4 Monster Planets and become the first player to get back to Earth Base at the center of the board"
Your playing piece is a "punch out & stand up" Tom Baker version of The Doctor. Movement is by card play. When you land on a black dot, you roll a D6 and take the action indicated. You might be moved forward, or back or stuck in place. Landing on a blue space allows you to take control of the TARDIS. This allows double movement next turn. Special cards (or a TARDIS) are required to move from planet to planet.
This is a simple roll and move game, typical of the 70's, where you are trying to race to the end of the board.

Board Game: Dungeon!
Board Game: Dungeon!

Dungeon! is similar to Dungeons & Dragons, although much simplified and transformed into a board game. Players explore a dungeon that is divided into levels of increasing difficulty, fighting monsters for valuable treasure. As players venture deeper into the dungeon, the monsters become more difficult and the treasure more valuable. Several character classes each have slightly different fighting abilities – most notably the wizard, who can cast spells. Combat is simulated using dice; players roll the dice to attack a monster, and if unsuccessful, the dice are rolled to determine the effect of the monster's counter-attack.
This joined the collection back in the 80s when TSR was still around. Fun game with a bit of strategy and press-your luck in there.
In 1989 it was reimplemented as The New Dungeon!
In 1992 it was again reimplemented as The Classic Dungeon
In 2014 Wizards of the Coast re-released the game.

Board Game: En Garde!
En Garde! is a semi-historical game/simulation representing many of the situations of an Errol Flynn movie set in the Seventeenth or Eighteenth Centuries. The game was originally devised as a fencing system, with background added to provide scenarios for the duels. After a time, it became apparent that the background was more fun than the duels, and En Garde, in its present form, was born."
In En Garde, a player finds himself born into and educated in a world where social climbing is a way of life, and status is a goal to be pursued even over money. It is a world inhabited by Cyrano, Roxanne, Scaranouche, Errol Flynn, Porthos, Athos, Aramis, Rhonda Fleming, Francois Villon, Constance, and, of course, D'Artagnan. There are people to be used, friends in high places to be cultivated, enemies to be humiliated, the Cardinal's Guard to be trounced, lackies to be abused, the hand of a fair damsel to be won, and the ear of the King to be gained. Come with us now, to those vibrant, bawdy days of Yore.
A pencil and paper game in the style of an RPG, and with much of the detail expected in an RPG of the time, but with the "adventure" structure built into charts and tables so that no referee was required. Playable by any number of players.
This was very popular in the postal hobby of the 70's and 80's and several campaigns were played out. I do believe a few of these are still being run today. Did have a lot of fun playing this postally.

Board Game: Epaminondas
Board Game: Epaminondas

Epaminondas is one of Robert Abbott's masterpieces, sadly poorly known. It's a pure abstract 2 player game, white versus black. Epaminondas is named after the Theban general who invented the phalanx formation he used to defeat the Spartans in 371 B.C. The term "phalanx" is used in the game to describe a connected group of two or more pieces in a straight line, either orthogonally or diagonally.
Epaminondas is played on a 14 x 12 checkered board with 28 black pieces and 28 white pieces. The objective is to move your pieces across the board onto your opponent's back rank, the row closest to him, by moving your phalanxes and capturing enemy pieces.
This is a sort of sandbox game because you play like you want as long as you stick close to the rules. Your plan comes together. The opponent's plan comes together, and then you let them loose.

Board Game: Gambler
Board Game: Gambler

Gambler Players move around the board conducting various games of chance (horse racing, lottery, lucky number, etc.) in order to win money. The first person to reach a certain money level wins the game. The centerpiece of the game is a unique dice shaker that randomizes the dice and has them fall into the handle so that players can bet on the order that the dice fall in.
Another game typical of the 70's. This mindless game is thoroughly luck-driven, but it was a lot of fun to play.

Board Game: Microdot
Board Game: Microdot

Microdot Espionage game where players must steal the diplomatic bag of any one opponent and return it to their own headquarters to win; a 'capture the bag' game you might say.
Players start on the outer track of the board where they move around gathering pieces of equipment (ladder, revolver, dagger, earphones, passport, wire-cutters) needed for the bag-capture 'mission'. As each piece is obtained, it is placed near the player's HQ on the inner part of the board. Once five pieces of equipment have been so placed, the mission can begin, which takes place on the inner part of the board.
This is one of the games I bought years ago because I was at that time trying to 'refind' games from , or to to remind me of my childhood.

Board Game: Pay Day
Board Game: Pay Day

Pay Day Pay Day is played on a one-month calendar with 31 days. During the game, players will have to deal with various bills and expenses, but will also have the opportunity to make deals on property and earn money. At the end of each month, players are paid their salary (the same for each player) and must then pay off all outstanding bills, taking out a loan if necessary. Most money (or least debt) wins after a certain number of months decided by the players (3 months usually takes 30 minutes to finish).
It’s a good game on its own, but the memories I have playing it keep it in the collection. Latest English version was by Hasbro in 2016

Board Game: Shoulder to Shoulder
Board Game: Shoulder to Shoulder

Shoulder to Shoulder From the box "Simple, but highly tactical game for 2 or 3 players, the winner being the first player to bring together all his or her twelve pieces into a single cluster, shoulder to shoulder".
In your turn you can either move one pawn in a straight line without passing over or landing on another occupied hex, or, if you move one of your pawns and that pawn is currently on your colour you can jump to one of the nearest hexes of your colour - ie one of the 6 hexes of your colour 2 hexes away.
Now I do remember finding this on a carboot sale and picked it up because it was from Intellect Games.

Board Game: The Sinking of the Titanic
Board Game: The Sinking of the Titanic

The Sinking of the Titanic was its original name until it got banned, even in the 70's it was still a sensitive subject, so Ideal renamed it 'Abandon Ship'.
Players must race around and rescue passengers from their state rooms and rush to the lifeboats before the ship sinks. After the ship sinks, you must get enough of food and water by visiting islands and/or drawing cards to stay alive until the rescue boat appears and the first one to make it there wins the game. The first half of the game is interesting as you move around the ship as it sinks, which is done by the sinking ship tilting around a central point. The second half could get a bit monotonous as you sail around the open sea until the rescue boat arrives.


The last blog in this series coming soon.
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Sat Dec 4, 2021 11:00 am
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Category: Science Fiction #12

Brian Moore
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Bolton
Lancashire
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BGG Description: Science Fiction games often have themes relating to imagined possibilities in the sciences. Such games need not be futuristic; they can be based on an alternative past. (For example, the writings of Jules Verne and the Star Wars saga are set before present time.) Many of the most popular Science Fiction games are set in outer space, and often involve alien races.

The 1st blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #1
The 2nd blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #2
The 3rd blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #3
The 4th blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #4
The 5th blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #5
The 6th blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #6
The 7th blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #7
The 8th blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #8
The 9th blob in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #9
The 10th blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #10
The 11th blog in this series is here: Category: Science Fiction #11

Here are some more games in the collection that come under this category.

Board Game: 4000 A.D.
Board Game: 4000 A.D.

4000 A.D. (1972) is a unique game of strategy set two thousand years in the future, when men have spread to the planets of other stars hundreds of light-years from the earth. An interstellar conflict between worlds is its subject. The concept of star travel by hyper-space is the basis of its unique playing character.
4000 A.D. is pure strategy, with no dice-based chance elements.
Fleets move using a hidden hyper-space movement system based on the distance between stars. No logging of hidden movement is required, all tracking is done openly which adds an element of guesswork and tension to the question of where opposing fleets in hyperspace are headed.
This is just an abstract strategy game where you spread your ships around the galaxy, but don't spread them too thin! It has a unique feel, and the multi-dimensional aspect is nice.

Board Game: Football Highlights 2052
Board Game: Football Highlights 2052

Football Highlights 2052 (2019) is like watching TV highlights of early 21st-century football games, with the game play being full of theme but with no time-outs or commercial breaks and all without bogging down in a play-by-play football simulation.
In this quick and interactive game, two players manage their teams, combining both strategy (building your team) and tactics (playing the game) without any downtime. During each half, players alternate playing ten cards to simulate a full game's highlights. Each card represents both an offensive and a defensive play, both of which will be used to resolve your opponent's and your own offensive plays.
A great follow-up to Baseball Highlights: 2045. The game play is fairly simple once you get the hang of it. This runs pretty smoothly and is lots of fun with a great solo opponent.

Board Game: Space Beans
Board Game: Space Beans

Space Beans (1999) by Uwe Rosenberg. This game is a spin-off to the popular Bohnanza but is less complex and is not based on trading.
Players attempt to collect 30 points in "trophies" to win the game. This is accomplished by working with up to two collections of space beans - 1 public (face-up) and 1 secret (face-down).
The primary mechanic is drawing beans, placing them in one of your collections (public or secret) if you have any matching cards to play, then passing your entire hand to the player on your right. If you compile a collection that contains a number of beans equal to the number value on one of beans in the collection, you may redeem the collection for the same amount of points on that card.
Very light with enough strategic decisions and luck to be playable by all levels. Consider this especially if you dislike the freewheeling bohnanza trading mechanics.

Board Game: Fzzzt!
Board Game: Fzzzt!

Fzzzt! (2009) by Tony Boydell where you are a mechanic, competing to buy robots as they become available on the factory's conveyor belt. Each game consists of five auction rounds; during each round, eight robot cards will be individually auctioned to the highest bidder though you won’t necessarily get to see all eight of the robots in advance - it all depends on how fast McPUD is running the conveyor belt!
I love clever little card games, deck building, and auctions. Fzzzt! has all three and they mesh together well for a great game. Not deeply strategic, but it combines the right amount of strategy and luck, plays quickly, and is easy to learn. My edition is the tinned version.

