The Cardboard Hoard: GenCon 2015

Anecdotes, musings, reviews, and other assorted thoughts from a first time GenCon attendee.

Recommend
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Sunday; Or All Good Things Must End

Eric Buscemi
United States
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I woke up fairly early and packed, knowing I had to leave the hotel by 11:30 am to catch my flight out of town. I still wanted to get my wife and my kids souvenirs from the convention, so I had about an hour in the Exhibition Hall to browse and shop if I went over at 10:00 am when it opened.

I started out at the Blue Orange booth, looking for New York 1901. Since it was a gateway style game with depth similar to Ticket to Ride, I thought my wife might enjoy it. But it was not to be, as they had already sold out of that title. However, I found a small-box two-player game by Bruno Cathala called Longhorn in the same booth, and picked that up for her. As it happened, the Blue Orange booth was near a lot of the family games publishers' booths, which I'm sure is not a coincidence, and I quickly found a cooperative children's game called Dinosaur Escape for my two-year-old son at the Peaceable Kingdom booth. I then spotted a cute dexterity game called Toc Toc Woodman at the Mayday Games booth, and really enjoyed a quick demo of the game, so I grabbed the last copy of the game for my five-year-old daughter. I even got a free golden axe promo for the game. On my way out, I saw Tall Card, a Firefly themed game my friend Zach had been looking for the entire convention, and hadn't been able to find. So I picked it up, texted him my success, and my shopping spree was over.

Back at my hotel room, I had to repack to fit four new games in my luggage, and I somehow managed without ruining any of the boxes or leaving anything behind in Indianapolis. A quick taxi ride to the airport later, and a direct flight home seated next to a fellow geek and convention goer named Jessie, and I was back to my normal, boring life.
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Wed Aug 12, 2015 8:58 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Saturday; or Cosplayers, Cosplayers Everywhere

Eric Buscemi
United States
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Another day at GenCon, another early start. I was unwilling to start a second consecutive day without a solid breakfast, so I hit up the buffet at the Omni before heading to my 9:00 am game. While the buffet was hardly exceptional, it did its job of filling me with enough protein and caffeine for the long day ahead.

9:00 am -- Wings of Glory Megagame: Battle of St. Mihiel Salient

I had picked up tickets to this event, run by Northern Virginia Gamers, for two reasons. First, I was curious about the game system, which I had heard was the basis of Star Trek: Attack Wing, Star Wars: X-Wing, and Star Wars: Armada, and second, because like the Giant King of Tokyo game I'd played on Thursday, a sixty-four player megagame was the kind of game I'd only be able to find at a convention. Despite the game being listed as Wings of Glory, the cards and miniatures were labeled Wings of War. Apparently, there are some minor rules differences between the versions, but they were lost on me, a total amateur. I was handed my Wings of War WWI British Sopwith Snipe miniature and the accompanying cards and was sent to battle against the Central Powers. The other pilots around me, both Allied and Central, were all more experienced, and were gracious enough to answer my ignorant questions and provide me the guidance I needed to play. Elsewhere on the giant table, my friends Manny and George were also involved in the dogfight. While the game began to drag a bit when nearing the three-hour mark, I was pleasantly surprised to still be alive and flying at this juncture. It was at this point I foolishly spearheaded a head-on attack into the diminished ranks of Central powers remaining planes, and was shot down straightaway. I left the table with an Ace button and a feeling of success simply for surviving as long as I had. Then, having a few hours to kill, I took the escalator down to the Exhibit Hall to demo some games.

This was precisely when I realized where all the "GenCon is too crowded" comments I had read online came from. The hallways of the main floor, which had been populated but not overcrowded for the first two days of the convention, were now nearly overrun. The number of cosplayers had multiplied exponentially, and their costumes had become bulkier and more elaborate. Fortunately, GenCon had set up a photo friendly area for the cosplayers to congregate and be photographed, so even at its most crowded, I was able to maneuver around the convention mostly unimpeded. The Exhibition Hall was also much more crowded than it was previously, but I was still able to demo multiple games and grab chicken fingers and a drink from the snack bar without too much of a wait.

The two games I demoed in the Exhibition Hall during my break were Superfight and Flick 'Em Up. Superfight involved picking two cards -- in my case "Liger" and "In a Led Box" -- and pitting them in a fight against an opponent's cards -- Zach had "Soccer Mom" and "Flying a Helicopter" -- with the help of other modifying cards, and then being judged by the other participants in the game. I could not come up with any reason why a liger in a led box could be a threat to anyone, but I also could also not see why a soccer mom, even flying a helicopter, would be a threat to such a well protected liger. I was stymied about my cards, but not about my feelings for the game. This storytelling style game didn't work for me, but at least I learned I didn't like it in less than five minutes and at no cost to me. We then passed a ten-player giant-size demo for Flick 'Em Up that we were able to join. Now I am not a big fan of "flicking" as a mechanic -- I don't like Rampage/Terror In Meeple City at all -- so I figured this would be easy for me to dismiss. Wrong. Whereas Rampage over-complicated a lot of things, with multiple different dexterity mechanics, power and superpower cards, player screens, etc., this was a simple western shoot 'em up, and I loved it. Since I am sure my kids will love it also, I am almost definitely going to buy it when it comes back in stock online (it was already sold out on the Saturday of GenCon, selling at $70 a copy). These two above experiences show the value -- whether or not you wind up enjoying the games -- of demoing all kinds of games.

