Play by Play

To explore, and expand upon my thoughts in our wonderful hobby space; to sometimes exploit (borrow), but never exterminate, others'.

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It Plays: November 13th - November 27th (Pt. 1)

Charlie Krause
United States
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Hello all. For those in the US, I hope you had a great Thanksgiving Holiday. I hope everyone else is doing great as well . I've had a number of plays over the past three weeks, so I think I will split my write up into two parts. I have also done some online board gaming, if anyone is interested in that please let me know and I'd be happy to do a write up for that (I typically don't log online plays unless the game is only available online, am I wrong for doing this? Let me know).

In this edition of It Plays I will be covering a replay of Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition, Ohanami, Dice Forge, and The Shipwreck Arcana. In part two, I will cover The West: Ascendant, Century: Golem Edition, Viticulture Essential Edition, and Underwater Cities.


Board Game: Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition

Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition (Replay)
The Summary:
For those who have not read my previous play of Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition, you can read it here. This match was a four player game with the same two people, plus one's spouse. She is a group regular, but was unable to join for the original play. She, as with everyone I have played this game with, took about ten to fifteen minutes before having that glorious "ah-ha" (I finally understand the point to the game) moment. In my humble opinion, this is one of the best feelings in board gaming! It is always great to see that sense of relief and excitement on a person's face. With four players, the time to completion felt the same as the three player game. I am unsure if it was the same length or longer though.. Both games had teaching, but I still feel this game plays best at higher player counts. It is something my group continues to love. I'm still lukewarm on the game though. I feel like I'm still doing the same engine with some minor variations between plays. I think my biggest issue is that at the end of the game, a player's tableau is full of cards and can be hard to remember specific cards that trigger from turn to turn. It almost feels like an accounting simulator with each production phase in the latter half of the game. I won this game at 41, my opponents I originally played with tied for second at 30, and the newest player got 25. I find the game interesting enough and will be happy to play with my group whenever they request it, but I don't feel it is a game I will naturally pick up. I will say that I'm very happy to have the Kickstarter edition, I think the dual-layered boards are essential!


Board Game: Ohanami

Ohanami
The Preface:
In my quest to diversify my game collection, one area I have found myself lacking in is accessible card games. I am naturally inclined to pick up the more meaty euro games, and tend to neglect the lighter fare. However, in my other quest to include my significant other in the hobby I have tried to identify, and acquire lighter games. I first heard about Ohanami from The Broken Meeple's YouTube channel; it is a game he has raved about recently. It is relatively inexpensive so I picked it up.

The Overview:
This game contains 120 sequentially numbered cards split into 4 different suits, and plays over 3 rounds. This is a card drafting, set collection game where each player starts with a ten card hand, chooses two of the cards that will be reveled simultaneously after everyone has chosen, then passes the remainder to the next player. Reveled cards will be placed in front of you to one of three columns (gardens). Played cards must be played either above or below existing cards (higher or lower numerically), or be discarded if unable to meet that condition. Scoring occurs at the end of each round and is based on the number of cards to each suit you possess. Only one suit scores in the first round, and one suit is added to scoring each subsequent round. The remaining forth suit scores at the end of the game as well using the triangular number system (diagram below). Most points win, of course.
External image


The Experience:
There isn't too much to say other than the experience was great. Ohanami is easy to set up, easy to teach, and easy to play. We played two games of this, one at three players and another at four. I have yet to try it at two players, but I can't imagine it being very different. I don't feel it is often that a game plays well, and within the time limits depicted on the box. A select few in my gaming group are analysis paralysis prone. My biggest gripe would be that scoring at the end can be annoying. Everyone wants to know their score as soon as it is over, and one person is left doing the calculations. I'd say the best way to fix this is to do the multiplication at each round end and jot down that number, instead of just the number of cards in each suit. Then it'll just be addition at game's end. The first game was tight at three players. I was in third with 172, second was 174, and first was 177. The game with 4 players was less close. I topped the charts with 218, but the following scores were close. Second was 170, third was 163, and fourth was 162. I focused mostly on the triangle number scoring suit that game, and it clearly paid off.

The Takeaway:
I think Ohanami might be slightly better at a higher count, BGG says that three players is the ideal group. I think having multiple players forces people to focus on their separate strategies, thus leaving your desired cards more at risk making it a tighter experience (unless people don't go for the triangle numbers ). I could be wrong though. I also think that hate drafting might be necessary with subsequent plays. I don't think I would be able to get that score again with the same group, considering our understanding of the game now. I do worry that after many plays Ohanami might feel too samey. But for now, it is a much loved addition for the group in the quick, filler game category.


Board Game: Dice Forge

Dice Forge
The Preface:
Dice Forge is a game I have played a couple of times since I started gaming with my current group. It is a part of the collection at the house were we play. It is usually picked when the group is unsure of what to play, so there isn't any special backstory to it; well... at least not for me. If anyone has any fond memories, or strong opinions about this game I'd love to hear them!

The Overview:
In Dice Forge, each player has two modifiable d6 which generate resources with each roll. They will garner either money, moon stone, sun stone, victory points, or any combination of the aforementioned. Money can be used to purchase new faces for the dice which, when rolled, will produce greater values of the resources. These faces are limited in quantity though. The sun and moon stones can be used to buy cards from the center market. These cards will provide extra victory points and/or special abilities or upgrades to your personal supplies that could be used each subsequent round. The goal of the game is to produce the most victory points with your dice chucking engine. The game takes place over multiple rounds. Every round each player gets one turn to purchase from the die face market or the center market, and activate any applicable abilities. On every players' turn, each player rolls their dice to produce resources. At the end of the final round, victory points are compared to declare the winner.

The Experience:
The toy factor in this game is fairly fun. It is enjoyable to manipulate your dice and see what happens. The pacing of the game is good too. One is constantly rolling, and hoping for the best outcome. Obviously, much of this game comes down to luck, but some of it can be mitigated through special ability cards, and upgrading dice appropriately. Sometimes I do wish it went a bit longer so I could play out my engine more, but I will say that a winner is typically known by the final round. The final scores were 131, 119, 113, and me with 89.

The Takeaway:
I think Dice Forge still fits the bill of a game to play when the group doesn't really know what to play. So for that, I appreciate it. Like I said, it is fun to try out different strategies and chuck some dice. I don't think it is a game I would add to my personal collection. I am curious to try the game with expansions though. While the toy factor is fun, the take-down is anything but...


Board Game: The Shipwreck Arcana

The Shipwreck Arcana
The Preface:
An old college mate of mine had contacted me a while ago, knowing how much into board games I am, highly recommending The Shipwreck Arcana. Well, recently I was able to visit him and some other friends. While visiting, we were able to get a game of this in. Not really knowing much about it, I was excited to try it out. I was even more exciting being taught a game!

The Overview:
The Shipwreck Arcana is a cooperative, hidden information, deduction game. The components entail a scoring track, a bag of numbers, and a stack of cards. The bag contains three sets of numbers ranging from one to seven, and a number of cards are in play from the stack. These cards in play contain rules and/or hints to provide clues. Each turn a player picks two numbered tiles from a bag. One tile is assigned to one of the cards in play, which provides a clue as to what the other tile could be. If the team can deduce the other tile, the group moves up on the scoring track. If the guess is wrong, the game moves instead. Alternatively, the group can pass to the next player putting that specific puzzle on hold until it is that player's turn again. Cards that are used successfully for the team, are flipped over showing abilities that the group can use only once on future turns. If the players reach the end of the scoring track before the game, the group wins.

The Experience:
I played this game with my college mates at a four player count, which is the ideal count on BGG for The Shipwreck Arcana. It was easy to learn, and get into. Cooperative games aren't something I'm typically used to, and I found this to be a pleasant experience. There was thoughtful discussion between the people on what a specific player might have been thinking when they chose one clue to use over another. The game was fairly easy though, I never felt like the group was in danger of loosing, which is a general issue I have with cooperative experiences. I believe the game can be made harder by moving the game up further on the scoring track, thus giving a group less wrong choices. We won the game, if you didn't already guess.

