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Too Many Games!!!

My wife and I love to play games together. Join us for the journey!

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My Most Played Games in 2016

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
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Now that 2016 is over, it is time to run the stats. This is so much easier thanks to awesome Board Game Stats app. In 2016 I recorded 798 plays in 251 unique games. That is a lot, I realize. I also know that it is actually down for me. Last year I recorded 90 more plays.

One of the differences between this year and other years is that I did not have a game that I played a ton. Last year for instance I recorded 109 plays in Dice Masters alone. In years before that I put up even bigger numbers in Warhammer: Invasion. Since I did not play one game over and over, my game plays were a bit more spread out. This year there were twenty games that I played at least ten time. There are then thirty games that I played at least five times. I am impressed with the fact that I played 128, nearly half of all the games I played this year, at least twice. Of all those games here are the ones I played the most, in descending order for dramatic effect.

10. Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 (13 plays)

Since this game has a minimum play count of at least twelve to finish it, I was fairly confident that it would make it on to this list. We finished the game all the way back in January. As I have mentioned recently, we enjoyed the experience, and I wonder if Season 2 will make our 2017 most played list?

9. Loopin' Chewie (14 Plays)
At the very end of 2015 we burned out the motor of our Loopin' Louie. Fortunately, this version was still in stores. My daughter is three so there are only a handful of games she can really play in a complete manner. This is one of them, so it became a popular family choice throughout the year.

8. Ticket to Ride (14 Plays)
I record all Ticket to Ride maps as a Ticket to Ride play, so these fourteen plays are a mixture of the base game and Ticket to Ride Map Collection: Volume 5 – United Kingdom & Pennsylvania. Since my wife wants to do a strict 10x10 of Ticket to Ride using different maps there is a very high chance of this being our most played game in 2017.

7. Federation Commander (14 Plays)
It would be a slight disappointment if I my favorite game did not make this list. Too many of these plays were solo plays though. Here's hoping that 2017 can yield a few more instances of captaining a star ship.

6. Warhammer: Invasion (15 Plays)
For most of my time in the gaming hobby, this game has dominated my most played list. After being #1 in 2014 it dropped off completely in 2015. For that reason we included it in our 10x10 list this year. I worked on making some balanced decks that played well against each other, and we recorded several plays trying those decks out.

5. Coup: Rebellion G54 (17 Plays)

I have introduced Coup to several teenagers at the church I am at, and they love it. This led to me playing a lot of Coup in 2015, so this adds some much needed variety to the formula. I really do enjoy how the different roles change up how to approach the game each time. I think each of these 17 different games probably had a different configuration of roles.

4. Penny Arcade: The Game – Gamers vs. Evil (22 Plays)
We have several iOS board games, but for whatever reason this is my wife's go to game. I think with the exception of maybe one or two of these plays, every single one was on the iOS and passing a device back and forth. I think in 2017 this will change. This year when we are out waiting together somewhere, I am fairly certain she will open up Ticket to Ride instead of this.

3. Pokémon Trading Card Game (23 Plays)
I played a couple of times with my wife and a handful of times against online opponents, but the vast majority of these plays are with my son. Playing Pokemon with him was a gaming highlight of 2016. He got a couple of new theme decks for Christmas, and he really wants to venture into deckbuilding so it is possible that Pokemon might be around for 2017 as well.

2. Dice Masters (26 Plays)
One of the things that really fueled all of the plays we recorded last year is that we bought a lot of dice. Each time a new set came out, we played it dozens of times. That happened this year too, but we only bought into two sets. This is our second most played game of the year but all of those plays happened in the first half of the year. I am really looking forward to getting this game back to the table.

1. Codenames (27 Plays)

Codenames just edges out Dicemasters to be my most played game. What is so good about this game is that it works with everyone. I have played this game at game nights, I have played it with teenagers, and I have played it with older non-gamers. Each time I introduce this game it is a hit. I am even surprised that it works decently well with just two players. We have a lot of gaming plans for 2017, but I imagine Codenames will keep making its way to the table.
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Tue Jan 3, 2017 4:27 am
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Play Them All in a Year Rating System

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
Indiana
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In 2017 my wife and I are going to seek to play through all of our games. Well most of our games. Any games that we already have on our trade list are excluded because they already have one foot out the door. Some social games and war games are also out because my wife will not play them. All told this leaves us with 175 games to play in 2017.