4:00 pm -- Wizard Dodgeball

I backed a Kickstarter earlier this year that sounded really interesting but didn't fund. Leading up to GenCon, the creator sent out a message saying he would be demoing the game at GenCon, and I couldn't pass up the chance to try it out. So at 4:00 pm on Saturday I was in Hall E sitting across from Manny, and in less than ten minutes, Peter Newland had explained Wizard Dodgeball well enough that we were chucking magic dodgeballs back and forth at one another. Within 30 minutes, Manny had finished pounding me into submission by a score of 5-2, due to an uncanny ability to roll pairs when it counted. Losing did nothing to dissuade my interest in this game, and I am waiting hopefully as Newland looks into doing print-on-demand options for the game.

While we waited for 5:00 pm, I showed Manny how to play Star Realms at the White Wizard demo area, on their fancy Star Realms play mats. Manny beat me at that as well, despite the fact I was teaching it to him. Him besting me was becoming a running theme of the Con.

5:00 pm -- Dreadball: Learn & Play

I feel bad for the guy who ran this event. He was a Mantic Games Pathfinder -- Mantic's term for a volunteer that demos games for them -- and it seemed he was not given all the supplies he needed for this event. He had two half sets of players, one painted and one not painted, and didn't have any of the balls or markers he needed to set up the board properly. He managed by using tokens from an unrelated game, but his stress was evident when I asked how similar this game was to Blood Bowl, the famous out-of-print fantasy sports game, and his reply was a terse "they are both sports games" followed by a long, awkward silence. Sorry for asking, but I assumed a lot of people got into this game because they couldn't get their hands on Blood Bowl. Anyway, after a good amount of explaining, and seeing a rule book the size of an RPG manual referenced more than once, Zach and I finally got to play a few rounds of an Orcs vs. Humans game. While it was fun, and not as fiddly as I feared, I can't see it being worth it for me to invest the time and energy into really learning this game, collecting multiple teams of miniatures, and then painting them all.

Heading out of the convention center, I saw a text from Foley that he and some other friends were headed to the Irish pub down the block, so when Zach and I found the Tilted Kilt, we figured we were at the right place. Only after we had ordered drinks did we learn that 1) they were at a different Irish pub, and 2) the Tilted Kilt was actually a chain restaurant similar to a Hooters. Oops. Returning with our drinks, our scantily tartan-clad waitress sat and took our order of nachos and two burgers. A few moments later, she returned with our nachos, sitting again to chat with us. And then things got weird, because she didn't get up. She sat, barely dressed, chatting to us about topics varying from the convention to her distaste for cilantro, while Zach and I ate our nachos. Another waitress brought our burgers while ours continued to sit with us. For thirty minutes. Straight. While this may sound sexy or erotic, it was actually one of the most awkward meals I have ever eaten in my life. We inhaled our burgers and fled to the other Irish bar to join our friends and have a drink without an unwanted audience.

On Friday, Zach and I had met a guy named Josh while playing New York 1901. He had mentioned that his friend would be playtesting his giant robot fighting game on Saturday at 8:00 pm, and invited us to join him to try it out. So after a brief stop back at the hotel room, Zach, Brad, and I headed to the First Exposure Playtest Hall to playtest Alex Cheng's Giga-Robo. Having never been to the First Exposure area before, my expectations were really low. I thought we would be playing an early prototype mocked-up on oaktag with a sharpie marker, with pieces cannibalized from other games. Was I ever wrong. The prototype copy we played, while handmade, looked ready for a print run, its art completed and design finalized. More impressively was how far along the rules were. This was late-beta test to iron out balancing issues and ensure rules clarity, well past what I incorrectly assumed we would be tasked with. The game was a blast to play, I only wished I was able to finish my game before the allotted two-hour playtest ended. Alex, however, offered to ship me a prototype copy to beta test further, which I am looking forward to receiving in the coming weeks.

10:25 pm -- Into the Underdark (puzzle-oriented)

The final event I had lined up for GenCon was one of the hardest tickets to get, and hence why Zach, Manny and I were headed to Hall A at such a late hour. I'd heard about True Dungeon years earlier, and it was one of the original reasons I wanted to go to GenCon. At this point, I'm much more interested in the gaming aspect of the Con, but it remained high on the list of things I felt I had to experience while at GenCon. I had become a bit apprehensive after reading some nightmare stories of experienced True Dungeon goers with tons of "pay-to-play" tokens ruining it for first timers, but my experience couldn't have been more different. As soon as I walked in, our party's Wizard, who had tons of tokens and experience, helped me set up my character, answered a number of my questions, and lent me weapon and armor tokens so I would be better equipped for the dungeon ahead. My experiences with everyone else in our adventuring party were just as positive. Without spoiling the actual dungeon-crawling experience too much, I enjoyed the puzzles, despite embarrassing myself by forgetting how to spell "eighth" during one puzzle, and not being able to hear the clues in the mushroom room at all. The shuffle board-style combat was also goofy fun, if a bit abstract. Sadly, we ran out of time during the puzzle in the final room of the dungeon, and all perished so close to victory.