Board Game: Farlight
Board Game: Farlight

Farlight (2017) In the near future, talented space corporations and agencies set out to explore, mine, and colonize outer space. Your organisation will compete to design the most efficient and powerful spacecraft, to gather scientific knowledge, construct facilities on distant worlds, and transport colonists to the farthest reaches of our Solar System. Charge up the monster rocket boosters, crew up, and race for space!
Even though I KS's this, I didn't go into it with high expectations but was surprisingly impressed. The bidding mechanic is interesting and combined with the puzzle of how you build your ship, and keeping an eye on what other players are going for, this is a definite solid experience.

Board Game: Amoeba Wars
Board Game: Amoeba Wars

Amoeba Wars (1981) players play remnants of a fallen galactic civilization returning to its home sector, which had been overrun by space amoebae.
Starting from corners of a hexagonal board, players direct fleets of ships to capture solar systems and push back amoeba infestations and renegade doomsday machines (relics of the empire), trying to control the central solar systems and retake Saestor, the old homeworld, at the center of the board.
I've always considered it like Risk in space, but more fun than it's terrestrial counterpart with the amoebas. Picked this up in 2008 to add to my Avalon Hill collection.

Board Game: Expedition Zetta
Board Game: Expedition Zetta

Expedition Zetta (2018) includes 3D-models of spaceships, gorgeous art, and a modular game system. In this game for 1-5 players, you and your fellow travelers each represent a country in a maiden voyage of the first starship to ever use a newly developed warp drive. The goal is to brave the unknown and collect discoveries in four different star systems.
The revolutionary Zetta Planetary System Generator, used in the advanced game, can generate as many different star systems in the game as there are in the known universe, each with its own unique characteristics and its own name. Thus, no two voyages to the stars will ever be the same!
This is a ‪treat for a hard-scifi fan like myself. Create and sling your crew to randomly created star systems with as many combinations as there are actual stars to 3X them in peace.
When I saw this come up on KS, a game about space exploration, I knew I just had to have a copy, and I haven't been disappointed by it.

Board Game: Cosmic Cows
Board Game: Cosmic Cows

Cosmic Cows (2001) Player rolls all five dice, then may set aside any of them to establish any of the NINE zones (chance, 1, 2, 3, Kniffell, 4, 5, 6, straights)
Player may set aside, pick up, re-roll any dice up to THREE rolls while trying to create the best combination of dice to move a pawn(s).
Basically, a Yahtzee tug of war with cross-eyed cows. 2 player only, this is a fun and funny game - just a simple dice chucker with great components and an unusual theme where decisions revolve around choosing which dice to reroll and which cows to aim for.


Board Game: Niña & Pinta
Board Game: Niña & Pinta

Niña & Pinta (2016) This is the first of Ragnar Brothers three 'Quantum' games. Quantum physics tells us ‘the ability of quantum particles to occupy two states seemingly at once could be explained by both states co-existing in different universes’. So when you wave goodbye to your ship in your universe, someone else waves goodbye to their ship in a different parallel universe. But what would happen if these neighbouring universes, separated by the thinnest, gossamer barrier should somehow be breached and my ship sails into your world and searches for gold in competition to your ship?
This is a game of exploration of the New World where the great nations of Spain, England, France and Portugal send ships out to map the unknown and to bring home wealth to the Old World. This is a game where those ships will cross the divide and where no love is lost between Captains no matter which world it is! Explore, settle, fight if need be, and help your nation develop its Culture, Science, Religion and War-craft, to be the best in all worlds!
A very refreshing take on a board game with player interactions. Rules can a bit confusing at times due to the subject. Other than that it's a great game.

Board Game: Rivets
Board Game: Rivets

Rivets (1977) From the rulebook...
"The Boppers were robotic war machines. When the war ended and everyone was dead, the Boppers kept on fighting. But what else could you expect from robots with an average intelligence of an electric can opener?"
Rivets is a tactical level science fiction game of robotical warfare in the 22nd century. The players choose their robot armies, program them, and manoeuvre them to destroy the computer complex that controls the enemy's robots.
Metagaming produced several games in their metagame series and this was #5. They specialized in science fiction wargames; titles included Ogre, G.E.V., Godsfire, Stellar Conquest and WarpWar. This lighthearted game is much more fun than it should be!

Board Game: Star Trader
Board Game: Star Trader

Star Trader (1982) was free with Ares Magazine #12. It is a game of interstellar economics set in the 24th Century. Each of up to 6 players is master of a fleet of star faring trade vessels, competing with opponents to increase his own profits at the expense of the other players.
An great combination of combat, politics, economics and neat rules. It has everything all wrapped up in a compact game.

Board Game: Robot Master
Board Game: Robot Master

Robot Master (2008) by Reiner Knizia is a game of strategical placement as players have a deck of 36 robots with six cards each of values 0 to 5, and they want to maximize the value of their rows or columns of robots on a 5x5 grid. The value of a row is the sum of the robots in it, except that a pair of identical robots in a row is worth ten times the face value of a single robot. Whoever has the lowest-valued row or column at game's end loses.
A simple idea, where Knizia's maths background comes to the fore again.


The last blog in this series coming soon.
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Fri Dec 3, 2021 11:00 am
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Mechanic: Modular Board #10

Brian Moore
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Bolton
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Described on BGG as: Play occurs upon a modular board that is composed of multiple pieces, often tiles or cards.
In many games, board placement is randomized, leading to different possibilities for strategy and exploration.

BGG lists over 7000 that use this Mechanic of which I have 500+, so as you can tell, it's one of my favourite mechanics.

The first blog in this series is here: Mechanics: Modular Board
The 2nd blog in this series is here: Mechanics: Modular Board #2
The 3rd blog in this series is here: Mechanics: Modular Board #3
The 4th blog in this series is here: Mechanics: Modular Board #4
The 5th blog in this series is here: Mechanics: Modular Board #5
The 6th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Modular Board #6
The 7th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Modular Board #7
The 8th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Modular board #8
The 9th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Modular Board #9

Here are a few more:

Board Game: Galaxy's Edge
Board Game: Galaxy's Edge

Galaxy's Edge (2009) You are a flagship commander of one of the great galactic superpowers, navigating the fringe of the known galaxy in an effort to claim and colonize the many bountiful star systems in the region. Expansion can be achieved through rapid peaceful occupation, but you must also use the military resources at your disposal to seize enemy outposts and to protect your own.
Throughout the game you will need to support your colonization efforts with military strategy, which in turn will allow you to conquer valuable opposing colonies and thus score more points. Obtaining—and keeping—alien loyalties will be an important factor in determining a winner.
This is another great game from Andrei Burago, designer of Conquest of the Fallen Lands (2005). A great game with many paths to victory. Build colonies to gain VPs, build bases of different strengths to take them, play cards. Area Control with different pieces.

Board Game: Targui
Board Game: Targui

Targui (1988) has a board made of large square tiles representing the different types of desert ground. These provide varying economic and strategic value, from 0-5, and with a salt mine in the centre, and the random distribution makes a varied map each game.
Players have a village tile which they place on the outer edge, and start with some camels and money. Your turn simply consists of moving and buying camels, expanding your control of the land.
This has a variable board with easy rules, good gameplay and lots of fun & fighting. This is possibly one of the first games with a modular board that I bought.

Board Game: Gipsy King
Board Game: Gipsy King

Gipsy King (2007) Players build caravan routes across the board—in the free lands near the wonderful lakes—vying to attain the most popular and lucrative caravan spots for their families. When all the lands have been filled with caravans, points are awarded for controlling lakes with gold coins and connected caravans groups. After a second round (which entails some minor changes), the player with the most points is crowned as the Gipsy King.
This has you place units in areas according to numbered sequence and try to get control of the areas, and also have large connected groups. Good game.

Board Game: The Gnomes of Zavandor
Board Game: The Gnomes of Zavandor

The Gnomes of Zavandor (2011) Like most gnomes, you have two great passions: sparkling gems and wondrous machines.
The sought-after gemstones can be found around the mining town of Diamantina. They can be bought and sold at the gem exchange, shady traders are always willing to engage in a little wheeling and dealing, and then you can use the gems to claim valuable mining rights, artifacts and jewellery.
Zavandor is a fantasy setting which revolves around a capitalist economy based on trading in gems - sapphires, rubies, mystical gems etc. Other games in the family include The Mines of Zavandor (2010), and The Scepter of Zavandor (2004).
Getting an engine going and getting combos down in this game is really good fun. Nice to have a game with an active market that still works well with two.

Board Game: Dragonriders
Board Game: Dragonriders

Dragonriders (2005) Climb aboard your trusty steed and lift off for the race of your life! The players race their dragons on a course in a deep and winding canyon. You have some magic to use to aid your cause, or hinder your opponents, but the real test is your skill at manoeuvring your dragon through the course to reach the finish line ahead of the others. Players choose their speeds on each round secretly, but then must move at that speed, even if other dragons or canyon walls are in the way.
This race game is full of tense moments and exciting finishes. The theme is very good for someone who likes dragons, like me, and the mechanics of the race work well, the lightness of the dragons is abit of a problem, but these can be weighted with something.

Board Game: Medieval Mastery
Board Game: Medieval Mastery

Medieval Mastery (2012) is a board game of tactical conquest based on the feudal system that existed in Europe throughout the Middle Ages. Set in France, during a time of turmoil, each player assumes the role of a provincial lord as the country erupts into a war of succession. Send your brave knights forth to conquer the surrounding lands in an all-out struggle to claim the throne!
Medieval Mastery incorporates area control, hand management and a modular board design as well as variable player powers and phase order. The rules also include alternate gameplay variations.
I have had fun with this when it comes to the table. The random cards always make for an enjoyable game, and the tile placement for board creation is also fun.

Board Game: Walls of York
Board Game: Walls of York

Walls of York (2019) players must use the plastic wall pieces to construct a defensive barrier around the buildings on their city map. Each turn, a player rolls the building die, that dictates which types of walls are to be used. The players must enclose their city, including the required buildings from the King's decree — but players must beware for the Vikings will come and lay waste at the end of the first age, forcing players to build their walls anew in the second age. The player with the most coins at the end of the second age wins.
A very good and polished family game that offers meaningful choices even in the simplicity of its rules. I went out of my way to get hold of this, finally hetting a copy from a BGGUser.

Board Game: Die Magier von Pangea
Board Game: Die Magier von Pangea

Die Magier von Pangea (2001) A game with a modular board in which land-tiles can be moved around on a sea, hence Pangea. There are five different tile types, for each of which there is a tribe that can produce goods there. Each player has tribes in only three types. A tile has a maximum number of inhabitants, no production takes place if there are more tribes on a tile.
The game is won by obtaining amulets, these can only be bought from opposing tribes which are currently producing. Amulets increase the magical power of a player. Magic can be used create new tribes or move neutral ones around, but can also be used to move land-tiles around.
This is a very original game, revolutionary for its time because of the moving board and the high replayability.
This game only ever had a German release, however it has no in-game text. One of the ways I used to look for unusual games was to hunt them out in geeklists and then research them and that's how this game got into the collection in 2012.

Board Game: Cannes: Stars, Scripts and Screens
Board Game: Cannes: Stars, Scripts and Screens

Cannes: Stars, Scripts and Screens (2002) has each player in the role of a small-time movie producer, trying to produce as many movies as possible. The game can be played by 2 to 4 people and takes 45 to 90 minutes, depending on the number of players and their gaming experience.
In this early Splotter Spellen game, the theming and art are just right and the game has got a fair bit of meat on its bones.
I bought this in 2012 when I was trying to collect all the Splotter games.

Board Game: Relic Expedition
Board Game: Relic Expedition

Relic Expedition (2014) is a jungle exploration game with a variable board, hand management, collectible treasures, and dangerous wild animals (the animeeples)!
The game board starts small, with only a few of the tiles revealed. As players explore the jungle, new tiles are revealed and the board grows in unpredictable ways, making for a completely different game each time. Hidden in the jungle, you'll find six different types of treasures made of six different materials. To win, you must collect four matching treasures — either four of the same type or four of the same material — and fly away from the jungle to victory.
If you hope to travel through the terrain and survive the dangers of the jungle to get that treasure, though, you'll also need supplies like machetes, mountain climbing gear, panther traps, tranquilizer darts, vines, and more. You carry treasures and supplies in your backpack, but your backpack space is limited! As the game progresses, you'll have to choose carefully. As you find more treasure, you'll have to make tough decisions about which supplies you have to leave behind.
There is the entire mystery of a gameboard that is unrevealed to the players: this ensures a different playing experience each and every time. This is easy to learn, addictive to play and, ultimately, very well thought out.
I missed the KS, but was able to pick up a full KS version in 2015 from a BGGUser, after seeing a 'Watch It Played' video playthrough made me think that this was my kind of game. I wasn't wrong.

Board Game: Rescue Polar Bears: Data & Temperature
Board Game: Rescue Polar Bears: Data & Temperature

Rescue Polar Bears: Data & Temperature (2018) is a cooperative game based on Rescue Polar Bears with a new data and temperature system added to the game design to make the strategy more diversified.
The consumption of fossil fuel and releasing of greenhouse gases yield the global warming. Around the north pole, the last icebergs are melting and the polar bears are facing the risk of being extinct. The players form a scientific organization. They try to collect data about climate change to persuade the governments to change their energy policy. At the same time, they also need to prevent polar bears from sinking into the freezing water.
Each player drives a rescue ship of different ability to complete the mission on the Arctic Ocean. As long as the players collectively gather enough data, they win together. However, if too many polar bears sink into the water, everyone loses.
This cute-looking game is actually quite a fun co-op game in a similar sort of vein to Pandemic whereby each turn you take your actions and then the board throws up new problems for the next player to deal with.

Board Game: Space Maze
Board Game: Space Maze

Space Maze (2011) is a eurogame with an alien theme. In the game, each player represents an alien species. The goal is to steal an ancient relic from a massive structure floating in space. The players compete against each other, all trying to bring home the Relic.
The gameplay mechanics are based around a maze made up out of primary coloured doorways (red, blue and yellow), two doorways touching each other make a combination of colours that can (or not if the two colours are the same) form a secondary colour. The aliens you play with are made up out of these secondary colours, each player has three aliens: 1 green, 1 orange and 1 purple. Aliens can only pass through doorways that form their secondary colour...
A good filler game with the ability to scale play time to suit. There's a definite race element since the alien with the magic hat can go anywhere, getting it early is a clear advantage and can lead to a win unless the wearer is cornered. Fun and clever.


The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Mechanic: Card Drafting #12

Brian Moore
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BGGs description for 'Card-Drafting':
Open Drafting is used in games in which players pick cards (or tiles, resources, dice, etc) from a common pool, to gain some advantage (immediate or longterm) or to assemble collections that are used to meet objectives within the game.

Saint Petersburg is a well-known game utilizing an open draft.
Azul utilizes a more complex draft, where tiles are selected from multiple constructed lots, with some reverting to the common pool.

There are 776 games I own listed on BGG in this category - out of around 5000 listed on BGG - that's quite a few.

The 1st blog on card drafting is here: Mechanic: Card drafting
The 2nd blog on card drafting is here: Mechanic: Card drafting #2
The 3rd blog on card drafting is here: Mechanic: Card drafting #3
The 4th blog on card drafting is here: Mechanic: Card drafting #4
The 5th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Card drafting #5
The 6th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Card drafting #6
The 7th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Card drafting #7
The 8th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Card drafting #8
The 9th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Card Drafting #9
The 10th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Card Drafting #10
The 11th blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Card Drafting #11


This is a special blog for me in a way, as a year ago on Dec 1st 2020 is when I began to start blogging and I still enjoy doing this.
I must also give a mention to
Caroline Black
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who does her blog The Dyslexic Gamer and which was the inspiration for mine.

Over the past year I have done some 3500 games, some have been mentioned several times as it depends how many categories/mechanics each game has. It took me 3 or 4 attempts before I settled into a format I like and which does what I set out for it to do.

As I said in my first blog:
"Hopefully, you're still reading and found it of interest. The games in my collection are all there for a reason - and all have a story why they are there, how they got there, what happened when they got played.
For me, it's going to get some memories out of my head and into print.
For you, I hope you find it interesting enough to subscribe to it."

I hope I have kept to this as we I forward into my 2nd year.

Here is another selection of my games that list one of the mechanics as Card-Drafting.

Board Game: Kahuna
Board Game: Kahuna

Kahuna (1998) is part of the Kosmos two-player series and possibly the game that got me interested in collecting their two player games.
Kahuna is played on a board depicting twelve islands. Players use cards to place bridges between these islands or remove opponent's bridges. If you get the majority of bridges around an island, you place one of your marker stones on it and also remove any of your opponent's bridges to that island – which might cause them to lose a bridge majority on an adjacent island and lose a marker stone there.
In this game, you can screw your opponent right if you get your strategy right and remember what cards got played. I don't card-count, but I try to remember the last few played.
One of the first in the Kosmos 2-player series that came into the collection.

Board Game: Tang Garden
Board Game: Tang Garden

Tang Garden (2020) The Tang dynasty was considered the first golden age of the classical and now iconic Chinese gardens. Emperor Xuanzong built the magnificent imperial Garden of the Majestic Clear Lake as an homage of life itself and from where he ruled. Players will act as Imperial Garden Designers and they will be called to build the most incredible garden while balancing the elements of Nature.
Tang Garden is a Zen-like game that will take you to the first golden age of China, where players will progressively build a garden by creating the landscape, placing the scenery and projecting their vision through vertical panoramas. During the construction, noblemen will visit the garden to admire the surroundings and the way the natural elements coexist in the most breath-taking scenery humankind has ever laid their eyes upon.
Really nice components, beautifully made. The game mechanism is actually quite clever, with different strategies to achieve more victory points.
Besides some mini-expansions and metal coins:
Tang Garden: Golden Age mainly added 16 Garden tiles, 8 Characters, 5 Decorations, 6 Landscapes.
Tang Garden: Ghost Stories mainly added the Fox Ghost The Demon, and the Ghost Soldier


Board Game: Roma
Board Game: Arena: Roma II
Board Game: Roma

Roma (2005) by Stefan Feld features both card and dice play. Players place cards at "dice stations" numbered 1-6. The player uses dice rolled each turn to activate dice stations to use the card that has been placed at a station. Card effects guide your tactical actions in the game through manipulating cards in play, providing money or granting victory points.
An great dice and card game. The theme is somewhat shallow, but the gameplay is very compelling.
Arena: Roma II (2009) is a complete game of its own, but it may also be combined with the cards from Roma.

Board Game: Tribune: Primus Inter Pares
Board Game: Tribune: Primus Inter Pares

Tribune: Primus Inter Pares (2007) In ancient Rome, tribunes were highly esteemed individuals elected by the people to represent them politically and militarily. Players take on the role of a powerful and ambitious patrician family. By applying influences and manipulating controls over the various factions, they attempt to pave their way to victory in order to attain the high office of the tribune.
Tribune effectively mixes a lot of game mechanics and does so in a successful and enjoyable way. With worker placement, card collection, and multiple paths to victory, it harnesses a lot of fun. Add in a Roman theme that I always enjoy, and I find this game to be a winner.
In 2008 Tribune: Expansion added a new family which operates in the shadows to reach their goals and has no scruples.