As we play these games we will write about them, and we will evaluate these games in five areas. In each area we will both rate the game on a 1 to 10 scale (with no halves). When our scores are all combined this will give each game a score out of a possible 100. We feel that having this broad of a range will help us better determine where we rate games in relation to one another.

Here are the categories we will be evaluating games in:

Mechanisms/Rules: This will evaluate if we find the mechanisms that power a game to be engaging. This area will also consider if the rules make sense in a way that flows well and supports the play of the game as oppose to hinder it.

Theme/Experience: The more that we find the game's thematic integration enjoyable or find the play experience memorable the higher the rating will be in this category.

Replayability: This gauges how much we want to continue to play a game and how much we feel that the game experience holds up to repeated plays.

Pacing and Flow: This may be the hardest category to explain. This area seeks to evaluate the arc of the game. Does the relation to build up, execution, and pay off feel balanced? This area also asks how does the game draw us in. There are some games where the pacing of a turn can feel tedious and there are others where an hour flies by because we are so drawn in.

Fun Factor: The easiest to rate, most important, and most subjective category. Is the game fun?

We are looking forward to this undertaking in 2017, and we are glad you are joining us for the journey.
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Mon Jan 2, 2017 4:04 pm
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End of the Month Recap

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
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December finished out with a decent number of plays. Since my wife and I finished our 10x10, we focused on getting unplayed games played.


Number of Games Reviewed this month: 9
Highest Rated Game This Month: Star Wars: Destiny and P.I. (both 9)
Best New Game to Me: Star Wars: Destiny

State of the Collection
Number of games added: 7
Number of games removed: 0
Number of games in collection: 210
Our Star Wars Destiny pre-order came in December, as did a kickstarter game. We also received a few games as Christmas presents. It is a good thing that we are all set to play through all of our games. This should help identify which games we are ready to part with, because my wife feels we have too many games.
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Mon Jan 2, 2017 3:38 pm
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Colony (One Couple's Review)

sean johnson
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I demoed this game at Gen Con this year, and half way through the demo I was convinced this was a game my wife would really enjoy. The game was all about resource management, dice manipulation, and tableau building. The game really checked all of the right boxes for her. We set out to acquire the game on it's release. So did I settle on the right game?

Game Overview
In this game players are attempting to be the first to reach a point threshold while building up and expanding their colony. At the beginning of the game building cards are laid out. There are some cards available for every game and the rest are random. Each player then receives a supply card, an upgrade card, and a construction card.

On a player's turn they will first take all of their dice out of their warehouse. These dice represent resources, which each number corresponding to a different type of resource. The first thing a player does is scavenge . To do this they take three dice and roll them. From the rolled dice they add one die to their pool. The next player then gets to take one of these dice and add it to their warehouse. If the warehouse is full, then they may discard a die to keep the new one. The third player does the same, and in a four player game the fourth player gets nothing.

Next the active player may use their buildings for actions. Each building can only be used once per turn. At the beginning players will only be able to use their starting buildings. The supply building allows a player to trade in any two dice for one other die facing of their choice. The construction building allows a player to build one of the building cards, or if they do not build get one money. This money can be used on a player's scavenge phase to roll extra dice that only they get. The upgrade building is used to flip a built building to it's upgraded side. The upgraded side is more powerful and it provides more points.

At the end of the player's turn they put dice back into the warehouse and add up newly acquired points.

The buildings that players can build provide a variety of abilities. Most of them though provide temporary dice. On a player's turn these buildings can be used to acquire that die face for the turn. Many of the buildings require having multiples of the same number, so throughout the game players will be getting sets of dice and changing out from set to set. Some of the other buildings can attack other players or provide special ways to score.

Once a player reaches the threshold and all players have had equal turns, the player with the most points wins.

Our Thoughts
As a reminder we rate games on our own 5 point scale. When our scores are added together, it is where we as a couple theoretically rate the game on the BGG 10 point scale.

My Rating: 3.5 (It's OK)
My Thoughts: I enjoy this game but I feel like the pacing is off. The build up works well, until it reaches a tipping point. Once a player has the right combination of stuff they just take off to the end of the game. What makes this problematic is that often the difference can be that one player gets a "2" first and then pulls away. The reason for this is that since the dice are static a player can get the right combination of dice and then just buy the highest point yield buildings each turn. The game does provide a way to stop this, which means messing with each other's dice is really a must. I have not played with four, but I am worried that this means the game has a bit of a gang up on the leader issue.

Her Rating: 4 (like it)
Her Thoughts: I like this game for all of the reasons mentioned. It is a lot of fun to build up a tableau and figure out the optimal way to score the most points each turn. I do wonder if some cards like the time vault are a little too powerful when compared to others.

Verdict
Combined Rating: 7.5
This game is a pretty solid selection for us. We have several tableau building games, and this one is different than any other. However, I am interested to see if this distinguishes itself enough from the crowd to keep making it to the table.
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Sat Dec 31, 2016 1:21 pm
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P.I. (One Couple's Review)

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
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I remember hearing about this game when it came out, and the box cover was certainly interesting. I moved on fairly quickly because reasons. However, this game was part of the Asmodee Holiday Sale and the price was right. I tend to really like deduction games, but my wife is much more iffy on them. When it comes to the kind of games she likes, does this one manage to solve the case?

Game Overview
In this game players play a private investigator trying to solve a case. The board consists of locations. At the beginning of the round crime and suspect tokens are randomly placed at the locations. Each player is also dealt a location, crime, and suspect card. These cards are the crime that another player has to solve.

On a player's turn they can do one of three actions. The first action is to do a general investigation. To do that a player takes one of their five markers and puts it on the board. The opponent holding their mystery will then tell them to place a disc on their marker for each match that is at the space and a cube for each match that is adjacent to that space.

The second possible action is a more specific investigation. There are clue cards that correspond with the crimes, locations, and suspects. Nine of these are always face up. A player may take one of these cards and the opponent will tell them to place a disc on that specific crime/locations/suspect if it is the one they are going after or the opponent will tell them to place a cube if the clue type in question is adjacent to the selected card.

The third possible action is to solve the crime by guessing the crime, location, and suspect. If a player is wrong on any of the categories then they move up on the negative point track. If they are right, then they place their case marker on the score board. The first player to solve the case gets seven points, the second five, and so on. The round continues until everyone has solved their case (in a five player game the last player scores no points).

Everything is reset and a new round begins. This is done a total of three times and the player with the most points is the winner.

Our Thoughts
As a reminder we rate games on our own 5 point scale. When our scores are added together, it is where we as a couple theoretically rate the game on the BGG 10 point scale.

My Rating: 4 (like it)
My Thoughts: As I mentioned in the introduction, I like deduction games. While this game is a bit more pure logic that I might prefer I still find it fun. The biggest plus to these kind of deduction games is that even if I do not win I feel like I accomplished something by solving my mystery. The biggest downside to this game is that through random luck, one player can have a much easier mystery to solve than other players because more than one of their elements happens to be at the same place.

Her Rating: 5 (love it)
Her Thoughts: I have never liked Clue or similar games. This is the most Clue like game that I will play and enjoy. This is like a logic puzzle turned into a game, and I love the challenge of trying to solve it each time.

Verdict
Combined Rating: 9
This game is a hit for us. Martin Wallace is the designer, and we realized that many of his games have resonated well with us. As a couple, he may just be our favorite designer.
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Sat Dec 31, 2016 12:44 pm
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Sola Fide (One Couple's Review)

sean johnson
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In May of this year I played the Protestants in the epic war game Here I Stand. When it was done I commented that I would like a game that just focused on the Catholic vs. Protestant portion of the game, and I would like it with a much shorter play time. Low and behold a few months later at Gen Con Stronghold announces this game. A game about the struggle between the Protestants and Catholics during the reformation with a forty five minute play time. That very quickly rose this up as a must get game for me. So does this game nail it?

Game Overview
In this game one player plays the protestants and the other plays the Catholics. The game begins with players drafting their deck. From a set of faction specific cards, both players will take three cards. They keep one of those three and discard the the other two. Going through the whole faction deck in this fashion will yield a final deck of fifteen cards.