The sheer volume of everything I had been doing since Wednesday was wearing on me, and I retreated to my hotel room directly after True Dungeon. Zach, Manny and I tried getting in a game of Redshirts, which Zach had bought earlier in the day, in the hotel room, but we gave up shortly after unboxing it and crashed.
Twitter Facebook
8 Comments
Tue Aug 11, 2015 7:59 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Friday; or I Can Totally Game for 18 Hours Straight

Eric Buscemi
United States
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There were some doubts from my harder-partying group of friends whether Manny, Zach and I would make it to our 8:00 am Pathfinder game. But on 6+ hours of sleep, and with a cup of coffee and a granola bar in hand, I had no trouble navigating to the Sagamore Ballroom, the mecca of all things Pathfinder.

8:00 am -- We Be Goblins TOO

This was my first time playing the Pathfinder system, and I made mention of it as soon as I sat down, just to set expectations and head off any issues. The GM asked if I had ever played D&D, to which I nodded. "3.5 is the last version I played, maybe ten years ago." Broad smiles crossed the faces of a few other players and the GM. "You'll like this. Just imagine it as a streamlined version of 3.5." And with that comment, and a pre-generated goblin rogue named Chuffy Lickwound, we were off. Four hours later, after becoming clan chieftain and helping to kill an Owlbear, we had victoriously concluded our quest. The consensus on Pathfinder was accurate, the system was a streamlined version of D&D 3.5, and I enjoyed it. My only issue was with one of the three players I didn't arrive with, who was too busy min-maxing his every action to bother role playing what his character would or should do in any given situation. But I didn't let him get to me, and even stopped Manny from trying to kill his character in game (which I think Manny may still be bitter about).

Afterward, I wandered around the Exhibit Hall for a bit. Finding the Upper Deck line to be much shorter than the previous day, I grabbed a copy of Legendary: Secret Wars, which came with four alternate art promos, in less than ten minutes. Having now crossed off both of my pre-GenCon wish list games, I celebrated by grabbing lunch. I wandered over to Steak N Shake and got a burger to go, and brought it back to Hall D where I chowed down while waiting for the 1:00 pm event I would be running.

1:00 pm -- Main Event: A Card Game Battle Royale

One of the reasons I finally made the pilgrimage to GenCon this year was to support my friend Zach, who created, Kickstarted, and published his game, Main Event, over the last eighteen months. While he ran a five-player game of Main Event for a group who had bought tickets for it, including a game reviewer, I ran a second parallel game with our friends and friends-of-friends, to 1) give our extended circle of friends a chance to play the game, and 2) to double the exposure of Zach's game in the space GenCon allotted him. Despite some initial issues getting the table space, his game session went well, with everyone enjoying the take-that aspect of the royal rumble wrestling game.

From there, Zach, Manny and I walked over to St. Elmo Steak House, having been advised by multiple people that this was the best place to eat in Indianapolis. We were also told we had to try the shrimp cocktail. I won't lie, when I hear that shrimp is the most buzzed about protein at a steakhouse, I get a bit nervous. But we sat down at the bar and got two orders of the shrimp cocktail, and we were not disappointed. The cocktail sauce was not the normally over-sugared ketchup that I hate, but a fiery horseradish sauce that cleared my sinuses. And not to worry, their steak -- I got the prime rib -- was also excellent. I'd highly recommend this to anyone heading to Indy, as long as budget is not a concern.

5:00 pm -- Brewin' USA

Full of meat and happiness, I lumbered over to Hall E to play another game I had Kickstarted, Brewin' USA. Like with Bottom of the Ninth -- another Kickstarter game I backed and demoed at GenCon -- I wanted to 1) learn the game by playing it rather than from reading rules, and 2) make sure I actually liked the game, otherwise, I'd trade or resell it without opening it. I played a four-player game which the game's creator, Adam Rehberg, oversaw, and won, getting to be the Brewin' USA Brewmaster for the night. More importantly, I loved the game, which I admit could be confirmation bias as a backer of the game, but I really doubt it, as it stands out as my favorite game played at GenCon as I write this a week later.

Heading out, I passed the New York 1901 play area for what must have been the tenth time, and curiosity finally won me over. Zach and I sat down to give it a play, and were joined by a guy from Chicago named Josh. At that time, unbeknownst to us, they were setting up a tournament for the game and were short one table of players, so our free play became a tournament play with the winner having a chance to move on to the final game and a chance to win a free copy of the game. