Club Fantasci Board Game Articles

Hello everyone! I am writing board game articles, reviews, interviews and so much more on clubfantasci.wordpress.com. I hope to be able to spread my love for board games to the masses! Please check out our site and share our articles and let me know what you would like to see reviewed or written about. Game on! David

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Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays! Christmas Eve - Sarajevo 12 - 24

David Lowry
United States
Antioch
Tennessee
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We want to wish every single one of you a very Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from everyone at Club Fantasci, FLGS-TV, Live From Music City and The Lowry Agency!






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The Lowry Agency Around The Web

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FLGS-TV Around the Web


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Live From Music City Around The Web

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We have no rights to "Trans-Siberian Orchestra - Christmas Eve - Sarajevo 12 - 24" and this is only a cover performance.



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Thu Dec 21, 2017 1:30 am
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The Difference Between a Review and a Preview... Duh!

David Lowry
United States
Antioch
Tennessee
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Here we go again with me having to write a blog post for all the people on Board Game Geek that can't read the title of an article/blog. It seems that many of you, even as smart as you think you are, can't tell the difference from a review or a preview so please let me clarify for your expert knowledge base.

A review is an article or blog post written from the opinion of the blogger who in this case would be reviewing a board game. He or she may or may not have been sent a game that they are reviewing for the benefit of the general public. Key word there being benefit. That's right. BENEFIT. It means that it is written to help you, the general public, decide on a game for purchase. Now I know many of you think you are better writers, reviewers or what ever you think you are better at (everything,) even though most of the people who make these comments do neither of the aforementioned, but still you find it necessary to tell people how good or bad they do their job based on your expert criteria. Because, well we all know you are paid marketing consultants with tons and tons of success in the business of marketing products and blog writing. A review is meant to be as unbiased as possible and will come with all sorts of writing styles. Some reviews write very long and in depths review and others don't. Why? Because not everyone wants or needs the same type of review for them to make a decision. That means, there is no right or wrong way to write a review, only what the reviewer feels what is best for them and their audience. But then again you already knew that didn't you. Because well, you are an expert.

Previews on the other hand are what reviewers/bloggers do to help PROMOTE an upcoming release of a game. They are NOT reviews, nor do they contain opinions of any kind. They are meant to showcase a new product and highlight certain aspects of the game that the publishers thinks are selling points. Hence they are commercials for a product that most almost all reviewers provide for free to help grow the community. But..... there is always those few brave asshats behind a keyboard that have to make some comment on the fact that it's a flowery piece and it sounds like a commercial.... wait a minute.... hmmmm.... Isn't that the whole purpose? OMG! I think that is the whole purpose! Who would have thought that a marketing tool like a preview would go so far as to talk about the high points of a product and avoid any opinions. The nerve! How completely rude that people would try to market their game as positively as possible. What kind of idiots would do that?

I hope this helps clear up the difference between a REVIEW and a PREVIEW for those of you who are experts in the forums, were confused on this topic or maybe just not very bright. I also hope that you take the time to READ the title of the blog/article before making comments on it so that you know if it is a REVIEW or a PREVIEW. That would make the whole internets thing a whole lot more enjoyable. Yeah, common sense, it's that important.

For those of you who recognize the sarcasm in this blog post, please indulge me this as you know exactly what and whom the type of people this is addressed to. Yes I know we are supposed to just ignore the idiots and trolls, but every now and then, you have to attempt to educate those less fortunate too.

The fact that I even have to write this is completely asinine and insane. Thank you for placating me and listening to my rant.

Game on!



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Tue May 3, 2016 9:33 pm
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The Censorship Of Creativity.... What Is The Cost?

David Lowry
United States
Antioch
Tennessee
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I have been wanting to write this blog for awhile now, well ever since the Days of Wonder issue with Five Tribes. While I know not everyone will agree with me, I hope this at least sparks a healthy debate as to when it becomes okay to start censoring words or images in games. With the hypersensitivity in the world today towards anything that can be construed as offensive, I see this as a very destructive, divisive and completely hypocritical road we have begun a journey on.

Let's put out a few examples:

#1 The word slaves in Five Tribes: I personally, am not sure why this was quite so offensive to some and not to others. What is even more mind-boggling is how the issue was simply resolved by replacing one title of a human sect with another title of a human sect but the mechanics or actions of the humans didn't change one bit. In other words, humans were still being used to function exactly the same and that was somehow okay. What was also disturbing is no one was offended by the use of ivory and the maiming of elephants to get said ivory. Yet, one word, "slave" set off a firestorm like I couldn't believe. The word slave has definite negative connotations to it, yet there is a whole culture of people who identify in their lifestyle as to being a slave so to them it isn't negative. So how is it that we can ban or censor a word that has both good and bad meanings? I know in this case Days of Wonder chose to change the word to appease their fans, but the effect is the same.

2. The Confederate Flag: With a the rage over this flag all the sudden there has been such a knee jerk reaction that America is completely divided over it. Amazon has quit selling games with the confederate flag on it, yet they still sell Nazi flags and games with it on them, Che Guevara flags and tons of other paraphernalia that has extremely negative connotations to it. But not the Confederate flag. Can you say hypocrite to the extreme? I'll also note a recent CNN poll showed that the vast majority of Americans do not see the Confederate Flag as a symbol of hatred. How many board games or wargames have a confederate flag on it? How many have other divisive and controversial icons or memorabilia attached to it? Should we ban them all?

The truth is anything and everything in existence pretty much has a negative connotation to it. We use them in board games all the time. What about American Railroads? Why is that okay to make a board game about a railroad empire when they were built of the backs of Chinese slaves? What about the Pyramids? How come we have game after game that features an empire built completely off of Jewish slaves and yet no one bats an eye? Well then, shouldn't we then ban or censor any images relating to the use of slaves in 7 Wonders, Kemet or a host of others games that feature pyramids, rail roads built in America and World War II games. This list could go on forever. What about games featuring Colosseums that highlight slaves that were used in games to entertain the public and were killed routinely for sport and no reason what so ever? Any other Roman games, I mean look how they conquered half the world and brutally murdered millions of people in doing so. What about Mongol China?

When will it stop? What would be actually left if you try to ban or censor everything that could be construed as offensive?