Ten German provinces are put out in a pyramid, with the top three face up. Each province will have two sides: A noble side and a commoner side. On each side their are influence spaces. Some start out Pro-Protestant, others pro-catholic, and the rest are neutral. It is also possible for players to shift the balance of power in the province between noble and commoner.

On a player's turn they will do one of two things. They can either draw a card or play a card. The cards a player can play do a wide variety of thing, but the majority of the cards will add influence to one side or the other or shift which side has dominance of the area. If at any point a player has all the influence of one side filled, and that side is currently the dominant one then they can claim the province.

Some of the cards can place a disputation token, and if that token is present when the province is claimed then the claimer gets an extra point cube. The person who claimed the province also gets to draw one card from a foreign influence deck. These decks will either add cubes, change dominance, remove opponent cubes, or deal with cards. Finally, any face down tiles immediately under the claimed tile get turned face up.

The game ends once the last province is claimed and the player with the most points wins.

Our Thoughts
As a reminder we rate games on our own 5 point scale. When our scores are added together, it is where we as a couple theoretically rate the game on the BGG 10 point scale.

My Rating: 3.5
My Thoughts: I somehow completely missed the fact in the lead up to this game that it is essentially the second coming of Campaign Manager 2008. I liked Campaign Manager, but focusing on drawing cards and playing out of a massive hand was kind of game breaking. This adds the simple rule of a hand limit to stop that. I love the theme of this game, and the historical connection of the cards. This amplified by the fact that the game comes with a book that gives brief descriptions of the historical context for various cards. I am not wild about the foreign influence cards, as they seem to have a real "the rich get richer" effect.

Her Rating: 3.5
Her Thoughts: I liked this game quite a bit up until the end. The game is fun and moves along quickly, but then it tends to bog down fighting over the last tile. It becomes a lot of back and forth that can really drag out. Up until it gets to that point though I really like the card play and interesting decisions this game has.

Combined Rating
Verdict: 7
A couple of weeks before getting this game my wife actually commented that she wished we still had Campaign Manager because she wanted to play it again. That is no longer the case, because this game fits the bill, as an added bonus I find the Reformation theme much more engaging than the 2008 presidential election.
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Sat Dec 31, 2016 4:26 am
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Gaming Goals Past and Present

sean johnson
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It is a bit of an artificial construct, but the beginning of a new year is as good of a time as any to set new goals and state intentions for what to do during the next rotation around the sun.

Last year, I posted some gaming goals. Here is what they were and how well I did:

2016 Gaming Goals:

Assemble a Print and Play Game
Let’s mark this one up as a sort of success. My intention was to make Sharks and Jets, and that did not happen. However, I did print off Digital Mech Warriors , but I have not played it yet. I also spent a good amount of time printing off, cutting and laminating dozens and dozens of Federation Commander ships. I even played with a couple of them- so yes this one is a success!

No Unplayed Games
If it was not for getting new games, then this one would have happened! My wife and I have four unplayed games on our shelf of shame. Two of them we got this month though. We started the year with thirteen games, bought several, and we participated in two math trades. The other two we have to play still are from the Gencon math trade. All things considered, I feel like we did a decent job with this one.

Make Warhammer Invasion Decks

Since Warhammer: Invasion is done with new content, the goal was to make balanced decks that play well together. I did this one. . mostly. I did not get through every faction in the game, but I did get a several decks done. My wife and I play tested them and thought they worked. I did get stuck on the Dark Elves though. They have a big focus on control, and it is hard to feel like it is balanced when a deck is intentionally knee capping the opponent. This can be counteracted by watering the control down so it is less likely to go off, but then it feels like the Dark Elves are getting rolled if they can not get themselves all set up. I did not get through everything, but I got enough to feel good about putting a check mark by this goal.

Make Berserk Decks
This is a self contained CCG style game, that comes with pre-set decks, and some extra cards for customization. In 2014 I traded for a whole second set to make decks, but that did not happen. Big fail. On this one.

Play Imperial Assault Competitively
I wanted to do this one, but it was not in the cards for me this year. A local game store did host an Imperial Assault regional tournament, but it was on Sunday (the one time a week that I absolutely can not make work pretty much ever). At Gencon I did not want to sacrifice a whole day to play in the main FFG tournament, but there were several other event possibilities. However, they all sold out before I could get tickets to them. A game store about an hour away from me does hold a weekly Imperial Assault group. I had a meeting close(ish) to that area on the right day, so I intentionally hung around that area until the time. No one else showed up that night. Maybe next year. . .

2017 Gaming Goals


Play’em All (Again)
I will write a full post explaining the process we are going to use, but in 2017 my wife and I intend to play through every game we own. Back in 2012 we started this blog to document that very process, and we feel like it is time to do it again. We will once again be blogging our experience, and we will be using a different process/rating scale so that it will be different content than what we have done in the past.

Play Imperial Assault (someway and anyway!)
While I would still love to experience a skirmish tournament, I just want to play this game some more. I have had the Return to Hoth set for about a year now. I have used some of the figures in skirmishes, but I have not played the campaign. I really want to do that, but I am not sure how I could possibly get a group together. Maybe the much rumored and desired app will come out, and my wife and I can play together against the app. While I will not list it as a goal, I am really tempted to paint Imperial Assault. My biggest fear is messing up. If I mess up one of the figure packs, it is not a big deal. Re-buying the figure for $10 will be annoying but an acceptable loss. My fear is if I mess up one of the characters that come in the big box. I have painted in the past, but nothing to the detail level of Imperial Assault.

Finish Mythos Tales

In my last post I mentioned that this is one of my favorite games of 2016, and I do not want it to linger on a shelf mostly unplayed this year. Even if I have to brave the madness on my own, I fully intend to get through all of the cases in 2017.

Ticket to Ride 10x10

This is really my wife’s goal, but since I will be who she is playing it with it becomes my goal. She wants to play Ten different Ticket to Ride maps ten times. Her map list looks like this: USA, Europe, Nordic Countries, Switzerland, India, Africa, Asia, United Kingdom, Pennsylvania, and Ticket to Ride: First Journeys. She intends to do most of this on ios devices, so that will be easier. That is still going to be a lot of track to lay though. . .

Play a Miniatures game with my son
This is the hardest goal to complete because it is dependent on him.
When my son was just months old I bought The Games of War: A Treasury of Rules for Battles with Toy Soldiers, Ships and Planesto someday play with him. When he was two I also got a lot of Arcane Legions on the super cheap for the same reason. I think he is at the age where he now find doing this interesting, but I am not sure if he is ready for rules because the toy factor might be too high still. About half way through the year, I intend to start probing to see if he has any interest in this.

My goals track record for 2016 was spotty at best, but here is hoping for a stronger 2017.
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Fri Dec 30, 2016 9:27 pm
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Favorite Games of 2016

sean johnson
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I know that most people have a negative impression of 2016 in general. I get that. In the realm of gaming, I am surprised that the impression is also somewhat dour. Listening to podcasts/videos it seems that a lot of people feel like 2016 was not as good as 2015 and 2014. I am very much in the minority then, because I think this was one of the best years for gaming. I really enjoyed a lot of the 2016 games I played.

I played 39 games release in 2016. This is down a lot from how many new games I played in 2015, but it is in line with most years. For whatever reason I tend to always miss playing on some of the biggest games of the year. This year is no different and I have not yet played Scythe, Terraforming Mars, Mechs vs. Minions, or Inis.

While I really like a lot of games from 2016, there were some not so good ones. The worst game released in 2016 that I have played is The Oregon Trail Card Game. This is a dreadfully dour co-op game that is the opposite of fun, and it is truly impossible at lower player counts.

That game was bad, but these are good. These are the ten games I enjoyed the most from 2016, in descending order for dramatic effect.

10. Captain Sonar
Real time games are a lot of fun, and team games are a lot of fun. This was proven very well by Space Cadet Dice Duel. This game is a complete replacement for that one though. This is a real time submarine combat game that delivers on that theme beautifully. In an eight player game each player takes a different role in teams of four. Each role feels unique and important. This game is extremely tense, and it is immensely satisfying to successfully line up a shot. The biggest issue with this game is it requires a somewhat dedicated quiet area. It also needs to have all the players understand how to play, because if players do not give orders correctly and acknowledge orders correctly confusion can happen quickly. I think this game would be an interesting experience playing with two players and the turn based rules.