Board Game: The Ancient World
Board Game: The Ancient World

The Ancient World (2014) by Ryan Laukat is set in an ancient world forgotten by time, enormous titans terrorize the land. Five tribes have been fleeing from the titans for centuries, but things are about to change. Players compete to grow the largest and most influential city-state by managing citizens, treasury, and military and by defeating titans. Players take turns sending citizens to take special actions or using military cards to attack titans. One of the actions a citizen can perform is to build Empire cards, which give more citizens, money, and abilities.
A city-state's influence in the world is measured by sets of tribe banners that it owns. Each Empire card has one or more tribe banners, and tribe banners can also be gained by defeating titans.
What a lovely game. I love the setting and gameplay. There are multiple strategies and ways to get points, including blocking your opponents if you desire.
In 2019 it was reimplemented as The Ancient World (Second Edition) with several tweaks to gameplay such as new and revised titans that now attack you!

Board Game: Steam Park
Board Game: Steam Park

Steam Park (2013) As owners of a fantastic steam park, you're to build gigantic, coal-powered rides to attract as many visitors as you can – but building attractions won't be enough. You'll also need to manage your employees, invest in advertising in order to attract and please the different kinds of guests visiting your park, and, above all, keep the dirt that your park produces under strict control!
Steam Park is an easy-to-learn game with two difficulty levels: one for the less experienced gamers and a more strategic one for those who want a more exciting challenge. In this management game, you'll have to build your own amusement park and make it the largest and most profitable in the region. By constructing the three-dimensional, wonderful rides designed by Marie Cardouat, you will see your park grow right before your eyes.
Really fun family game. Build a theme park by rolling dice to take actions. 3D components are cardboard, but really fun and visually catching and fun to build.
Two mini-expansions for it were released in 2016:
Steam Park: Play Dirty is a modular expansion that allows you to introduce many different new features one at a time — or all together.
Steam Park: Robots is a mini-expansion adding 51 robot figures to replace the wooden Roboburgers from the Steam Park base game.

Board Game: Rialto
Board Game: Rialto

Rialto (2013) by Stefan Feld In the card-driven board game Rialto, the game board displays the six districts of Venice, and players earn VPs for placing council members into these, for building bridges, placing gondolas to connect the districts with one another, and for building advantageous buildings.
I like the simple card play in this game, although I feel like it's difficult for some to grasp strategies on the first play. Holding back cards to play them next round is probably more powerful than it first seems. Similar to Feld's Strasbourg in some ways: about the same level of complexity and playtime.

Board Game: Villagers
Board Game: Villagers

Villagers (2019) You are the founder of a new village during the middle ages, in the years after a great plague. The loss of so many people has created big problems for the survivors. Many of the people the villagers used to depend on for essential things like food, shelter and clothes are gone. Craftsmen find themselves without suppliers of raw materials, traders have lost their customers and many have lost their farms and workshops as they escaped the plague.
The roads are full of refugees seeking a new beginning. They come to you, hoping to settle down on your land and make a living. Your grain farm is the ideal starting point for a village, reliably providing food for many people. You must choose wisely who you allow to settle with you, as your food and resources are limited.
I introduced this to Anne and my daughter recently and they loved it, having played 10 games of it to date. This is a well designed, fast and entertaining game with lots of replayability.
In 2021 Streets which is a tile-laying game from the same publisher has been released.
In 2022 Villagers: Shifting Seasons is due for release which will feature several new modules for the Villagers base game

Board Game: First Class: All Aboard the Orient Express!
Board Game: First Class: All Aboard the Orient Express!

First Class: All Aboard the Orient Express! (2016) is designed by Helmut Ohley who has designed several 18xx games, as well as Russian Railroads (2013). First Class is a card game that includes aspects of board games, creating a unique and dynamic experience every time you play. Cards represent your train cars and provide a visual reminder of your empire's growth as they extend out from your player board. On top of that, every game of First Class uses two of five interchangeable decks of action cards. Each deck provides new challenges for building your rail empire.
That it has different modules, has very little randomness, and the cascade of chain reactions at the end is very good. Some have called it a “super filler,” and that is what I like about it. The design is simple and intuitive, and the game play is quite satisfying.

Board Game: Legacy: Gears of Time
Board Game: Legacy: Gears of Time

Legacy: Gears of Time (2012) is a strategic card game, mechanically rooted in its time travel theme. Players each play cards from their own hand, draw from a central draw pile, move and play technologies on a single timeline, while placing their influence cubes on existing technologies.
Legacy is played on a timeline that grows at the end of each of 4 rounds. Players take turns during a round consisting of 3 actions each. During each turn, you may travel back in time, play a technology card from your hand, influence an existing technology, or draw two cards (keeping only one).
As you travel back in time, Technologies are played from your hand by paying their discard cost.
A fun strategy game of time travel, difficult to do in a board game. Players travel back in time to establish technologies along a timeline while fighting for control of those technologies or attempting to establish technologies in an earlier part of the timeline.

Board Game: Tides of Time
Board Game: Tides of Time

Tides of Time (2015) is a drafting game for two players. Each game consists of three rounds in which players draft cards from their hands to build their kingdom. Each card is one of five suits and also has a scoring objective. After all cards have been drafted for the round, players total their points based on the suits of cards they collected and the scoring objectives on each card, then they record their score. Each round, the players each select one card to leave in their kingdom as a "relic of the past" to help them in later rounds. After three rounds, the player with the the most prosperous kingdom wins.
Surprising how this game brings depth and strategy in just 18 cards! When drafting, you need to take into account the symbols you have, the ones you target, what you don't want to leave to your opponent, and you need to remember what is in each hand so you know what to expect back.

Board Game: San Marco
Board Game: San Marco

San Marco (2001) by Alan R. Moon and Aaron Weissblum where players are attempting to score the most points by building up influence in the districts of Venice via their aristocrats. The game uses a card distribution mechanic whereby (in the case of a four-player game) two players draw cards and divide them up into two piles each, the other two players pick one group and the remaining groups go to the players who formed the groups. The action cards allow players to place and remove aristocrats, erect and move bridges, and score individual regions. The entire game lasts three Passages and each Passage may contain several turns.
This game has simple and clever rules, a gorgeous board and bits and a lot of decision making. The splitting and choosing method for the action cards is one of the best things on this game.
In 2002 it was reimplemented as a card game Canal Grande


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Wed Dec 1, 2021 11:00 am
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Mechanic: Action Points #3

Brian Moore
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BGG Description: A player receives a number of Action Points on their turn. They may spend them on a variety of Actions.
The earliest example of a game listed on Boardgamegeek that uses AP's is Special Train (1948).

BGG lists over 6000 games that use this mechanic

The 1st blog in this series is here: Mechanic: Action Points #1
The 2nd blog in this series is here: Mechanic Action Points #2

Here are some more of the ones in the collection:

Board Game: Kanban: Driver's Edition
Board Game: Kanban: Driver's Edition

Kanban: Driver's Edition (2014) takes a car assembly line as its setting. Kanban is a Japanese word for a lean, efficient assembly line in order to expedite and smooth workflow.
The players are ambitious managers who are trying to impress the board of directors in order to achieve as high a position as possible in the company and secure their careers.
You need to manage suppliers and supplies, improve automobile parts, innovate — anything to stay on the cutting edge, or getting your hands greasy on the assembly line in order to boost production.
A game by Vital Lacerda, this heavy euro really blew me away... your first game will be your learning game, but after that, it's like his other games: a beautiful, intricate puzzle that will surprise and delight every time.

Board Game: Burgle Bros.
Board Game: Burgle Bros.

Burgle Bros. (2015) is a cooperative game for 1-­4 players. Players are unique members of a crew trying to pull off a robbery of a highly secure building — without getting caught. The building has three floors (4x4 tiles), each with its own safe to crack. Players start on the first floor and have to escape to their helicopter waiting on the roof.
Love this game and really lends itself to thematic situations and memorable encounters. One of those games where it's fun to talk about afterwards.
In 2021 Burgle Bros 2: The Casino Capers was released where they have now decided to take down a string of casinos. But this is no office job — tougher safes, tightened security, and, perhaps worst of all, you'll be working during the day!

Board Game: Android
Board Game: Android

Android (2008) is a board game of murder and conspiracy set in a dystopian future. Detectives travel between the city of New Angeles and moon colony Heinlein chasing down leads, calling in favors, and uncovering the sinister conspiracy beneath it all. The detectives must balance their pursuit of the murderer against their personal lives and their inner demons. Android’s innovative mechanics ensure that no two detectives play alike.
During a round, the players get action points to spend on various actions, like moving their detectives, following leads that appear on locations, solving their personal demons, or doing a location-specific action.
This is the kind of game that leaves you thinking about all that happened for long after the it's over. The theme is excellently implemented and it really manages to convey the sense of dread and tension you'd expect from the cyberpunk future genre.

Board Game: Macao
Board Game: Macao

Macao (2009) the mysterious port city on the southern coast of China – is a Portuguese trading post in the Far East. The players take on the role of energetic and daring adventurers. Many exciting tasks and challenges await the players, whether they are a captain, governor, craftsman, or scholar. Those who chose the wisest course of action and have the best overall strategy will earn the most prestige at the end. #13 in the Alea big box series.
I really enjoyed this Stefan Feld game. Like some of Feld's other games, you have to manage something so you don't take negative points. This one you have to manage your cards and getting action cubes for each turn. Easier said than done.

Board Game: Torres
Board Game: Torres

Torres (1999) by Kramer and Kiesling is an abstract game of resource management and tactical pawn movement. Players are attempting to build up castles and position their knights to score the most points each turn. Players have a limited supply of knights and action cards that allow special actions to be taken. Efficient use of pieces and cards, along with a thoughtful awareness of future possibilities, is the heart of this game.
Great game that's easy to learn and understand. A great abstract game using action point, and cards with neat powers. I like the fact that you don't have enough turns to use all your cards but each power is useful in it's time and place.
My copy is the Rio Grande Games green box version from 1999, but I just love how the game builds up in 3D, similar to the designers 2015 game Porta Nigra (2015).