This completely harkens back to the late 70's - early 80's when very conservative people tried to ban and censor Dungeons & Dragons due to the violent and demonic imagery. There was a mass hysteria about how and what kids could get roped into back then and how they might lose themselves to dark powers or witchcraft and start sacrificing people. Yet some people completely laughed it off and thought it was absolutely ridiculous. To this day, I still see articles about this and people saying how stupid it was, but in reality, it wasn't to those offended by it. They felt just as offended and as strongly about what they were saying as people today who are offended by the word slaves or flags. Why was it not okay to censor Dungeons and Dragons but it is now okay to censor other games? We spent decades fighting censorship in books and movies claiming the right to be creative and tell our stories or sing our songs and nothing was off topic. Yet now.... we are censorship happy to the extreme. The very same side that fought all this just a couple of decades ago. Wow, the hypocrisy is through the roof on this.

Just think about it. If you try to censor everything that could be offensive, you will have zero things left to use to be creative with. How are we encouraging creativity or honest discussion of our past with censorship? When do we stop censoring offensive things? Are we personally gonna start to censor people's snarky sarcastic comments because they are offensive? Or are we gonna claim free speech then? It's great to censor or ban things you don't like until it affects us personally right?

Censoring things, just because of a negative past is a very, very bad thing to do. We fought long and hard against censorship and the right to have free speech in America whether it is offensive or not.

Also, we can't just censor some things due to slavery and not all things due to slavery. That would be hypocritical right? Do you personally own games that have images of empires built on the backs of slaves? If you do and you are part of the group that thinks that word should never be used, you better sell all your games that have ANY iconography, images or references to anything slavery was used to build in the history of the world. Otherwise, we are being hypocritical. Yes, I said it. WE are a hypocrite if we fight to censor or ban some things that are horrible but not other things that are just as horrible whether or not they are to us. To be fair, I think everyone is a hypocrite honestly, it's in our nature, myself included.

Censorship of any kind should never, ever be encouraged or allowed. It simply kills creativity. How would you feel if you created a game and all of a sudden a small ground swell of people started ripping you and your game apart for something in your game that never even occurred to you, but others found it completely insensitive whether it is or not. How does this affect your decision-making going forward? Does it make you gun-shy to continue to create? Does it make you question constantly what you can and can't use due to the backlash of people who may find offense for no reason?

I see all kinds of people who get upset over certain issues but then when I run a poll the vast majority are not offended at all by what the topic was, but the vocal minority make it feel the other way. Do we let them dictate what we can or can't use to create? Or do we not use anything that could be deemed offensive to try to not offend people? I mean we already know that no matter what we do, someone will be offended or not happy with the product. Should that really be the driving force when making decisions with our creativity?

Just look at the social media justice warriors that completely jump all over every movie that comes out today and find 8 million things wrong with it even when it really isn't there. Remember how Maleficent endorsed rape or how Jurassic World is completely sexist? What about the recent E.L. James issues? How people claim she endorsing all this rape and manipulation of another? Well, if all this is true? Why is the best-selling book series of all time if it is so offensive? Do you really think these people are trying to be what these people on the internet claim? Remember, the whole argument that we all used to justify what we wanted to see in a movie or read? Fiction isn't real. Oh, wait... now it is real, or real enough anyway that people are so easily influenced as to actually let these images and words influence our behavior.

How come we aren't back to censoring music then again? How come we haven't banned rap music with all of the violence and the way women are spoken about in many of the songs? The threats to police? Why is this okay and no one is rallying against it? I mean music is the most influential of all media out there according to every study ever done. If these are issues and mediums that truly influence us, why isn't this happening?

Now please understand, I am not advocating to purposely be offensive. Quite the contrary actually. What I am advocating is we not cower to censorship just because someone might be offended. Censorship has and always will kill creativity. That is not acceptable in any form. At least in America, we have the right to free speech for a reason. Some even use it to hurt others, but that is their right to do so as wrong as it may be. Once you advocate censorship on any level, you might not like the final results down the road.

Ask yourself and be completely honest. Do I own ANYTHING that could be construed as hateful or controversial? If we do and we rally against other things, we need to stand by our words and get rid of everything that could be offensive to other people. If we don't, we are being a hypocrite.

Then we need to ask ourselves, what is the true cost of censorship? What does it do to our culture, our entertainment? How does it affect our greatest artists and creators? Is it worth it? What is the true impact censorship brings to us in the long run? When is it going to far? When are we going to learn that censorship on any level is wrong?

Or is it just okay to censor things when WE find offense with something?



Game on!

Originally posted here: http://clubfantasci.com/the-censorship-of-creativity-what-is...

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Thu Jul 16, 2015 7:51 pm
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Kickstarter Press Releases and Free Promotion

David Lowry
United States
Antioch
Tennessee
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Tue Jun 30, 2015 4:30 pm
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The Board Game Messiah Complex

David Lowry
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Antioch
Tennessee
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Last night I logged into Facebook around 11:00 pm to find a newer board game reviewer posting in a couple of groups claiming to start a one man war to cure the cancer in board game journalism. I call this raging phenomenon the “Board Game Messiah Complex. Now, I am all for free speech, people having their opinions and such, but what I am not for is people coming into the community trying to create a division among reviewers or people who support reviewers by claiming that board game reviews are not “honest” if they get paid and that almost none of the reviewers who get paid for their reviews (I am not one) actually give unbiased reviews. What I found most disturbing is this person is a moderator for a review forum on Facebook who in their own words tell others looking for advice on their reviews that “the advice may be harsh but if you are open…etc” and then when I offered advice which was very mild and professional, they deleted all their posts and then blocked me on Facebook. Now I am not the only reviewer that offered him advice or disagreed with him but since I call him out on his BS every now and then I guess I got the shaft lol. Also this person previously claimed he was trying to get his site to make him enough money to not have to work at his day job so I smell a bit of a conflict of interest here.

In a previous blog I addressed this issue to some extent so please let me do so again. So if you will indulge me as someone who has worked in PR for over 20 years let me give my two-cents on this subject in a few talking points.