9. Merchants & Marauders: Broadsides

What I like about this game is that it is a ship combat game that my wife will actually play. This is because this game removes any kind of tactical maneuvering that naval combat games typically have. It is instead replaced by clever card card play and hand management. What is really impressive is that the game manages to still feel very thematic. The downside to this game is that often it is over before it is over. Ship damage tends to make a ship perform worse, and after a few volleys one of the two ships will have a more clear advantage over the other. While ti is theoretically possible to turn this around, that is usually not what happens.

8. Secret Hitler
I really like hidden role deduction games, and I tend to seek them out. This is one of the better ones. This has a couple of good things going for it. Because of it works it is very possible for two non-fascists to enact fascists policies. This helps create a lot of doubt, but it then works really well because each time a fascist policy gets enacted, the liberals get more abilities. The game works really well, and even more so than games like Resistance or One Night Werewolf, this evokes a strong let’s do it again feel. The theme is a bit problematic for me. I tend to to play this game with high school students in a church setting, and I am not comfortable bringing Hitler into that. The Resistance is still my favorite game of this type, but this is a close second.

7. Islebound
The fact that this game is only #7 shows how strong of a year this was for me. I really enjoy islebound. It is fun to sail around in this game. This is a bit like a 3X game. It is full of exploring, expanding and exploiting. However, it is mostly devoid of exterminating. Players can take ports from each other, but players are not seeking to eliminate one another. I would happily play all of the games on this list, but this one more than the others feels a little underplayed to me. I keep bringing it to game nights, so hopefully it will eventually make the table.

6. City of Spies: Estoril 1942

I recently did a top ten revisiting 2011, and I put Blood Bowl Team Manager as my number one game. I like that style of game. While the game play is radically different, this game has some core similarities. Both games are about using abilities to win tactical battles to build a better team. This game is kind of quirky, it probably will not make many best of list, and will end up being one of those under the radar games. However, I like this one a good deal and it has gone over well when I have introduced it to others.

5. A Study in Emerald (second edition)
The United States release date for this was January 1st so this just counts as 2016 release. In most other years this would be my favorite game of the year. Heck, earlier this year when I made list of favorite games ever i put this at #12, and here it is only my fifth favorite game of the year. Crazy thing since March when I made my favorite games list I have played this more and I like it more. I love the pulpy theme of this game. I really love how this is a game with teams but only a single winner. I really, really love how this uses deck building in a new and fascinating way. This is a marvelous game, but it is not even the best Cthulhu game I have played this year.

4. Mythos Tales

This is the best Cthulhu game I have played this year. This takes the deduction and mystery solving of Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective and improves upon it. The additional rules such as a time limit and item cards really improve the paragraph book system. What makes this game shine is the stories it tells. They are so good, they are pitch perfect on theme, and they are so engaging. Every time I have played this game it has been a thrilling experience and a real joy. There is a good chance that in 2017 I will finish this game and play through all of the cases, and that is the only downside of this great game.

3. Star Wars: Destiny
I could be wrong but I am going to call it now. In the first few days of January 2018 when I am writing my blog post for my most played game of 2017 this is going to be in the #1 spot. This is in part because my wife is also all in on this game. Star Wars Destiny has the same theme as Star Wars Epic Duels, which is what if the Star Wars characters fought each other. It may not be canon, but it is great fun to have Count Dooku and Kylo Ren team up to take on Han Solo and Admiral Ackbar. The rarity structure in this game is terrible, and I am really hoping they tweak it a bit (too many characters are legendary rarity). This is one of our favorite games of 2016 and will be one we are playing a lot in 2017.

2. Millennium Blades
This is such a weird theme for a game, and it plays like absolutely nothing else. However, this game works so well for me. Millennium Blades tries to capture the feel of playing a CCG competitively without actually playing a CCG. It manages to succeed at delivering this concept perfectly. The real time deck building portion of this game manages to capture the excitement of opening up a pack and trying to get that card. While it is simpler, the game also does a great job at getting something that feels like building a deck. There is also so much game in this box. I have played it multiple times and there are so many cards I have not seen yet. The two hour play time makes this is a bit harder to get to the table, but it is always a blast when it gets out.