The Takeaway:
Generally speaking, I'd prefer to lose a cooperative game, or have it be super close; if a game is too easy to win, it doesn't really feel like a game to me. Granted, I think The Shipwreck Arcana provided good, thoughtful discussion that makes a person have to think. At four players, I don't think that the puzzle is too hard though. I think one of the easier ways to fix this would be to lessen the number of skips a group is able to do (an easy fix). If everyone is able to skip, there is more information on the board allowing players to more easily weed out what numbers aren't in the bag. Maybe randomizing what is in the bag to begin with might be good too. The rules/hints cards do have a lifespan on them, and some stick around far less than others (part of this is dependent on what number was played to them). I think that is good for the game, but the abilities that are gained from using cards can be too useful if expending more than one card per turn. So maybe limiting use to one ability per turn as well. Perhaps some of this was addressed within expansions? Or maybe we got some rules wrong? If you have played this before, let me know what your impressions are. All in all, this is a game I'd be interested in revisiting.


I'll try to write, and upload part two within the next few days. I apologize for the delay.

As always I'll be on the lookout for spelling and whatnot, and I'll respond to any comments as soon as I can.

Happy Gaming!

-Charlie
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Mon Nov 29, 2021 4:13 am
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It Plays: October 30th - November 7th

Charlie Krause
United States
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Microbadge: I play with purple!Microbadge: Viticulture fanMicrobadge: I play a Monk!Microbadge: HallertauMicrobadge: I play with red!
The games I will be covering in this edition of It Plays are Conquest of Paradise, Tinners' Trail, and Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition.


This year, my group has been trying to incorporate a new game each time we meet. We were fortunate to get three games to the table we had yet to play together. This is truly a feat for us...


Conquest of Paradise
The Preface:
The elder member of our game group recently turned 60, and has been in the hobby for many years. I recently asked him how many games he has in his collection which, of course, started his journey to catalogue said collection. Upon completion, he shared with me a spreadsheet containing over 900 entries; of which, roughly a third are expansions. In his list I came across Conquest of Paradise. This is a game I saw in passing while looking into Banish the Snakes: a game of St. Patrick in Ireland on GMT Games's P500 (It's still there, check it out ). Both are designed by Kevin McPartland. Of course, playing games from the same designer can be a great way to gauge interest in a persons' other designs, so Conquest of Paradise shot to the top of my want-to-play pile.

The Overview:
Conquest of Paradise is a lighter 4x style game in which players and their Polynesian representations inhabit a starting island. They set out in hulled out canoes in search of new lands to inhabit, build new villages, and grow population for further expansion. Exploration is achieved with a push your luck mechanism by pulling chits from a bag. Each chit contains a number of knots and a representation of either open water or an island. Exploration may keep occurring until five knots are achieved. However, if a player pulls six or more knots, the canoe is lost at sea for the next turn, rendering the player unable to explore. After exploration, transportation and battle sequences happen. Transportation occurs using designated canoes to carry either population or military units across hexes. If there are multiple transportation canoes between hexes, a transportation chain is formed allowing for unrestricted movement among those hexes. Battle is a simple mechanic where the attacker and defender form two lines using their units. One die roll determines each skirmish, and each battle could have multiple skirmishes. Depending on the value of the die, either one of the units from either player could be removed (defeated), or panic (retreat). The next phase is to expend action points. Action points generate population, create villages, or populate military and/or transportation units. The number of action points directly correlates to the number of villages a player possesses. An art and culture card could also be purchased in this phase. These cards can provide additional victory points, be technological enhancements, and/or influence battles. The round is concluded my determining victory points, and in-turn determining the play order for the following round. The first player to cross 25 victory points (with three players) wins the game.

The Experience:
At three players, this was a really fun experience (spoilers, I know...). I had first pick for which island group to start on, and I chose the one furthest away from my opponents. When I first play any 4x style game, I prefer to focus on exploration and learn the mechanics of the game before getting into the thicket of combat. This may have been the worst choice for me though.. My first exploration hex was the Hawaii island group (a rare, and coveted 4 land space tile). The more land available for village expansion, the quicker a player can get their economic (action point) engine going. I thought I had this game in the back, being out in the middle of nowhere and having a 4 island group right next to my home island with many more available hexes to explore. Well, my initial luck was all I had in terms of exploration. The rest of the game many of the hexes I would explore turned into either busts, or open water spaces. There are also exploration chits that "blow you off course" and render your movement to the whim of and opponent. This feature didn't cause many issues though, except for when there were no adjacent unexplored hexes next to my outrigger canoe which caused my sailors to be stranded for the following exploration phase. Desperate to try and find new land to settle, there were multiple turns where I pushed my luck too far and struck out. After finally realizing my foolhardy plan to be an isolationist, I focused my efforts to purchase arts and culture cards, and expand towards my opponents to grab what scraps of land and atolls (half victory point non-land "islands") along the way.