1. While I applaud and support people who work hard to promote board games, I cringe at people who have to constantly find something wrong to complain about. I don’t know what it is about social media, but people just love to tear others down, leave snarky comments for absolutely no reason and just spread anger to people who try very hard to give and support the board game community and I will immediately stop participating with or promoting those that try to segregate the community with rude, nonfactual, stereo-typing propaganda to get views and try to get viewers on their site. There is very little worse in our community than people who try to make a name for themselves by mudslinging directly or indirectly at other reviewers or by claiming “you’d be surprised at the reviewers I didn’t include in my list because they get paid” type garbage to generate some kind of authority on this topic. If you want to be a “Board Game Messiah” you sure as hell better have been reviewing games for more than a year before you start accusing people and trying to generate some kind of dividing line in the community. If you want to start a discussion of bias in reviews, that is fine, I am all for a civil discourse on that topic. Declaring a war that you are going to win against the board game journalism cancer is sad, pathetic and totally invalidates everything you have done to this point

2. Bias – Everyone is biased period. Reviewers have their favorite types of games, favorite publishers, favorite mechanics etc… This will automatically bias a review. There are many different types of reviews, many different ways to interpret them and every one of them is biased to the reviewers disposition of likes vs. dislikes. There is no way to escape bias period. Secondly, it is extremely dishonest to claim that people will sell their soul and integrity for the extremely small amount of money they get paid in this industry to provide dishonest reviews for pay. I know well over 100 bloggers who get paid to review products and make a living at it. That’s right, they don’t have a “regular” day job.They get paid by companies really, really good money to review product honestly and they don’t face this “bias” BS I keep seeing among board gamers. I was recently approached by a major review site to participate in a discussion about bloggers/reviewers who make $1,500 or more per review as to my insights on this topic. I wish I made $1,500 to review products. That is all I would do all day long. As someone who has sent countless products to other reviewers for review, we never expected a “favorable” review for a paid review or a free one. We know that not everyone will like our product. We know that many will and as long as we have put out a solid product, we have nothing to worry about. Why? We are paying for the impressions that reviewer generates for us. The more our product is seen and is “everywhere” the more we will sell good or bad review period. It’s all about the “buzz,” not the review necessarily. Not only that, we know that the average person reading the review can make up their own mind when checking out a review favorable or not. The general public is smarter than this “Messiah” is giving them credit for.

3. Companies pay for advertising. Reviews are a form of advertising and those reviewers that have spent years, hours, money and built up an audience that is finally worth value monetarily have every right and should be paid for the value they bring. They have a dedicated audience that TRUSTS their opinion, knows their predispositions to board games and appreciates all their hard work to furthering the community. In my business, we get paid by the size of our influence or Rolodex to use on old school term. Companies are in the business of making money, hence they spend money to generate more money. They pay people who can help get the world out about their product. At this point the board game industry for the most part pays almost nothing for advertising compared to most industries because the bloggers do most of the work for free. No one has any reason to complain about anyone getting paid for anything in this industry period. Most of the people who do this still do it for the love of the games and the community. No one is getting rich or compromising their integrity for an extremely small fee for advertising or reviews. Before you go spouting what is acceptable business practice, you better learn how PR works. You only make yourself look like an ass otherwise.

4. Payment – Often I read or hear people say that reviewers shouldn’t get paid for their reviewers or the board game itself is more than enough payment and anything else is nothing but tantamount to bias. There is so much wrong here I don’t even know where to start but I will try so please bear with me here. I will break it down in terms I am used to and that board game community will probably face in the very new future if the popularity continues to increase. My hourly rate is $50 – $150 an hour for my work. If I decide to write a review for a board game and this game takes me more than 40 hours to review how much money did I just lose? Especially since I am using my very large audience across all mediums to promote it for free. This Saturday we spent about $150 on having a board game day at my place to play games so I can review them. I do this once a month, why? Because I work all the time so I don’t get out to all the local game nights. Many other can’t either and to be honest, many people aren’t interested in playing a game I have to review. They have their own they just paid for they want to get to the table. It costs money to review games. I spell it out much better here so please take a look. But essentially, I run social media 24/7 promoting other companies games for $0 dollars on almost all counts. I generate millions of impressions per week on twitter alone let alone all 35 of my social media sites, amazon, BGG etc. If you don’t think that is worth getting paid for then you probably won’t last long in this business. People who work hard to generate an audience, who promote board games, the community and have a good amount of influence most certainly deserve to charge for their services. This is how it has worked in any form of entertainment since day 1. This is only going to get more expensive the more popular board games get and the more we stay in the cult of the new as games have to separate themselves from all the noise. According to what I heard from Essen roughly 7,000 board games came out last year. How do you think companies are going to cut through all that white noise? On well-meaning but extremely small pockets of influence from reviewers who review for free?

Whether or not you agree with me is up to you about bias and payment for reviews. Some will, some won’t but I am telling you things are going to change greatly in the coming years or months based on how fast things are moving as things get more mainstream and if you have read my previous blogs, you will see that reviewers already treat Kickstarter and publishers differently then they used just like I said they would. There is just too much coming out, to little professionalism and too much work for no return and no appreciation not only from new game publishers but many of the board game forum asshats who think they know better and can do better (which they never do) with all this experience they don’t have in the industry whether it be crowd-funding, PR, publishing or designing.

As most of you who read my blogs know, I don’t pull any punches. I put it all out on the table, because this is how it really is. I don’t write this blog to blow smoke. To make any money in board games is a very, very challenging thing to do as a publisher. What we don’t need is people in the community trying to create a division and tearing down honest, hard-working individuals who pay their own money, take their own time from their personal obligations and give all they have to promote our wonderful community and board games. This does nothing but hurt a very close, loving and supportive community. What we do need to do is support everyone we can who busts their butt to help make board games a success for these publishers who take the risk, put in the hours, lose sleep and for the reviewers who provide the content and put up with all the BS that comes from posting that content to the internet. It’s a thankless job and no “Board Game Messiah’s” are needed to police it. We are quite capable of handling our own content, business and things we like to read, watch, share and promote from others. We all made it this far in life without getting hit by a train, I am sure we can handle dissecting a review for honest content paid or not.

Now back to our regularly scheduled program….

Game On!

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Tue Jan 20, 2015 5:06 pm
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David Lowry Interviews Jason Koepp of TableTop Gaming News

David Lowry
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Antioch
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In this interview, I have the pleasure of talking with Jason Koepp of TableTop Gaming News about his website and history in gaming. TableTop Gaming News is a must have resource for board game and war gaming news. In this new Golden Age of board gaming, it's important to have resources you can trust and rely on. Come and get to know Jason and more about his awesome site!


DL - What got you into war games as opposed to more traditional board games?

I was first introduced to miniatures war games in 7th grade. My friend and I had played Magic: the Gathering and the Decipher Star Wars card games at a place called The Fantasy Shop (our LGS). They had a demo set up of Warhammer 40k, 2nd edition over on one side of the store. We’d always pass by it on the way to the gaming tables. One day, we stopped and gave it a shot. It all really started from there. We split a starter box (I got the Orks, he got the marines) and that turned into an obsession for the next several decades.