1. Star Wars: Rebellion

I am a really big Star Wars fan. My Star Wars fan cred is strong, and I can back that up with tons and tons of useless trivia, hours of lost hours to watching Star Wars, and hundreds of Star Wars toys. Given all of that, this is the single best Star Wars game ever made. This game capture the grandeur of Star Wars perfectly, and it so very much fun. For instance the last time I played this Mon Mothma, leader of the rebellion, went to the dark side! Then Admiral Wedge Antilles led a desperate gambit to defeat an Imperial fleet and succeeded! Then Chewbacca led a wooke uprising on Kashyyyk! Perfect, it is all so perfect. I love this game. It is my favorite game of the year and it is one of my favorite games ever.
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Fri Dec 30, 2016 4:02 am
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2011 Five Year Look Back

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
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I was thinking I wanted to do a five year look back post in 2017, and then I realized there was still time to do that for 2011 this year. In 2011 we had not yet started this blog, but this was the year that Game On Game Night got its beginnings. Back then Game On! With Cody and John was still going. The constant plugging on the podcast helped draw in a lot of visitors that first year. As a result of the game night I played a lot more new releases that year than I had up to that point.

At this point I have played a little over eighty games released in 2011. There are a few games from that year that I have yet to play. Most notably are Ora et Laboraand Trajan. 2011 is also the year that we started to hit that too many game threshold. Several of the games we have from 2011 are underplayed with less than 10 plays. In 2009 and 2010 we tended to get less games to the table more often, but in 2011 we transitioned to playing more unique games less often. Now that we are five years removed from 2011, here are the games from that year that I enjoy the most.

10. Penny Arcade: The Game – Gamers vs. Evil

This was part of the big wave that deck builders that came out after Dominion. Like many of those games this tweaked the formula just a bit. This has two currencies like Ascension, a common pool of cards like Dominion, and bosses to fight like DC Deckbuilding game. We have this game and it’s expansion, but we have only gotten the cards out of the box a handful of times. However, we have played it a lot on phones. Whenever we are out and about and want to play a game together this is my wife’s go to game. It is a really by the numbers deck building game, but deckbuilding is fun and this game is fun enough for us to play over and over.

9. Fortune and Glory: The Cliffhanger Game
Back in 2011, $100+ were not as common as they are today. The price tag really scared me away, but this was a game I really wanted. I finally traded for it, and this game lived up to my expectations. A long set up time and fairly lengthy play time keeps this game from getting played as much as I would like it to. However, the game creates a fun pulp story. I am really on board with the kind of games that Flying Frog makes, and this one is no different.

8. A Few Acres of Snow
I know this game is marred because there is a dominant strategy (which I do not know how to execute, so it has not been an issue for me). However, I really enjoy the system. This was the first game to use deckbuilding in a really unique way. I have not played this game as much I would like, but I have enjoyed it every time it makes it out to the table.

7. Discworld: Ankh-Morpork

This is the second Martin Wallace on the list, and this game is also one of our most underplayed games. Both my wife and I like it, so it should get played more. This game has a lot going for it. I love the way the card play works in this game, and every turn has interesting choices. I like that this card interaction is combined with area control, and finally players have their own unique victory condition.

6. The Castles of Burgundy
This is a game that we traded for a couple of years ago, and one of the major reasons for doing so is that I know several people who really like this game. I believe this is the highest rated game from 2011 that I have included on this list. Despite having a color palate that just screams bland, this game is a lot of fun. This game captures that feeling of building something as the player board gets more and more full. This is also the quintessential point salad as it seems everything that is done yields points. The challenge is just squeezing more points out of the game than everyone else.

5. Yomi
I got the complete first edition when it came out. I have played this game quite a bit, but only a handful of plays have been in recent years. That is a shame because I like this game quite a bit and it is a game that benefits from playing a good deal. I know this game has an online client but I have yet to really spend anytime with it for reasons. I think I have tried just about every game that tries to capture a fighting video game in board game form, and I like this one the best (though Exceed might be really close).

4. Ninjato

This is one of the first games I got really excited about after discovering on BGG. In 2010 I learned that the designer is local and I tracked him down at a local con and asked if I could playtest it. The game changed a good deal between then and it’s release but this was a must get game for me in 2011. I really like how this game incorporates push your luck mechanisms. I also think this is one of the most thematic euro games I have played. If my wife picked her favorite game from 2011, I am fairly confident that this would be the winner.