Board Game: Altiplano
Board Game: Altiplano

Altiplano (2017) is a bag-building game along the lines of Orléans, set in the South American highlands of the Andes (the "Altiplano"). The competition for limited resources is considerable, as it was in Orléans, but the greater focus in Altiplano is on building up your own production to be the best that it can be - or at least better than that of the other players!
Each player starts with a unique role tile, giving them access to different goods and methods of production. Players have limited access to production at the start, but they can acquire additional production sites during the game that open up new options. The various types of goods — such as fish, alpaca, cacao, silver and corn — all have their own characteristics and places where they can be used.
Collect your goods, exchange them for better ones, travel the Andes, fulfil orders, build boats and houses, and store your resources at the right moment! There is a lot to do in this game, a lot of different paths!
In 2018 Altiplano: The Traveler adds the traveller, so the planning of moves in Altiplano becomes more important and accessibility to resources becomes more interactive.

Board Game: Dungeon Twister
Board Game: Dungeon Twister

Dungeon Twister (2004) by Christophe Boelinger is a 2-player high level strategy game where 2 teams of adventurers with various powers are trapped in a dungeon. The board is composed of 8 rooms that can be moved and rotated by the players. Each turn, a player is able to spend actions to move around the dungeon, pick up and use items, battle with the opponents team, or turn and move the rooms of the dungeon.
The goal is to reach 5 victory points. Points are collected by moving adventurers out of the dungeon or by killing an opponent's adventurer. Objects are disseminated across the whole dungeon and will bring the adventurers well-needed powers.
It's a very strategic game with a fantasy theme that makes it less abstract and a bluffing component that makes it more exciting.
There were seven expansions all together and I have them all except Dungeon Twister: Créatures Sylvestres. If you want to know more about them, see my blog Mechanics: Modular Board #2 for more details.

Board Game: Jambo
Board Game: Jambo

Jambo (2004) first appeared in 2004 and was picked up and produced in English by Rio Grande Games. Players take on the role of merchants offering their wares from market stands. On a player's turn, he has five actions to choose from. Actions can be used to draw cards, play cards, and activate build-up cards. The game's attraction lies with the many special cards.
Jambo is a great two player game in the Kosmos 2-player series. It brings Puerto Rico-like resource management to the 2 player genre.
The game became so popular that in 2007 Jambo Expansion added 3 new modules and in 2009 Jambo Expansion 2 was released which added 3 more modules for even more variety.

Board Game: Last Will
Board Game: Last Will: Getting Sacked
Board Game: Last Will: Getting Sacked

Last Will (2011) In his last will, your rich uncle stated that all of his millions will go to the nephew who can enjoy money the most. How to find out which nephew should be rich? You will each be given a large amount of money and whoever can spend it first will be the rightful heir.
Each player starts with a certain amount of money, an individual player board, two errand boys and two cards in some combination of properties and helpers. At the start of each round, lay out cards from the appropriate decks on the offering boards; the four regular decks are properties, companions, events, helpers and expenses, with special cards forming a deck of their own. The particular mix of cards varies by round and by the number of players.
This is about trying to create an engine that you have to tear apart to win, with lots of options and quite a few ways to manipulate your position. Trying to lose all your money instead of gaining more takes a bit of getting used to, but that's what makes this game so good.
It's great fun the way that you are actively seeking to lose money. So strategic yet tactical within the card drawing and worker placement.
Several mechanics, like worker placement, tableau building, action point allowance, card drafting, turn order track, money management, and market management all come together in one package that feels complete.

Board Game: Amerigo
Board Game: Amerigo

Amerigo (2013) by Stefan Feld has the players help Amerigo Vespucci on his journey to discover new land. The players explore the islands of South America, secure trading routes, and build settlements.
The game board is composed of nine, twelve or sixteen tiles, depending on the number of players. Players sail their ships through the landscape created for this game, landing on islands to plan and build settlements, which then supply resources and allow the player to earn victory points.
A very different feel than most of the other Feld's, however it still had the optional point gainers that he has become known for.
Love the cube tower and the Tetris-like tiles. Also like the player interactions!

Board Game: Fire & Axe: A Viking Saga
Board Game: Fire & Axe: A Viking Saga
Board Game: Fire & Axe: A Viking Saga

Fire & Axe: A Viking Saga (2007) Norse law dictates that every man shall posses a weapon at all times. The need to swiftly wield an axe in the name of battle, honor, or revenge was ever-present. Valhalla will not be filled with the weak.
In Fire & Axe: A Viking Saga, originally released as Viking Fury(2004), you vie for glory across three epic Viking sagas, each one a different journey to raid, trade, and settle territories.
Start your journey by gathering crew and goods to outfit your boat. After your launch from bustling ports into the open sea, you must choose your path to power — but don't get lost in the wind; the sea will gladly devour souls who take her lightly...
This game has chance, strategy, and time management that all play a part. There are many paths to victory. The theme is very well integrated into this game.

Board Game: Wallenstein
Board Game: Wallenstein

Wallenstein (2002) This area control game has player actions that include the conquest of new countries, tax collection, erection of buildings, feeding the populace, victualing the army, etc. Some actions increase the chance for unrest, and expensive rebellions can occur. The strongest power at the end wins.
Seems like it will be difficult to play but the mechanics are simple. The tower is a great randomiser that makes the battles fun. This is a war game that doesn't quite feel like a war game, which suits me.
Then, in 2006, the game was reimplemented as Shogun which moved the action to Japan in which each player assumes the role of a great Daimyo, leading their troops to conquer the provinces of the Japanese islands.
In 2012, Queen released Wallenstein (Second Edition). The setting and game play of the two games are mostly the same. Two expansions were included: "Emperor's Court," and "Landsknechte."
My copy is the 2002 German version.


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Tue Nov 30, 2021 11:00 am
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Category: American West #3

Brian Moore
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Bolton
Lancashire
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BGG Description: American West games often have themes or storylines set in the Western United States during the latter half of the 19th century. Some of the themes and imagery found in the most popular American West games concerns cowboys, sheriffs, outlaws, prospecting, colonization, and railways, among others.

BGG has over 1000 games listed in this category of which a fraction of these have made it into the collection.

The 1st blog in this series is here: Category: American West #1
The 2nd blog in this series is here: Category: American West #2

Let’s take a look at what I have:

Board Game: Sierra West
Board Game: Sierra West

Sierra West (2019) In the late 1840s, thousands of pioneers headed out West to seek wealth and opportunity. Many of these brave souls traveled by wagon over the Sierra Nevada mountain range, into what would soon become the Golden State of California. In the game Sierra West, you are an expedition leader who must guide a party of rough-and-ready pioneers—employing a clever mix of strategy and tactics with each step.
Sierra West comes with four sets of special cards and parts, each of which can be combined with the game's basic components to create a unique mode of play. During setup, the players choose a mode, then build a mountain of overlapping cards with the corresponding deck. Each mode adds new thematic content, alternate paths to victory, and interesting twists on the core mechanics.
I love the different modules that come in this game and the new 'path building' mechanic mixed with a little deck building. The options here are really cool as well. I like the way you can help one traveller across the path with the other and then you can also move one then move the other then move the first some more in whatever order you need to be the most strategic. Great game.

Board Game: Pioneer Days
Board Game: Pioneer Days

Pioneer Days (2018) is a dice-drafting game reminiscent of The Oregon Trail. While you pursue your strategy, you must be prepared for impending disasters such as storms, disease, raids, and famine.
Round by round, players draw dice out of the bag, roll them, then take turns drafting one to either collect silver, hire a townsfolk, or take an action based on the die value. Townsfolk confer immediate or constant benefits as well as end game scoring bonuses, while actions help you collect wood, medicine, cattle, equipment, and gold nuggets. The unchosen die each round advances one of the disaster tracks based on its colour, and when a disaster gets to the end of its track, all players must deal with its effects.
Pioneer Days is a fantastic dice drafting game that scales very well and is great at any player count. There is a ton of variability offered through the 8 player boards, the 5 different decks of townsfolk, the town deliveries, the different equipment cards and the risk management of the impending disasters.
This is a well designed game that will appeal to a wide group of gamers.

Board Game: Cavum
Board Game: Cavum

Cavum (2008) by Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling In the mountain there are veins of precious stones. The players build tunnels in the mountain, establish stations in the mountain and in the city, discover veins of precious stones, acquire precious stones, and sell them. The players get points for stations in the city and for selling precious stones. The winner is the player with the most points.
On your turn, play 1-4 of your 12 actions. These allow you to place tracks, stations, or veins. Gems (6 types, 9 tokens each) each have their own market where they are stored and which set their max sell price. The last action is prospecting, where you create a path from one of your stations to another, passing through as many veins as possible: take one gem from each vein.
Combines together tile placement, a limited action points system, variable turn order, an "inverse" bidding system and an exciting end game count, and you get this great game.

Board Game: Cowboys: The Way of the Gun
Board Game: Cowboys: The Way of the Gun

Cowboys: The Way of the Gun (2007) The game features stand-up Cowboy Counters artistically designed with full colour artwork by Gary S. Zaboly. There are 26 Historical and Hollywood style scenarios in the game. Six double-sided geomorphic mapboards create the battlegrounds of the Old West.
The game rules allow you to pick up and play the game in minutes. The optional rules add chrome but still keeps the game very playable. The "Old West" personalities are there; Wyatt, Doc, Jesse, Billy, and many other legends of the Wild West. Some of the variables include town folk, horses, etc.
Bank robberies, cattle rustling, stagecoach holdups, jail breaks, lynch mobs, and many other western actions are depicted. It pits opposing sides against each other, bringing to life the daring and dastardly deeds of heroes and villains when the way of the gun ruled the day.
I like this game a lot. The artwork fits very well, and game play is straight forward. The theme works well, and keeps players engaged.