DL - What was the catalyst to start TableTop Gaming News? How long has it been running?

JK - TGN was originally started as a place to collect all the various bits of news happening about gaming and put it in one easy place for people to find. Zac Belado originally started it back in 2009. Back then, there really wasn’t a single place that would post everyone’s news. So TGN was created so that everyone in the gaming would could get their product out there and seen by the people. I took over in 2012 and have done my best to continue in Zac’s tradition of making sure every game company can get their notices out to the gamers of the world.

DL - What are some of your favorite war games? Which do you think should be reprinted?

JK - The minis war games I’ve played the most would be Warhammer 40k, Warmachine, and Bushido. Bushido’s the most-recent one I’ve picked up. I like it because of the skirmish size and the fact that both combatants are involved in melee exchanges (both can take wounds, potentially). So even when it’s not your turn, there’s things for you to be doing. It keeps you engaged in the game much more than a big game of 40k or Warmachine, where you could theoretically go get a cheese sandwich while your opponent plays out their turn (if you trust their dice rolls, anyway).

If one could be reprinted, I’d like to see 3.5 40k come back. It wasn’t a perfect game, but I think it was about as good as 40k was going to get, having played 2nd edition and a few editions since (though only a couple of battles worth of them).

DL - Do you have a favorite series of war games?

JK - With how little time I actually have to play games anymore, it’d be hard to say that there’s any particular game that’s my favorite. But if I had infinite time, I’d like to play more Bushido. It’s the closest thing out there to a “flawless minis skirmish game” that there is, in my opinion. There’s a thing or two about it that I think could be tweaked, but the majority of it is great.

DL - Do you prefer counter based games or miniatures and why?

JK - That’s a good question. There’s a constant tug between liking the aesthetics of a well-done mini, vs. the lower price point of a counter. Recently I did a review of Torn Armor from SoulJar games. They use cut-out cardboard stand-ins for minis (due to a loooong story that won’t be repeated here). After playing the game several times, I found that I wasn’t really missing not having miniatures on the table for the game. Obviously, in something like Mantic’s Mars Attacks, that uses true line of sight, you wouldn’t be able to do that.

This also comes into play with gaming terrain. I actually prefer cut-out pieces of felt for the terrain for my miniatures war games because, even though 3D terrain looks really nice, it can sometimes create situations where a model would be able to end up somewhere, but they can’t physically get there, due to how the terrain is made. This generally happens with things like hills or stairways, or potentially inside buildings with doors and so forth. With felt terrain, you can put your model wherever you need. In the end, for me, a game is a game and should be able to be played. If the board you’re using hinders playing the game, then that’s a bad thing.

DL - Since TableTop Gaming News touches on all kinds of games, what are some other ones that you love to get to the table?

JK - I love Ascension, from Stone Blade Entertainment. It’s my favorite deck-builder style game. I’ve got all the expansions (including the mini-expansions) and get it out whenever I can. I also love a board game called Blokus. Those are the two I play the most (even more than any of the minis war games).

DL - What major changes have you seen in the industry since you started TableTop Gaming News? Where do you see the industry headed?

JK - That’s easy: Kickstarter. I remember when I first started there were maybe 1-2 Kickstarters a month going on, at most. In fact, Ross Thompson, who I worked under at the time on TGN, and I were debating whether we should even really cover them and how. We’d thought about maybe just having a once-per week post about any Kickstarter campaigns that were going on. Obviously, doing something like that now would be impossible. Kickstarter is where the news for gaming happens. The amount of products coming to market through Kickstarter is astounding.

A year or so ago, I thought that the bubble was about to burst and that the days of the multi-million dollar Kickstarters was over. I was obviously incorrect, as we still have them coming through every now and again, and half-million dollar ones aren’t all that uncommon.

I’m glad that Kickstarter has allowed this explosion of products, though. When I started gaming, my choices were “Fantasy or 40k.” Then we got Warmachine (and Confrontation for a brief time). Nowadays, you’ve got dozens of skirmish games and a couple large mass-battle games available as well. If variety is the spice of life, then gaming is getting very well-seasoned right now.

DL - What do you feel are some great tips you can give to people looking to get more views on their content for your site?

JK - Gamers are visual people. The first thing that’s going to draw someone’s attention on TGN is a good photo. Be it a mini, art piece, or photo of game components. Having a good shot that I can use as the Featured Image for your story is what’s going to keep someone from just scrolling on past your story.

Then, once they’ve stopped scrolling, you need to have something for them to read. If you don’t tell me anything to put under your photo, I won’t know what to put there. For a while, I would try and come up with something, but you’d be amazed how often I’d then get a message from a game company saying I’d gotten something wrong and “please change it now!” So I stopped doing that. So now, you’ll just have a photo and nothing under it, which doesn’t really help much.

So yeah, 1) a good photo to get someone to stop scrolling by and 2) something for them to read once they do stop.

DL - Have you ever designed your own games? If so, which ones?

JK - I think just about every gamer’s designed at least one game in their head. I’ve thought up various ones, but none have really reached beyond the “game in my head” status. I have, however, recently started really getting serious about prototyping and playtesting one. It’s a miniatures skirmish game played on a hex grid and card-based instead of dice. I’m not sure it’ll ever be on game store shelves, but it certainly would be nice to see some time.

Check out Jason's interview with me here on TableTop Gaming News: http://www.tabletopgamingnews.com/tgn-interview-david-lowry-...



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Mon Dec 1, 2014 4:42 pm
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Approaching Board Game Review Blogs

David Lowry
United States
Antioch
Tennessee
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Microbadge: Copper Session ReporterMicrobadge: Golden Board Game CollectorMicrobadge: Academy Games fanMicrobadge: 5 Year Geek VeteranMicrobadge: Silver Reviewer
From gallery of Kotzen



It has been coming up over and over again between us board game review blogs about game review policies with special attention to Kickstarter games. With the massive influx of all the new people wanting to launch a Kickstarter project we (meaning just about every reviewer out there) are completely inundated with people wanting us to review their Kickstarter game. So I want to take a moment to break down a few things to talk about from both a professional and a marketing stand point.