3. King of Tokyo
This is my most played game from 2011. This is a great gateway game that is very accessible to people. It mixes pushing your luck with beating people down in a very engaging way. In 2015 I qualified for King of Tokyo tournament and promptly lost in the first round. This showed me that while this game is accessible, it has a bit more strategic depth than I ever thought possible.

2. Core Worlds
Of all the games on this list this is probably the one I want to play the most right now. I really adore this game and it has been way, way too long since I have played it. The game’s play time is deceptively long which might be one of the reasons why it does not make to the table as much as I want. This is probably my favorite deck building game. I really like the space conquest theme and artwork. I love the progression of this game. It feels like players are making a march to the core worlds. It is so much fun to watch my forces grow and my space empire expand.

1. Blood Bowl: Team Manager – The Card Game

This is my favorite game of 2011. I remember demoing the game at Gen Con that year. I was really liking it, and a FFG person came by and said that there were less than ten copies left. I immediately got up and bought it. I really enjoy the back and forth tactical play of this game. I like that this game gives the synergy of a CCG style game in a much more manageable and accessible game. This is a game that I am always willing to play and it is a great time every time. I am happy that it got two expansions, but I wish they made one more to include some of the good aligned factions like high elves and lizardmen.
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Wed Dec 28, 2016 3:05 am
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Yonmoque (One Couple's Review)

sean johnson
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Edinburgh
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Back in October I somehow ran across the kickstarter campaign for this abstract strategy game. The campaign was mostly to create a deluxe version with a very Japanese look to it. The board and pieces were visually compelling so I looked at the campaign. I was really struck that this was a campaign by one of the little guys, using kickstarter to fund their project as opposed to the bigger companies using it as a pre-order system. I may be wrong but I got he impression the games were hand made. It had few backers and did not exceed the funding goal by a whole lot. I found the whole thing kind of charming honestly and I went ahead and backed at one of the lower levels that gave a version with lower quality pieces. I actually backed for two of these since the price difference was $3. One of the reasons for backing this also is that we do not have much in the way of abstract strategy games. Did Yonmoque convince us we need at least one or did it confirm there is a good reason we lack these kind of games?

Game Overview
Yonmoque is played on a 5x5 grid with an alternating color pattern and five unique squares (the corners and center). The goal of the game is for a player to get four in a row of their color.

On a player's turn they may place a piece or move a piece. To place a piece they simply take one of their unplaced pieces and put it anywhere on the board.

To move a piece a player selects one of their pieces to move. All pieces move like kings in chess (one space in any direction). However, if the piece is on a space matching its color it may move like a bishop in chess (Diagonally multiple spaces).

If at any point a player is able to get an opponent's piece(s) between two of their pieces on a line then the opponent pieces flip to their color.

In order to win a player must get four in a row by using a move action. Placing a piece to create four in a row does not do it. If a player ever gets five in a row of their color, then they lose.

Our Thoughts
As a reminder we rate games on our own 5 point scale. When our scores are added together, it is where we as a couple theoretically rate the game on the BGG 10 point scale.

My Rating: 3 (it's OK)
My Thoughts: This game is in a really good sweet spot. It is fairly easy to grasp, teach, and play. However, this game has some depth and complexity to it. What really makes the game work is how quick it plays. It seems that one mistake in this game is often fatal, but that is OK because the whole experience is less than 10 minutes (and that is if both players are being slow and thoughtful).

Her Rating: 3.5 (it's OK)
Her Thoughts: I liked this game a lot more than I thought I would. it was actually a very pleasant surprise. This game does require a lot of advance planning, but the small board and limited pieces makes that much more manageable. The game plays so quick, that it created a real "let's do that again" feel for me.

Verdict
Combined Rating: 6.5
When the envelope came from Japan my wife was more than a little annoyed that it was a kickstarter game. She was especially annoyed when she saw the components (remember I purposely backed the low end). However, the game play won her over. This is a kickstarter success for us and this feels that abstract strategy niche in our collection.
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Fri Dec 23, 2016 4:35 am
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