Board Game: Deadlands: Doomtown
Board Game: Deadlands: Doomtown

Deadlands: Doomtown (1998) One of the more unusual trading card games that was on the market, Doomtown has players taking the part of gangs, called 'outfits,' trying to gain control of the California boomtown known as Gomorrah, in the same Weird West setting as the popular Deadlands RPG. A player wins at the end of a turn if he or she has more victory points + control points than any other player.
Doomtown was set apart from other games in TCG market by its unique poker-based combat resolution, as well as by the way in which the town is built up through the game by the use of Deed cards.
This was the game that finally weaned me and my son off MTG. After playing this, we never went back to MTG, despite having hundreds of cards for it. Each faction had a distinctive feeling. If it was just for that the game would have been just OK. But what made it outstanding is that your play deck must have 52 cards and to resolve combat you deal yourself a hand of poker!
Then in 2014, along came this:

Board Game: Doomtown: Reloaded
Board Game: Doomtown: Reloaded

Doomtown: Reloaded (2014) The classic collectible card game Deadlands: Doomtown returned as an Expandable Card Game in Doomtown: Reloaded. It featured four factions fighting for control of Gomorra, California. Doomtown: Reloaded allows you to build your own deck from a fixed set of cards in the box. Play your dudes to control deeds in the town, and use actions, hexes, and more to thwart your opponents.
Shootouts are still resolved via a poker mechanism as every card has a suit and value. Preparing for the hands you want to draw is as much a part of deck building as choosing the actions and dudes you'll want to play.
By this time my son had emigrated to Australia, but having fond memories of the game I went ahead and bought the first 13 expansions! By that time the box became full, so I stopped collecting them.

Board Game: Bison: Thunder on the Prairie
Board Game: Bison: Thunder on the Prairie

Bison: Thunder on the Prairie (2006) by Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling has players representing a native American Indian tribe. Aim is to settle in an area rich of bison, fish and turkeys. The tribe need bison as food and clothes (leather), they need fish for food and the turkeys and their feathers for rituals and adornment. The players catch bison, fish and turkeys and keep the score as markers on their own overview board.
One of the best area control games in my collection. I like the theme, one the reasons I bought it (the other being its buy my favourite design duo). It´s not that easy to explain to new players though.

Board Game: Wacky Wacky West
Board Game: Wacky Wacky West
Board Game: Wacky Wacky West

Wacky Wacky West (1991) Fans of Klaus Teuber will be interested in this remake/redesign of Drunter und Drüber, a 1991 Spiel des Jahres winner.
Just south of nowhere, there's the junction of the Mayfair & Rossdorf RR and the Turvy Trunk Line. Springing up from the desert like a tumbleweed lies the eccentric little town of Rossdorf. Like most western towns, Rossdorf has a Land Agent: Guy Dough, the brother of that wicked varmint Black Benny. A shrewd opportunist, Guy's done sold all the town land ('ceptin' the outhouses) four times over! Every acre in town that ain't got an outhouse on it is owned by the miners, the railroads, AND the fort captain. Just about a year ago, miners digging in the shadow of Fort Rossdorf struck the mother lode! But it wasn't gold, and it wasn't silver. No, my friend, it was just a little spring. Not any ordinary spring, though! It was a torrent of that mind-marbling drink the locals call "Wacky Water!"
In Wacky Wacky West you and your fellow townfolk place track tiles, street tiles, and river tiles hoping to destroy your rivals' buildings. Every time someone tries to build over a precious outhouse, the town votes!
This will please non-gamers as an easy introduction to tile placement crossed with voting. Good fun and a light challenge.
In 2010 Mayfair changed it's name from Drunter und Druber and gave it a western theme. I had bought the German version years ago, so never did get the Mayfair version.

Board Game: Circle the Wagons
Board Game: Circle the Wagons

Circle the Wagons (2017) has players fixin' to build up their own boomtown, but only one'll build the best in the West!
Blaze a trail by draftin' cards 'round the circle and placin' 'em in yer town, tryin' to connect matchin' territories to score prosperity points! But don't forget about them three bonus cards in the center of the circle that can score ya even more points — that is, if ya play yer cards right. With over 800 unique ways to score and millions of draftin' and placin' combos, you'll never build the same town twice!
This is hands down one of the best pocket games from Button Shy, as well as one of the best 2 player tile based game that I own. Considering it started out as an 18-card pnp game, it's just great fun to play.

Board Game: Western Town
Board Game: Western Town

Western Town (2005) each player is a Marshal of an expanding town in the Old West of the U.S. in the early 1860s. Each Marshal wants to develop the most prosperous town, one that President Lincoln himself would be proud to visit.
The three principal criteria that allow you to win the game are population growth, charm/attractiveness, and wealth, as measured by gold. Turns are regulated by the visits of Lincoln, who determines, bit-by-bit, the value of the towns relative to those three criteria. These criteria can and do change every round, and you will need to adapt to these changing criteria to win this game!
How to mix guess, double guess and ressources management. Very original, I really like it.

Board Game: Carcassonne: Gold Rush
Board Game: Carcassonne: Gold Rush

Carcassonne: Gold Rush (2014) was the 2nd in the 'Around the World' series. Here, players are in the 19th century in the United States when cowboys drove cattle, trappers traded with Native Americans, the first railway routes appeared, and explorers — that is, the players — sent their henchmen to gold mines to laboriously search for gold nuggets. Depending on where you place your tent, you might be able to snatch a nugget from another explorer.
Gold Rush is such great fun. I love having the random luck factor of the mining areas. I also think how the cities work in this over vanilla Carcassonne is a lot neater of an idea with having the trains connecting everything.

Board Game: Way Out West
Board Game: Way Out West

Way Out West (2000) by Martin Wallace is a western themed game, players are looking to drive cattle across the west, establishing towns. If you don't like the way something is going, you can fight other players for control with your cowboys. You can rob the bank, rustle cattle, and shoot those pesky farmers!
This is an early Wallace area control euro with high player interaction and with a engaging theme. Good job of capturing the "Old West".


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Mon Nov 29, 2021 11:00 am
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Mechanic: Area Control #1

Brian Moore
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Mechanic: Area Majority/Influence

BGG Description: Area Control Games where multiple players may occupy a space and gain benefits based on their proportional presence in the space.

In El Grande, for instance, players earn their score in a region by having the most caballeros in that region.

BGG has over 5,500 games using the Area Control mechanic, which they call Area Majority/Influence.
Here are the ones in the collection:

Board Game: El Grande
Board Game: El Grande

El Grande (1995) by Wolfgang Kramer and Richard Ulrich. In this award-winning game, players take on the roles of Grandes in medieval Spain. The king's power is flagging, and these powerful lords are vying for control of the various regions.
A turn consists of selecting one of five action cards that allow variations to the rules and additional scoring opportunities in addition to determining how many caballeros to move from your court to one or more of the regions on the board (or into the castillo - a secretive tower).
The goal is to have a caballero majority in as many regions (and the castillo) as possible during a scoring round.
This is one of my long-time favourite games. It has very clever mechanics and is an absolute joy with 3 to 5 players.
In 2000, The El Grande Expansions which combines English versions of both of the El Grande expansions released up to that point. Both expansions change the game significantly and may be used independently or together.

Board Game: Twilight Struggle
Board Game: Twilight Struggle

Twilight Struggle (2005) In 1945, unlikely allies toppled Hitler's war machine, while humanity's most devastating weapons forced the Japanese Empire to its knees in a storm of fire. Where once there stood many great powers, there then stood only two. The world had scant months to sigh its collective relief before a new conflict threatened. Unlike the titanic struggles of the preceding decades, this conflict would be waged not primarily by soldiers and tanks, but by spies and politicians, scientists and intellectuals, artists and traitors. Twilight Struggle is a two-player game simulating the forty-five year dance of intrigue, prestige, and occasional flares of warfare between the Soviet Union and the United States.
This is a great introduction game into the card driven world or wargaming in general. The game is fast, well balanced, and intriguing. You really feel like the president of a cold-war era superpower being forced to respond to the actions of your rival superpower all during the game.


Board Game: Eclipse
Board Game: Eclipse

Eclipse (2011) has you in control of a vast interstellar civilization, competing for success with its rivals. You will explore new star systems, research technologies, and build spaceships with which to wage war. There are many potential paths to victory, so you need to plan your strategy according to the strengths and weaknesses of your species, while paying attention to the other civilizations' endeavours.
Board Game: Eclipse: Rise of the Ancients
Board Game: Eclipse: Ship Pack One
Board Game: Eclipse: Shadow of the Rift
Board Game: Eclipse: Second Dawn for the Galaxy

This epic space game is very streamlined, yet the rules and game play are quite intuitive. The asymmetrical powers also feel very different.
The space theme, the research, the clever way the disks and cubes are used to tie actions to costs and planets to resources, makes this a great game. I also like that you don't have to fight (a lot) to win.
In 2012 Eclipse: Rise of the Ancients added Rare Technologies, Developments, Alliances, Ancient Homeworlds and Warp Portals.
In 2013 Eclipse: Ship Pack One added six unique sets of plastic ship models - 108 in total.
In 2015 Eclipse: Shadow of the Rift added Time Distortion, Evolution and Anomalies, as well as several new Rare Technologies, Developments and Discoveries.
Then, in 2020 it was reimplemented as Eclipse: Second Dawn for the Galaxy which was a revised and upgraded version of the 2011 original, with a new graphic design and new miniatures.