1. Review Policies - Always and I do mean always check the reviewers review policies so you know what they offer and what they are willing to review instead of wasting each others time. To do otherwise smacks of laziness and unprofessional ism. I have to deal with this so much with the music industry and it is usually and instant ignore to anyone who can't take the time to read the policy or submit properly, but yet they expect everyone to look at their product with poorly done and rude approach letters or improper submissions. There is just too much demand for our time and for such poor manners and lack of professionalism. Don't be one of them.

Many reviewers are seriously tightening up their Kickstarter policies due to the ridiculous amounts of them launching every week and the fact that most think they can contact us two weeks before the launch for the review. Remember, many of us are booked out months in advance for reviews/previews. If you are in a "rush" due to your lack of planning, plan on paying a "rush" fee as you are now bumping many others who also need the press and also planned ahead better than you. Also don't ask reviewers to review your Kickstarter half way through the campaign, it won't get done on time and honestly, at least for my blog, Kickstarters get the least amount of views of any of the other types of content. It's hard for us to justify any rush to help people out for lack of planning.

2. Prototypes - No, just no. The last prototype that was sent to me arrived with a hole in the envelope and the little itty bitty card board pieces weren't even in a plastic bag to be kept together so I have no idea how many were lost with no list of contents included. That is plain cheap and very poor planning and says volumes about the company to be honest. Secondly, it is very hard for people to get hyped up to review or preview poorly produced prototypes and half of the review is aesthetics, theme and artwork. You can't expect an honest review of half a product. Some people may disagree but I don't care. I have been producing product and reviewing them for way to many years and I know better. I would never accept a bunch of scratch tracks from a musician to review as it would really, really be a very poor representation of their work and the same applies here. Put out solid prototypes and don't be in a rush to get your product to launch. Do it right, or don't do it at all. There are some that will still take prototypes but from what I am reading, it is becoming less and less.

3. Plan ahead - Plan way ahead. If you want a review or preview allow enough time for mailing, learning, reviewing, writing/video and promotion before you launch your Kickstarter or product. If I get a product, like I said it's at least two months before I will review it. Why? Well, there are many, many games that have been sent before yours. It takes a lot of effort to get the games played enough times with different folks to get an honest feel, view of strategies and believe it or not, when we walk into board game nights, not everyone is dying to play your game that no one is ever heard of. We have to wait our turn to bring games to the table so they can play their games they paid hard-earned money for. After, a few weeks of planning play o the game, it takes a day or two to write it, video it, edit it, add pics, links etc.... I have posted in blogs before after all is said and done, it's about a good 40 hours to review your game. That is one week just to get it done spread over weeks due to schedules. Plan ahead and help us do the best job we can to review your game by actually getting enough time to play it properly. Rushing is never a good thing. Also remember, things pop up in peoples lives they have no control over. Bleep happens.

4. Share the wealth - As much as well all love board games, reviewing them and supporting the community, we tend to do most of this for free. Very few are popular enough to make any money at it. What does that mean to you? It means you supporting the blogs, tweeting them, re-tweeting them, following them on Facebook, Google+ and making sure you share their content about your product many times over as well as conversing and supporting them on social media. If they can put all this work into your product, you can support them by helping them grow their audience. Don't be one of those game companies that doesn't follow back, ignores those helping, supporting and purchasing their product by ignoring them or only supporting your "inner circle" of social media. Share the wealth and support those supporting you. It's common courtesy. And please don't tell me how busy you are and it can't be done. I run a business, many other people's businesses and the social media campaigns of several projects at any given time. It can be done and done fairly easily.

I have said it before, and I will say it again. This hobby is growing so fast, things will drastically change in how it's marketed and yes board game publishers will at some point actually have to pay for marketing like every other business genre on the planet. Learn how to do it well, do it right and develop as many good relationships as you can now before it gets to expensive to market your games. People who like you will always want to help you. If you make them feel taken advantage of, forget their help in the future.

Support board gaming, support the community and most importantly support those who support you. It's good for everyone in the both the short and long run. Best of luck in all your future endeavors!

Game on!

This blog was originally posted here: http://clubfantasci.com/approach-board-game-review-blogs/

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Tue Oct 14, 2014 4:09 pm
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A Weekend At LnL Publishing

David Lowry
United States
Antioch
Tennessee
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Board Game Publisher: Lock 'n Load Publishing, LLC.

Last weekend I was visiting LnL Publishing (formerly Locked n' Loaded Publishing) out in Pueblo, Co for a three-day game tour and conference. LnL Publishing is primarily known for the history in war gaming but they are so much more than that and from what I saw, much more to come. The facility was extremely nice as you walk through the front doors with covers of their "Line of Fire" magazine lining one wall and their logo on the other. After a brief tour of offices that are all labeled with popular sci-fi/fantasy themes and art, I was taken straight into a business meeting in a conference room with a gaming table to die for where Chief Operations Officers David Heath fed us breakfast and then led us through a 4 hour presentation on where LnL Publishing was heading and how they were getting there.

What I took away from this was the intense focus on shedding the past and being completely different, trendsetting and leading the charge into new areas of gaming and social transparency with their customer base. LnL Publishing had been plagued by inconsistency with prior ownership and wasn't exactly know for being timely not only with their games coming out on time as promised but also their lack of communication skills with their customer base and extremely poor marketing. Mr. Heath laid out his plans to address all these issues and so many more.

Before my trip out to LnL Publishing, I spent a lot of time digging into the history of the company and the complaints from many of its customers were certainly valid. Although, LnL Publishing had put out some very quality games over the years and yes I have played a few, the lack of quality in counters ranging from misprinting to color shades never being the same from game to game in the same series was developing some serious issues and reliability with the customer base. Obviously, this is never a good thing and it seems that Mr. Heath and company have corralled the issues and found ways to step up the quality control to a whole new level.

LnL Publishing has now purchased their own printing equipment to make their games in-house and oh my what a sight it was. I was drooling with all sorts of business ideas and wishing I had the equipment for my own selfish gain for publishing games. The fact that they have taken the bull by the horns to take as much responsibility for their quality of product as possible says very positive things and is a major step in the right direction for LnL Publishing.

After that meeting we treated to a few demos of some games one being "Heroes Of The Colosseum" by Ed Teixiera of Two Hour WarGames and some upcoming video games that looked extremely good. One was a Space Opera called "Empires of the Dark Galaxy" and a video game based on the popular war game "World at War: Eisenbach Gap." All of these demos were very impressive and seemingly a strong push to new markets and much better visibility, crossover and gameplay. Honestly, the entry into the video game market with their war games could open up a whole new audience of gamers to their products and war games in general.