The game ended before I was able to engage in combat to try and conquer someone's island(s) though. I know at this point my play sounds like a horrible experience, but I was truly having a blast. Push your luck mechanisms aren't exactly something I'm typically a fan of, but the implementation of it in Conquest of Paradise was light, and kept the game engaging. The other players became invested in my bad luck by egging me on to keep drawing chits, as I would them. My opponents started on islands that started right next to each other, but they too never entered combat. They had enough island draw to provide sufficient growth for their respective populations. This was likely contributed by the fact I was taking much of the open space tiles from general pool. The final scores for this game were 30, 25, and my score of 22.

The Takeaway:
If luck factor in a game is a turnoff for someone, I don't think this is a game that person should pursue. I thought this was a wonderful romp, though. The gameplay is quick, much quicker than I was expecting. I think if I understood this going into the match, I would have focused a bit less on exploration and more on going for known land. The one way to guarantee action points (aside from established villages) is to not send out the exploration canoe. This would generate an additional action point for the player. It is an action my opponents did sometimes, and something I never chose to do. I do think that if my island tile draw where better, the state of the board would have been completely different. My opponents would have been forced to look elsewhere (outside of their backyard) to expand thus leading to more (any) conflict. However, the skirmishes are determined by dice rolls which are inherently luck based. But once again, the game was relatively short, so I have more tolerability for luck in the game space. This game makes me want to try another of Kevin McPartland's designs soon to be released, Maori: Warriors of the Long White Cloud – Clan Warfare in New Zealand. From my limited understanding, this game focuses less on exploration and more on the other 3xs. (*Note: Both Banish the Snakes: a game of St. Patrick in Ireland and Maori: Warriors of the Long White Cloud – Clan Warfare in New Zealand were co-designed with Jerry Shiles)


Tinners' Trail
The Preface:
Brass: Birmingham is a game most people in the hobby space have heard of, at least in passing. It's a game I have never had the opportunity of playing and have been curious about. When I saw another Martin Wallace game hitting Kickstarter earlier this year, I figured I would jump in. The mechanisms in Tinners' Trail are unique in my collection; that alone justified a potential spot on the shelf. It didn't come straight to the table when it arrived a few months ago, as it goes it goes with some (many) games for me. After learning the original print of Brass: Lancashire is in my friend's collection, we tabled it, thoroughly enjoyed it, and chose to get in a play of Tinners' Trail as soon as possible.

The Overview:
In Tinners' Trail, players take their seed money to auction for copper and tin mines throughout Cornwall. The auction system is similar to that of Power Grid; however, the majority of the auctions are blind. Unless the mine is face-up, or the player that started the auction played an survey card allowing them to sneak a peek, the majority are likely left in the dark. The winner of the auction will spend the two time points required, as well as the auctioned cost. If the person who started the auction played an upgrade card and didn't win the auction, that player will recoup half the auctioned cost rounded up as personal gains. All actions are spent using time points. Each round has a total of ten time points, and there are four rounds in a game. The player who has spent the least actions points and is highest up on the track has the priority turn. Once a player owns a mine, they can spend action points buying from a pool of limited resources to upgrade their lands' mining capabilities, removing water tokens, and potentially increasing the value of their land by adding additional copper and tin. One time point can also be spent to earn £1 selling an iconic Cornish Pasty. Time, and sometimes money, is required to mine the ore cubes. For each cube of water located on the land, the player must spend that many cubes in pound sterling for each cube mined (removed). Once everyone has spent their 10 time units for the turn, or have chosen to pass for the round, whatever has been mined for the round is sold to the market. The sell price for tin and copper is variable from round to round and is determined by die rolls at the start of each round. Tin is a relatively stable and can vary from £4 to £7, while copper varies greatly from £2 to £10. Earned money can then be converted into victory points (the only time this can be done) and is determined on a chart by the player order and round.