Board Game: Spirit Island
Board Game: Spirit Island

Spirit Island (2018) is a complex and thematic cooperative game about defending your island home from colonizing Invaders. Players are different spirits of the land, each with its own unique elemental powers. Every turn, players simultaneously choose which of their power cards to play, paying energy to do so.
At game start, winning requires destroying every last settlement and city on the board - but as you frighten the Invaders more and more, victory becomes easier: they'll run away even if some number of settlements or cities remain. Defeat comes if any spirit is destroyed, if the island is overrun by blight, or if the Invader deck is depleted before achieving victory.
This has got a wealth of interesting powers, has you juggling tech tracks, positioning, and resources, and has turn-based simultaneous play that gives you enough to worry about on your own.
In 2017 Spirit Island: Branch & Claw added two new Spirits and a new adversary as well as adding Events to the Invader Phase of the game.
In 2020 Spirit Island: Jagged Earth added loads of pretty much everything to the game, like 3 new scenarios, 10 new spirits and loads of new cards.
I really should get the expansions (FOMO strikes!)

Board Game: Small World
Board Game: Small World

Small World (2009) by Philippe Keyaerts is a fantasy follow-up to his award-winning Vinci (1999).
Players vie for conquest and control of a world that is simply too small to accommodate them all. Small World is inhabited by a zany cast of characters such as dwarves, wizards, amazons, giants, orcs, and even humans, who use their troops to occupy territory and conquer adjacent lands in order to push the other races off the face of the earth.
There are loads of conflict, is good for 2-5, very pretty, has close finishes, hard decisions, diplomacy, replayability, and a comedy theme - though it can be a bit fiddly.
Since it's release there have been a lot of expansions and mini-expansions - BGG has 19 listed.


Board Game: Memoir '44
Board Game: Memoir '44

Memoir '44 (2006) by Richard Borg is a historical boardgame where players face-off in stylized battles of some of the most famous historic battles of World War II including Omaha Beach, Pegasus Bridge, Operation Cobra and the Ardennes.
Memoir '44 includes over 15 different battle scenarios and features a double-sided hex game board for both beach landings and countryside combat. Each scenario mimics the historical terrain, troop placements and objectives of each army. Commanders deploy troops through Command and Tactic cards, applying the unique skills of his units -- infantry, paratrooper, tank, artillery, and even resistance fighters -- to their greatest strength.
A relatively simple game and intuitive rules, lots of different scenarios (and scenery), nice web support/forums, and interesting involved strategies.
This has also had many expansions created for it, too many to mention here.

Board Game: BattleLore
Board Game: BattleLore

BattleLore (2006) by Richard Borg meshes history and fantasy together - putting players in command of an array of miniature troops on the battlefields of a Medieval Europe Uchronia at the outset of the Hundred Years War.
In this fantastical re-imagining of the Hundred Years War, French and English armies are supplemented with Goblins and Dwarves mercenaries and even some creatures like the Giant Spider and the Earth Elemental! Just as important as the armies you have, though, are the Lore Masters you choose to aid you: Wizards, Clerics, Warriors and Rogues can all aid you with unique powers and spells in ways role-playing gamers will find familiar.
This game has a simple war game theme much like Commands & Colors: Ancients, and Memoir '44, but with the added twist that you collect lore and pay lore to cast spells from lore cards that are obtained along the way.


Board Game: Tigris & Euphrates
Board Game: Tigris & Euphrates

Tigris & Euphrates (1997) Regarded by many as Reiner Knizia's masterpiece, Tigris & Euphrates is set in the ancient fertile crescent with players building civilizations through tile placement. Players are given four different leaders: farming, trading, religion, and government. The leaders are used to collect victory points in these same categories. However, your score at the end of the game is the number of points in your weakest category, which encourages players not to get overly specialized. Conflict arises when civilizations connect on the board, i.e., external conflicts, with only one leader of each type surviving such a conflict. Leaders can also be replaced within a civilization through internal conflicts.
For gamers this game offers challenge and strategy that cannot be fathomed just from the rules set.

Board Game: Dominant Species
Board Game: Dominant Species

Dominant Species (2010) by Chad Jensen is a game that abstractly recreates a tiny portion of ancient history: the ponderous encroachment of an ice age and what that entails for the living creatures trying to adapt to the slowly-changing earth.
Each player will assume the role of one of six major animal classes—mammal, reptile, bird, amphibian, arachnid, or insect. Each begins the game more or less in a state of natural balance in relation to one another. But that won’t last: It is indeed "survival of the fittest".
Through wily action pawn placement, players will strive to become dominant on as many different terrain tiles as possible in order to claim powerful card effects.
A great theme by a good designer. The worker placement mechanism is very cleverly implemented, and the way the timing of the actions work out will make you curse in frustration, or snicker with glee. The fact that the area control features 2 different metrics of resolution going on simultaneously in each area makes ones brain hurt.

Board Game: Troyes
Board Game: Troyes

Troyes (2010) (pronounced "twah"), players recreate four centuries of history of this famous city of the Champagne region of France. Each player manages their segment of the population (represented by a horde of dice) and their hand of cards, which represent the three primary domains of the city: religious, military, and civil. Players can also offer cash to their opponents' populace in order to get a little moonlighting out of them — anything for more fame!
Fantastic worker placement game and one we play regularly. Set with a medieval backdrop, but it all works so well and is so full of delicious little mechanics, like the way dice are used, this is a game everyone should discover.
In 2012 Troyes: The Ladies of Troyes was released that includes twenty-seven new Activity cards and six Event cards to add more variety. Also, a new action allows players to move their guard along the ramparts in order to access one of 16 new activities outside the city.

Board Game: Tapestry
Board Game: Tapestry

Tapestry (2019) by Jamey Stegmaier has you start from nothing and advance on any of the four advancement tracks (science, technology, exploration, and military) to earn progressively better benefits. You can focus on a specific track or take a more balanced approach. You will also improve your income, build your capital city, leverage your asymmetric abilities, earn victory points, and gain tapestry cards that will tell the story of your civilization.
I had pretty much ignored this game since it first appeared, but my friend Caroline Black kept mentioning it in her blog The Dyslexic Gamer so decided to get a copy and I'm glad I did, so thankyou Caroline. I like how the various tracks, tech and tapestry cards, and civilizations can combo together. I've even bought Tapestry: Plans and Ploys I like it so much.

Board Game: Dune
Board Game: Dune

Dune (1979) Set thousands of years in the future, Dune the board game is based on the Frank Herbert novels about an arid planet at the heart of the human space empire's political machinations.
Designed by the creators at Eon of 'Cosmic Encounter fame, some contend that the game can best be described as Cosmic Encounter set within the Dune universe, but the two games bear little in common in the actual mechanisms or goals; they're just both set in space. Like Cosmic Encounter, it is a game that generates player interaction through negotiation and bluffing.
Players each take the role of one of the factions attempting to control Dune. Each faction has special powers that overlook certain rules in the game. Each turn players move about the map attempting to pick up valuable spice while dealing with giant sandworms, deadly storms, and other players' military forces.
This game is great, in fact it can be called a 'classic' boardgame now, I guess. Games can be long but there's almost no down time and no dice.


The next blog in this series coming soon.
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Expansions of . . . Castles of Burgundy

Brian Moore
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Bolton
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Microbadge: Gamer with Non-gamer SpouseMicrobadge: Herculean Board Game CollectorMicrobadge: Gaming since 1969Microbadge: 15 Year Geek VeteranMicrobadge: I play with yellow!
Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy

The game is set in the Burgundy region of High Medieval France. Each player takes on the role of an aristocrat, originally controlling a small princedom. While playing they aim to build settlements and powerful castles, practice trade along the river, exploit silver mines, and use the knowledge of travelers.
The game is about players taking settlement tiles from the game board and placing them into their princedom which is represented by the player board. Every tile has a function that starts when the tile is placed in the princedom. The princedom itself consists of several regions, each of which demands its own type of settlement tile.
This game is #14 in the Alea big box series.

Over the years there have been several expansions and mini-expansions for the base game, as well as two spinoffs - a card game and a dice game.
Also, in 2019 an updated version was released The Castles of Burgundy which includes eight expansions, seven of which were previously released as promotional items and one new to this release.

In this blog we'll take a closer look at the original version and its expansions - and may be useful if you're missing any of them.

Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: 1st Expansion – New Player Boards


The 1st expansion had 4 double-sided player boards, numbered 10a–10h.
These boards were part of the Spielbox magazine issue 05/2011.

Rules:
In the original game, you have to lay all tiles in the princedom next to at least one already laid-out tile. Now, not only do you have to place them as just described, but in addition, the tiles always need to be connected - directly or indirectly (i.e. by the same color) with at least one castle.

In other words: If you add a new tile, it must lie either directly next to a castle - or at least be connected with a castle by the same color (as the tile); a different color is not allowed.
This rule doesn't apply to new castles; they may be added as before.




Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: 2nd Expansion – New Hex Tiles

The 2nd expansion was from the Spiel fair in 2012
This expansion consists of 4 new hexes (Park, Goats, Sequential Order, Worker tiles) that are mixed into the corresponding supplies (black and yellow).
Park (Building/Beige): When a player adds the park to their estate, it can function as any building. For example, sell some goods (warehouse), or take 2 silverlings (bank), etc.
At the end of the game, the park may be additionally used per the corresponding knowledge tiles (16-23), as any single building (even if different than originally declared) for scoring purposes.
Goats (Animal/Light Green): A player adding the goats to their estate counts them as any animal (swine, for example.) If other animal tiles are later added to that pasture, the goats will always count as 2 additional Victory Points, even if as a different animal type than originally scored.
At the end of the game, the goats also count as an additional animal type for knowledge tile 24.
Sequential Order (Yellow): The player who adds this yellow tile to their estate is now always at the top in the sequential order lineup with their playing piece. This is the case whether actively or passively (even if another playing piece would get there and normally be on top.)
Worker Tiles (Yellow): When a player adds this yellow tile to their estate, they can now purchase worker tiles from the general supply at any time. The cost is 1 silverling for 2 tiles.


Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: 3rd Expansion – German Board Game Championship Board 2013


The 3rd Expansion – German Board Game Championship Board 2013 (2013)
The Player Board was created by Stefan Feld exclusively for the regional qualifying round of the German board game championship 2013.

I would treat this as a board for experienced players. If you place your starting castle in the top left or right spots, you have access to small towns and the extra large pasture as well as the mines. If starting the game in the lower half of the board, you have to wait several plays to get to those areas but you do have access to rivers, and the large town. The lower right only has access to the 2 tile yellow area and so this would be the only possible bonus area scored in the first phase of the game.






Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: 4th Expansion – Monastery Boards


The 4th Expansion is a new game board with Monasteries printed next to the play area.
It comes with 4 new boards numbered 13a to 13h (back to back 13a-13e, 13b-13f, 13c-13g, 13d-13h)

The following rules are then added to the basic game play of "The Castles of Burgundy":

As soon as a player creates a direct, straight connection between two monasteries with 5 connecting tiles on his game board, he earns 5 victory points.
The first player to complete all three connections between his monasteries wins an additional bonus of 5, 6, or 7 victory points (for a 2, 3, or 4 player game). The second player to complete all three connections wins 2-4 victory points.
This means that a player can win a maximum of 3x5 + 7 = 22 additional victory points over the course of one game.


Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: 5th Expansion – Pleasure Garden


The 5th Expansion "Der Lustgarten" (Pleasure Garden) consists of 10 six-sided tiles:

- 9 buildings "Pleasure Garden" (beige, 2x with black backs)
- 1 "knowledge" (yellow) 4 VP per "Pleasure Garden"

During game setup the tiles are shuffled in their respective piles. The player who adds a "Pleasure Garden" to his estate, immediately carries out an action with the number of the white die (worker tiles may be used as usual).

The expansion was part of the limited print for the "Stadt Land Spielt"-Event on September 14th 2014 taking place all over Germany.



Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: 6th Expansion – The Cloisters


The 6th Expansion – The Cloisters (2015)
Contained in Brettspiel Adventskalender 2015 for Day 20.

5 Cloister hex tiles.

Each round, place one cloister (in place of a black-backed tile) onto the central black depot. All other rules regarding the black depot remain the same.

As with other black-backed tiles, a cloister can be bought from the central black depot for 2 Silverlings, and is then placed onto an empty storage space in the bottom left-hand corner of the player’s board.

This owned cloister can be placed onto an empty space in the player’s estate that is adjacent to at least one previously placed tile and that matches the number on the player’s die.
The cloister does not have a function after placement, but simply helps complete a region.

Note: The size of a region increases by 1 for each cloister within it. However, a region containing one or more cloisters can never be greater than 8!

So, for Example: A 4-space region with 2 cloisters on it is considered a 6-space region, earning 21 victory points instead of only 10.




Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: 7th Expansion – German Board Game Championship Board 2016


The 7th Expansion – German Board Game Championship Board 2016 (2016)

The Player Board was created by Stefan Feld exclusively for the regional qualifying round of the German board game championship 2016.

You can just use the regular rules for this board.











Board Game: Notre Dame: 10th Anniversary


The 8th Expansion - Trade Routes is a small expansion for The Castles of Burgundy included in the Notre Dame: 10th Anniversary game and possibly available separately.

Each player receives a number of cards depending on the number of players. If there are 2 players, each receives 5 “Trading Routes;” with 3 players, each receives 4; and with 4 players, each receives 3. These cards are placed face up side by side above the player board, forming a trading route.

Whenever players sell their goods (which must still be all the goods of one kind), they do not place those tiles on the corresponding space on their player board, but on their “Trading Routes” cards, filling the display spaces from left to right. If the color of a space matches the color of a tile when it’s placed on a display space, then the player receives immediately the bonus shown on that space.


Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: 9th Expansion – The Team Game

The 9th Expansion – The Team Game (2017)

This was one of 25 expansions contained in Brettspiel Adventskalender 2017.
RULES:
Play in 2-player teams. Team members should sit next to each other. All rules from the original game apply except for the following changes:

Before you Start
The "Give each player..." section from the original rules is changed as follows:
1 double board, consisting of two half boards. (After you have gained some experience with this expansion, feel free to use the more challenging reverse side of the boards.)
1 castle, placed on the dark green center space. (When playing with the advanced board, each team can choose either the dark green 1-hex or the 6-hex.)
3 random goods tiles, placed on the respective shared storage spaces. Tiles of the same color are placed on top of each other.
3 worker tiles (for team A) and 5 worker tiles (for team B) as well as 2 Silverlings for each team. Worker tiles and Silverlings are placed on the respective shared spaces of the board.
In addition, each player chooses a color and receives 2 dice and 2 playing pieces (victory points and turn order) of their chosen color. Those are placed for each player separately. Place the turn order pieces according to the determined turn order. Round 1 is played taking turns (A1, B1, A2, B2), all subsequent rounds are played according tot the turn order track.

How to Play
The game is played using the original rules, except that each player only has two storage spaces available to place their six-sided tiles. To make up for that, they can also use the two shared storage spaces (top center). Both players of a team can use shared assets (workers, goods, silverlings, and up to 2 six-sided tiles) at any time during their turn, but they can't use their team partner's six sided tiles. You can't move the six-sided tiles once they've been placed.

Hints:
Team members can operate on both halves of thei double game board.
Since there is now space for more than 6 ships, the following additional rules apply:
Whenever you place your 7th, 8th...ship, put your turn order piece on top of all other pieces (if any) on the final space of the turn order track.

Scoring
Add up the victory points of the team members. The team with the higher score wins the game. In case of a tie, the team with more vacant spaces in their realm wins.


Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: 10th Expansion – Solo

The 10th Expansion – Solo (2018)
This was from Brettspiel Adventskalender 2018 Promo for day 25.

Castles of Burgundy "Solo" is a mini expansion including 1 double sided board.

All rules of the base game apply, except for the following exceptions and additions:

GAME SETUP
Take one Silverling and 2 worker tiles, plus a starting castle. Place the castle on any castle space on your player board (The A side is better for beginners, the B side for advanced players). Take 3 random goods and put them next to the board. In solo game there is no restriction for the number of different types (= colors) of goods that you can collect.
Choose a color and take both playing pieces and dice of that color, plus the white die. Place one of your pieces on space 0 of the victory point track as a victory point counter and the other piece on the 50 as target marker. Continue setting up the game as usual for a 2-player game (hex tiles, goods, etc.)

PLAYING THE GAME
You are playing 25 rounds. At the beginning of each round, throw all 3 dice:
- First, take the topmost goods tile and place it on the depot indicated by the white die.
- Then remove a hex tile from that depot from the game, starting from the top to bottom (depots 2, 3, 5 and 6) or left to right (depots 1 and 4) respectively. If a depot is empty, remove a hex tile from the next depot in clockwise order etc.

Next, perform your 2 dice actions as usual, with the same effects and victory point gains as in the base game, except for the following restrictions and changes:
- You can only expand to other territories via the rivers.
- Whenever you place a ship, take all goods from a depot of your choice, then immediately remove all other goods from all other depots from the game.

In addition, you now (and only now!) have the option to exchange any 5 of your goods for a single tile from the black depot (the 5 goods tiles are removed from the game). Place that tile face down (i.e. its black side up) on one of your three storage spaces. A "black tile" can be placed on any color space on your board, as long as you follow the base game placement rules. Placing a black tile helps you to complete a region (to gain victory points, a color bonus and for winning the game) but has no other effects.

For example: a "black mine" won't generate Silverlings at the beginning of the phase. A "black ship" gains neither goods nor the option to exchange 5 goods for a "black tile".
- Victory points from a yellow Knowledge tile are added immediately after placing it (instead of at the end of the game).
- You won't gain victory points as color bonus when completing a color. Instead, choose a tile from the black depot and place it directly on the board, with all its effects, following the base game placement rules. If that completes another color, take an additional tile from the black depot (if available), place it on your board, etc.
- Whenever you gain victory points, move your victory point counter that many spaces. In addition you may buy now further victory points. Each victory point costs 1 Silverling.

When your victory point counter reaches the target victory point marker, put it back on space 0 (any remaining victory points are lost), then move the target marker down 5 space (e.g. from 50 to 45, next time to 40 etc).
Immediately after resetting the victory point counter you may carry out a dice action of your choice (just as if you had added a castle to your estate).

END OF THE GAME
You win the game if you manage to occupy all 37 hex spaces of your estate within 25 rounds.

Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: The Card Game
Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: The Card Game

In 2016 the game was reimplemented as The Castles of Burgundy: The Card Game.
The Hundred Years' War is over and the Renaissance is looming. Conditions are perfect for the princes of the Loire Valley to propel their estates to prosperity and prominence. Through strategic trading and building, clever planning, and careful thought in The Castles of Burgundy: The Card Game, players add settlements and castles, practice trade along the river, exploit silver mines, farm livestock, and more.

This game is #1 in the Alea very small box series.


Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: The Dice Game
Board Game: The Castles of Burgundy: The Dice Game

In 2017 the game was again reimplemented as The Castles of Burgundy: The Dice Game.
A "dice" version of The Castles of Burgundy. The famous strategy game now in pure dice!
As influential sovereigns, expand your estates through trade and commerce. Combine the dice to your advantage and find the strategy that will lead you to victory.
Like the original game, the goal is to get the most points, mostly by filling spaces on your board to complete as many color regions as you can. The game comes with 5 dice: one timer die, 2 number dice and 2 color dice. The game is played using a "roll and write" mechanic, where one player rolls the dice, and from the results, each player individually picks one color die, representing a type of hex, and one number die, and uses their chosen combinations to fill in a hex on their individual player board.


Another Expansions blog coming soon.
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