Heroes Of The Colosseum - Heroes of the Colosseum is a 2-4 player game in which players can create their own gladiators with specialized stats based 3 different attributes, armor and weapons. Players role dice based on their stats for combat on a grid style map and can also create campaigns for their Ludis to compete over a series of games for let's say a season. Multiple Colosseum maps will be included in this campaign as different sized maps will vary the combat styles greatly. More to come on this very exciting game so stay tuned in with LnL Publishing (links are below) to hear more about it.

The evening was closed off by a superbly cooked dinner by Mrs. Heath and her crew of home-made Italian food followed with great discussion and a break out session of some the participants playing Galaxy Trucker till 2 am.

The next morning was met with a host of bagels, danish and coffee to keep our eyes open. We started with a new demo of the "Tank on Tank" video game which is a great entry into the war games genre. The quality of games being developed is quite impressive and extremely exciting for everyone involved. The air was thick with electricity for what is to come from LnL publishing. Following that was a break out session of interviews (soon to come) with the designers and developers before diving back into the demo of the massive space opera miniatures game "Falling Stars." This game was streamlined, high quality and intensely fun. This foray into the miniatures market is a strong step and one I am looking to purchase as soon as it is available. "Falling Stars" was definitely a surprise hit for me as I haven't gotten into miniatures as much.

Falling Stars - Falling stars as you can see in the pictures below is a miniatures space opera game with a large hex map to move their ships upon. Each player or players take a team of ships into combat. Multiple players can play on the same team against each controlling a ship or ships. Combat is card driven base on line-of-site and then dice are rolled for results in attack and defense. Players can scan anomalies in space for black holes, asteroid belts (which give a - to hit or shoot but offer great protection). This game was a lot of fun and produced a ton of table talk in a great way. This is one of my most anticipated releases.

Then we broke for a private tour of the local aviation museum and dinner. We spent about 3 hours at the museum looking at all the amazing aircraft and memorabilia and mumbling about the exciting things to come and the game industry in general. It was at this event that I got to meet a designer for an role-playing game being developed by LnL Publishing further proving the push into other types of gaming and expansion of the vision of LnL Publishing. After the dinner, we went back to the building where another demo of "Falling Stars" happened and Ed Teixeira led some of us in a demo of the original version of "All Things Zombie" based on the "Origins" award-winning miniatures game. We at Club Fantasci had already reviewed this game but not as it was explained to us this time. This was the originally pitched version that was changed before production of the last edition. I must say, this version was a bit more fun although both are good games and even though it looks like a "wargame" with chits and hex maps, it is definitely a board game worth playing by anyone and the energy in which Ed brought to the table just explaining it was infectious which was much-needed as we were all starting to get tired.

All Things Zombie - Even though we did review this and lined it above, I thought I would ad a blurb real quick. All Things Zombie is a campaign based game in which the players choose characters to play which are kind of a super star so to speak with slightly better states. Each scenario has an objective to complete before moving on in the campaign. Be careful as zombies are attracted by line-of-sight and loud noises. Random NPC characters are added to the mix which could be good or bad for the players. There is no a turn counter players use based on each scenario and either you survive and complete your objective or you die. This game is looks like a chit based war game, but it plays much simpler and is a great amount of fun as players compete and sometimes do what it takes to survive, even to each other.

The last morning we met early, I did an interview with a developer about an upcoming game that is yet to be named publicly and then I met with Mr. Heath and Jim Zabeck of Grogheads.com as we discussed more about the direction of LnL Publishing for a couple of hours. I finished the day with a pitch of my own for a friend and his game before being whisked off to the airport for the return trip home with plenty to think about and still overwhelmed with all the excitement of the weekend.

What does all this mean for the future of LnL Publishing? Needless to say I was pleasantly surprised by how much improvement I saw in not only the seriousness about better business practice, quality control and communication with its audience, but also in the direction and focus in which Mr. Heath is leading LnL Publishing to the future. A strong vision was laid out before us that will target a much bigger market and it will take a strong leader to achieve it, but I have faith that behind David Heath and the crew of LnL Publishing, this vision will be achieved sooner rather than later. For those of you familiar with LnL Publishing, I hope you stay with them and continue to support them and share the news, games and achievements. For those not familiar, well, I hope you become a member of the LnL family, open your pervue to new games, genres and support them like you do your other favorite publishers. The sky is the limit for LnL Publishing and there is no sign of them falling anytime soon.

Game on!

To view this blog with picks click here: http://clubfantasci.com/lnl-publishing/

Company Website: http://www.lnlpublishing.com/

Company Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LocknLoadPub

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LnLPub

LnL Publishing on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LnlpublishingGames/posts



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Tue Oct 14, 2014 4:01 pm
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Board Game PR Services.... A Warning

David Lowry
United States
Antioch
Tennessee
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Recently there have a been a few "PR" services to pop up out there to try to help "new" board game publishers get the word out about their board games but I can tell you as an actual real "PR" agency, they really aren't doing their job or very good at it all. Not only is the way they approach it completely wrong, but the material that is sent is horrible, the lack of info is appalling and I actually see absolutely no value in what is being done for these publishers. I am not sure that the people who are offering these services are actually experienced in what they offer or just have absolutely no idea as to what an actual R agency does, how it does it, how it works and why it is even needed.

I am not saying this to bash anyone. It simply is what it is. When people see the "opportunity" due to the huge influx of Kickstarter campaigns, people try everything they can to be a part of the industry. I am sure it is all well-intentioned and I am sure most of them probably could learn to do it eventually but at this moment I am not seeing anything even remotely close to actual PR being done. I hope this changes and quick as people's dreams in this industry just like any other industry are depending on competent, knowledgable people to help them achieve their goals and dreams.

A lot of people seem to think that PR is just twitter, Facebook and a couple of reviews. That is only scratching the surface of what PR truly is. That is the easy stuff, the quick stuff. Effective PR campaigns are well thought out, take months to develop usually and are meticulously planned out. There is no quick way to good PR. If you are interested in PR, then expect to pay for it, expect to have something very creative, far-reaching, effective and a detailed plan encompassing the whole campaign. Anything else simply is not PR. It somebody helping our out a little bit (although that is better than nothing.)

So to all the new publishers out there, please be very, very careful in whom you hire and ask for their actual "PR" experience before taking them on as a representative for your product. You most certainly get what you pay for when it comes to PR and even though no one can make you any promises, they should at least have a long history of actual PR Agency work, lots and lots of connections, the ability to be highly creative with your campaign and a proven track record not to mention a host of other things that absolutely necessary to develop effective, efficient and quality PR campaigns.