The Experience:
In the past couple of weeks I have been able to table Tinners' Trail on two separate occasions. The first game was a three player experience. I thought this was a good player count to learn the game at. The auctions were relatively quick, and the game wasn't too tight of an experience. There was room to breathe so to speak. We had all made both good and bad investments in land throughout the game, but there was a clear winner by the end of the fourth round. My opponents' scores were 208, and 169. I finished the game off with 260 points. I think, on average, this type of economic euro is where my mind is most happy. The puzzle of maximizing turns may seem dull to some, but I thoroughly enjoy it! I'm not typically crazy about auction mechanisms as they tend to plod on, but the ability to use cards for the express reason to gain money made for interesting interplay. A player could use a crucial spot of land that may be hotly contested by some, as a serious cash-grab for themselves. After this first play, I was eager to try it again.

The following week we played again. The three of us plus an additional person. I found this play to be much more challenging. I kept spending big on very poor spots, but managed to eke through and win with 219 points. My opponents had 196, 186, and 161. I focused on what I thought was crucial in my first play which was building adits on adjoining property(to remove water and increase the tin and copper reserves on my mines), removing water any which way to reduce the cost of mining (for the current, or future rounds), and ensure I had cubes to mine throughout the later half of the game. One thing I thought was crucial in the first play that ended up not being so was buying victory points in the first round (when they have the greatest benefit, they reduce in value in later rounds). I decided to not purchase any victory points in the first round to ensure I had money to purchase more land in the later rounds. Obviously, this somehow ended up working in my favor.

The Takeaway:
I thought this game had a great mix of planning, luck, and player interaction throughout. While there is some inherent luck to bidding, especially when one is unable to see what they are bidding for, there are workarounds. Playing a survey card can ensure your ability to see the the inherent value of the mine. While if you loose the bid, you are insured and will gain money. A resource that can be exceedingly tight at times; those £1 pasties can be a godsend. There is also luck in the fluctuating market since it is controlled by die rolls, but everyone is subject to the market. You can push your luck in a sense by holding out on copper until the final round, or until it is £8 or £10 to get the most value. That is a choice a player must make thought, I don't consider that to be fully luck based. I think the best aspect of this game is the time track though. It takes planning around your opponents' actions that much more meaningful. And the more players in the game, the more you have to account for their turns. You may want to take a bunch of small actions, but if you want an important resource, like the adit, you may have to forfeit a third of your round upfront to ensure you claim it. But that will allow your opponents many small actions to take water pumps, miners, or build ships and trains. And if you want to try and buy a mine at auction, you could end up using half a round in no time at all. Perhaps leaving no general resources left by the time it is your turn again. Each play may have the same core puzzle, but the impact each play had was completely different. Tinners' Trail is a true gem, and caused me to purchase a certain other Martin Wallace game... Anyway, I look forward to revisiting this again. Perhaps I will try its solo mode at some point.


Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition
The Preface:
I have never played either Terraforming Mars or Race for the Galaxy. When I saw Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition on Kickstarter, I thought this would be the perfect way to kill two birds with one stone. I know this game caused quite the stir in the community with regards to the way Stronghold Games ran it, but that is not something I wish to discuss in this post. It is old news, and honestly has no effect on my opinion of the game. Before my most recent play, I had played it once at two players with my significant other (who is not in my regular "gaming group"), and multiple times solo. So this was not a new game for me, but a new game for my group.

The Overview:
Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition is a card game played over multiple rounds. Every round each player chooses one of five action cards to play. Those cards decide what action(s) are performed that round. All players will be able to take the top half of each cards' action, but only the player of said card will be able to acquire the bonus printed on the bottom half of the card. The goal is to acquire and play cards to your tableau that enhance your economic engine. The resources derived from an engine (money, heat, and plants) can be expended to enhance the terraformation of... well Mars, of course. The more a player contributes to the global effort, the more victory points that player will receive. Certain cards will also garner a player victory points that will count at end game scoring.

The Experience:
For how simple this game is, there can be quite a lot of decisions to make while playing. Deciding what strategy to go with can be tough (if presented with multiple ones). Also determining which cards to cull can be a thoughtful process, a player will never be able to play each card they desire to. This fact will slow the game down when playing with those who are AP prone, this is a fact. Trying to choose an action card that others wont choose may seem like a tense decision, but I never found it to be. Many times if I were playing an action card, it was to acquire the bonus that came along with it. While it is nice when other players activate a certain action (especially the production action) I found myself mainly wanting to focus on my action, and my bonus. I wasn't typically excited for the action that my opponents chose. The fun in this game is to try and activate solid combos, and the most fun is doing it at discounted, or free, prices through the steel and titanium tracks. The scores in our three player game were 42, me with 36, and 33.