I wish everyone success! But success comes through hard work, discipline and a drive that exceeds expectations.

Game on!

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Fri Oct 3, 2014 8:23 pm
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What Some Board Game Stores Don't Seem To Understand

David Lowry
United States
Antioch
Tennessee
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From gallery of Kotzen


I know, I know, not every local board game store is like this so please keep that to yourself unless you want to promote how great your local store is because we all love the board game stores that get it and want to promote them no matter where they are located.

In my personal experience, especially here in the Nashville area and from what I am reading on many forums, this is many people's experience across the country, maybe even the world. Board games stores have simply no idea how to woo in customers. I have heard from at least two store owners here locally that is just isn't worth it to market to board gamers although so much of today's marketing is free or very low-cost compared to what it used to be. I personally read this as ( I am to lazy to actually be creative, work hard and attract customers, especially since Magic the Gathering (MtG) keeps my store open. So why should I bother?)

Well that is a good and fair question except for the fact that you stock and sell board games. You can't expect MtG to be around forever. Everything has its period of success and then struggles for many years just look at D&D. While MtG's run has been impressive and it might be for a while still, it won't be forever. What are you doing to do then? Be unprepared? Just assume something else will be that massive and keep your store open? Let's take a look at some of the issues here.

1. Amazon - This is a big reason or excuse for store owners. Why? Because we can get games for 30 - 40% off on Amazon which we can rarely do at a store. This is a legitimate issue although currently sales at Amazon are very, very low. How do you compete with Amazon? Well you don't have to really. You are selling an experience. Amazon is not. You are supposed to be very knowledgeable about your product. Amazon is not. You are have a store to play games in. Amazon does not. You have excited board gamers to lean on to teach, spread the word and sell your product by word of mouth. Amazon does not. You have the opportunity to get a potential customers hands on the actual product and they can take it home with them right that second. Amazon can not. You have their complete attention and everything if done right is merchandised correctly. Amazon does not.

Do lot's of board gamers buy games on Amazon? Yes of course they do. Why? Budgets. Part of this is understanding your clientele, which oddly enough, most store owners don't from what I can see. Age brackets buy differently from each other. Stores don't seem to understand this. In all reality, I would much rather purchase from my store than not. I am a tactile kind of person and many my age are exactly the same way. We grew up in stores. We didn't have Amazon when we were kids. There was no internet. We like the "experience" of shopping in a game store. The feel of the box in our hands. Being able to see the artwork, read the box and have the excitement of being able to buy and open right there. Yet no store owners I see have the ability to capitalize on this, as it's if they don't get it. They don't have any sales technique at all, and the kids they hire don't even care or have any training either. It's easy to sell MtG. You clients know exactly what they want and tell you. They are excited about it and buy consistently and are very knowledgeable about their purchases.

Many times gamers don't know what they are looking for and/or are looking for recommendations or to find games they have never heard of. I can tell you this. When I go into a local store, when I am looking around, they just stand there and look at me like a deer in head lights or at their computer screen. Unless I ask a question, they pretty much say nothing other than maybe "Hi, let me know if you need anything." Not one bit of effort put into finding out what I am looking for, what I like so they may possibly have recommendations, no paying attention to what games I pull off the shelf to look at for again said recommendations or even asking if there is someone or something special I am looking for such as a birthday or holiday. No comments on what is selling hot currently. Nothing. Nada. Zilch.... It's very sad and depressing.

That is where you come in. You are the "EXPERIENCE." That means you have to sell them on it. You have to have experience in it. You actually have to play the games..... What? I have to play the games? Yes, you have to play the games. Many stores don't have a demo library and don't play the games. Some do read the marketing and try to use that as a selling point which is better than nothing but it would be better to have print outs of popular blogs on games you sell for people to read to help decide their purchases if you aren't going to get knowledgeable about the product you sell. Game store owners and staff have got to learn to sell the experience period. You must be well versed in your product and excited about it to begin with. Having a demo library if used correctly is not only a tool for potential clients to buy games they can try with no risk of not liking it, it is a tool to train your staff on the games you sell. Plus it provides a fun environment in which to work.

This a major fail in most stores. They are woefully under prepared for sales and knowledge of their product unless it's MtG. Business owners it is your job to properly equip our staff to sell, market, learn to merchandise the store appropriately and how to interact with customers. I can't tell you how many times I see teens and sometimes adults working in stores just ignoring people looking for games. They eventually get frustrated with the lack of any type of acknowledgement or product knowledge and just walk out not purchasing anything. This is completely unacceptable in any business.

2. Marketing - Many owners have told me it's just not worth it to market to board gamers. This is a slap in the face to me and all board gamers. First of all, we don't just buy board games, we buy role-playing games, MtG and all sorts of other games as well. So you are missing out on ancillary sales with the very limited and negative attitude. I have to assume that since a board game store owner decided to open a business that SELLS games, they would want to sell as much merchandise as possible and not just get by in sales, so attitudes like this have NO BUSINESS in their store period. Every person is a potential customer, and for every one of us you piss off by staying asinine things like "they just aren't worth it" means we tell all our other board game friends what you think of us, so now not only did you lose any board game sales, but you lost RPG sales, MtG sales, Miniatures sales etc.... You alienate your audience thinking you are a smart business person but many of you have never, ever put a REAL CONCERTED long-term effort into winning a board game crowd. You think posting of Facebook is advertising but yet you still really only cater to the MtG crowd. You are seriously lacking in any marketing experience. You very rarely post consistently and think one or two posts a day is enough or a lot. You don't post board game events, rarely try to put any on and have no idea whatsoever in how to reach your potential audience. You don't put yourself out there to the local community. You actually believe that until they come to you, you aren't going to waste your time, money or effort on reaching out to them. And you plan on staying in business how long?

Demo's - At least locally, they almost non-existent. I know one guy who consistently demo's games for a company he works for but only does it at one store. That isn't his fault though. The stores themselves are not setting up demos. How ridiculous is that? You have a free board game teacher to help sell your product who will come teach your clientele a game for FREE yet, you don't utilize it. You don't contact publishers to help get this rolling. They help promote it, they probably bring at least a couple friends on average, people who may never have been to your store, who may buy something at your store and yet you sit there doing nothing. This is possibly the most under utilized tool out there and it is pathetic. An actual expert on games to use for free and you don't pull them in at all. Astounding to say the least. This is also a great way to train your staff on games you sell, even if no one comes to the demo but your staff. The more knowledge they have, the better job they will do.

Personally, again I said personally, I have never seen a local game owner participate on any of the board game groups on Meetup.com. They rarely participate on Facebook and usually only if they have something to post about a recent arrival but yet never learn to engage people or potential customers. They don't participate in local game nights, they don't participate in the board game conventions. You don't engage on twitter or anything else. You just exist and expect a website, a couple Facebook posts and I guess some people's desire to find a store will bring you customers. Yep, that is a sound marketing strategy if I ever saw one.

Learn to engage your potential audience. Understand all facets of your audience and know they aren't just geeks that play games. Learn to look for new places to market, potential clients to attract, educational opportunities. Clubs, schools, libraries or anything you can tap into to grow your business and the hobby. It only helps you, it never hurts you. Learn to be creative and plan fun events, put twists in them. Capitalize on popular geek days, movie releases or anything for crying out loud. Not one store locally even tries to do a thing for International Table Top Day. Really?

Tell me.... Is this how you gain the customers trust, support or loyalty? You basically do nothing but yet you expect them to spend money in your store and spend more than if they went to amazon and got just as much experience there as they do from you. Do you see where I am going with this? Is this insulting? Yes it is. But it is true. Your basic day-to-day store operations don't count towards this. That is what you have to do to run efficiently. Marketing is a whole other ball of wax entirely.

3. Follow Through - What do I mean? I mean do what you say you are going to do. Don't say you are having a game night and then don't. Don't tell people that you are having a game night and then close early but only announce it on Facebook 20 minutes before it is supposed to start. Don't tell people you are going to stay open late and then close at normal time. One store here is FAMOUS for the last two. Don't ask people to support you, promise you are going to do things, ask them to help and then just don't ever mention it again. You are a business owner, be professional. If you change plans, tell the people involved. If you switch game night, tell the people involved. If you want people to support you, do what you say you are going to do. The hours you post you are open, you better be open. Unless it is an EMERGENCY. You run a business. Don't make people drive 30 miles to come to your store only to find it is closed because you had to help your wife study for a test. Staff your store appropriately period.

Point blank it is not our job to buy from you. It is YOUR job to develop a customer base. That means a prolonged and very serious effort in reaching out, marketing, event planning and giving your potential customer a reason to be there. Give them a reason to buy from you and be loyal to you. It is no ones responsibility but your own. You opened the store, not them. For many of you, it is just plain laziness. For others it is lack of know how. For others still, it's just plain unprofessional-ism.

4. Kickstarter - Some owners feel that Kickstarter has made a difference in their business and they won't carry the games, thinking the game has already reached it's market, but that really isn't true. Why? Because there are so many Kickstarters that the board gamer's can't afford to keep backing every Kickstarter game. This means many will slip through the cracks and they will want to purchase them later. There is business to be done here and if the publisher is offering a good deal to the retail store, you should seriously consider it, especially if no other store in the area carries Kickstarter games. Learn to see the potential and how you can turn it into a positive for your potential customers. Know your customers and in this case, know your competition.

5. Respect Your Board Gamers - What do I mean by this? It means, if you have a board game day, make sure they are the focus no matter how small the group is. The last thing you want to do is push them into some corner or other room so you can make room for more MtG players on the board gamers day. They should have priority no matter what. More than likely, you are having multiple MtG game nights a week. They get more than their fair share. When it is board game time, make them feel special. Focus on them and no one will be offended or made to feel like they aren't important.

The bottom line is that we want to be made to feel welcome in your store and even appreciated. If you are a store owner and you think we aren't worth the effort than you can be sure, we won't feel the need to support your store with our hard earned cash, especially when we can save much more online, not to mention the cost of gas and stretching our already strained budgets. Remember, you aren't the only one thinking about money.

For the board gamers. It is for you to reach out to your local stores and show them interest in board gaming nights, games to buy, general support and excitement. Like one might expect, owning a business is a very difficult job. It is time intensive, money intensive and very often it feels like you are banging your head against a wall and you just can't make anyone happy. Many customers, come into stores, look at prices or games and then get immediately on their smart phone and order it Amazon. Right there in the damn store. That is very, very uncool. Support and praise your local retailer and show a genuine interest in their store. Share their promotions on social media. Help grow their awareness in the local community. Take pride in your local game stores!

If you happen to play games at their store, you sure as hell better be buying games there. At least a few a year, at least. Why? Because they are supporting you. They are giving you an experience, a room for you and others to game in and you know what? That costs them money. Not only did they have pay for the furniture you are sitting own and probably still owe money on, they have to pay insurance the liability of you. It costs electricity, more AC as warm bodies fill the space, cleaning your mess that you don't clean up. Don't even get me started on this especially you young MtG players who leaves your open wrappers everywhere or cards you don't want or food bags. Clean up after you selves. The $2 you spent on cards doesn't pay them to be your maid.

Board gamers should be worried about their local game store. Many are closing due to low sales and you will have no place left game if you don't start supporting in numbers. As much as it is their responsibility as board game store owners to draw in sales, it is your responsibility to the hobby and the board game community to help keep it alive and thriving. If you have budget issues, I would ask you don't sacrifice the board game store for one extra game in your collection. Shop local as much as you can. However, don't give our money to stores that just don't seem to care. It is very much a co-existence. They stores should care about your business at least as much as you care about supporting them and the hobby.

I previously wrote an article called Hobbyists Shouldn't Open Game Stores as well addressing this issue. There is so much more I am not writing due to time and well, I get paid as a consultant so there is that. Make this business a fun one, an engaging one and something you look forward to everyday, not just because it's games you love, but because of the experience you gives makes happy people customers that will pay it back tenfold with word of mouth, sales and social media promotion.

Let me tell you something you all know but don't want to either admit or deal with. This is NOT an overnight thing. This will take a lot of time and a lot of effort, but it should be worth it in the long run if you actually care about your business and your customers. You will not turn you sales around in one month, three months or maybe even six months, but you will turn them around if you are driven, persistent and disciplined. The three things most important to any successful business.

Let us have a call to arms on both sides and bring the hobby to new heights like we have never seen before. That is a win for everyone, stores owners, gamers, publishers, designers, artists.... Everyone.

Game on!



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Fri Sep 12, 2014 4:38 am
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