The Takeaway:
While Terraforming Mars: Ares Expedition has enjoyable moments, I found this game to be rather typical and lasted a bit longer than I wanted it to. Going into this game, it feels like it should play in around 40 minutes. In retrospect, 40 minutes isn't long enough to build a proper engine, but I was wanting some aspect of grandeur or accomplishment to come from my engine. This is a problem I often find in basic engine builders. While I don't consider this to be basic, I haven't gotten a good feeling for it being a standout game in the space. Perhaps this is a failure of expectations and not of the game itself. There are so many cards in this game, I wanted to have multiple routes of victory open to me. With each play, though, I find myself making a pretty typical engine. I haven't been able to play using microbes, or animals; or lean in heavy on point generating systems such as Jovian. Yes, I have to actively build those cards to actually play them, but they are not always available. Or when they are, I am already far enough into my engine that changing gears would harm my system. The others in my group enjoyed our play. I did too, don't get me wrong, I just don't think I enjoyed it as much as I was expecting to at the higher player count. And my general feeling wasn't much different in the two player game, or my solo games. I do think that the action card aspect of the game was more interesting in the two player game though. Probably because it is easier to focus on one other player than multiple others. I would be curious to try this again at the higher player counts using some sort of drafting system for our starting cards. That way we can try and focus our starting hand more on setting up a more desirable engine.


So that will conclude the first edition of It Plays. For those that stuck through my lengthy thoughts, I thank you. I'd love to hear anyone else's thoughts, or questions so feel free to comment. I will reply whenever I have the chance.

Any feedback on the format of this blog would be greatly appreciated as well. Would it be best to break it up into a post for each individual game? Are game overviews necessary? Did I use too many embedded links, commas, semicolons? You tell me. I apologize for any spelling/grammar errors. I tend to write a bit here and there at the end of the day. I will try to catch and edit issues as I see them. I can only promise that I may possibly get somewhat better as time goes on.


Happy Gaming.

-Charlie
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Thu Nov 11, 2021 2:43 am
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The Purpose Statement and Introduction

Charlie Krause
United States
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Microbadge: I play with purple!Microbadge: Viticulture fanMicrobadge: I play a Monk!Microbadge: HallertauMicrobadge: I play with red!
The Statement:
To explore, and expand upon my thoughts in our wonderful hobby space; to sometimes exploit (borrow), but never exterminate, others'.


The Background:
Over the past few years, I have found myself delving deeper into this beautiful quagmire that is hobby board gaming. I played many chain store games growing up, and experienced Settlers of Catan while in college. However, my true interest in the board gaming space started in the Fall of 2017.

Four years ago, nearly to the day, I attended an Extra Life event where a charity auction was being held. While there were many games that captured my interest, I had the winning bid for Terra Mystica, a game I knew absolutely nothing about. Two very kind people approached and offered to teach me how to play. I was hooked, and the rest is history.

I have played many games in the four years since that event. Though, it was only this year that I started to log my plays, and track my ratings. It's a New Year's resolution that I have mostly kept. Recently, I noticed that I have crossed the threshold of 100 games rated.

I have reached a point where I want to better understand the aspects I love, and hate about played games. While I haven't done much writing since College, I found that writing is a wonderful way to process thoughts; hence, I began Play by Play.


The Goal:
My goal is to write a periodical summary on the games I have recently played. As my gaming schedule isn't always regular, my write-ups won't be either. I do enjoy thoughtful discussion, especially about games, and welcome comments and/or critiques. I will likely dive into other aspects of our hobby as well. This may include games I've backed, my shelf of shame, or my most anticipated. I would love to have discussion on these threads as well!


Happy Gaming

-Charlie


The Shameless Plug:
For those of you unfamiliar with Extra Life, it is an "online grassroots movement" in which members organize gaming events to raise money for the Children's Miracle Network Hospitals in the United States and Canada. I think it is an organization that deserves more buzz in our space, and would love to see more influential people in our community host their own events.
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Sun Nov 7, 2021 2:04 pm
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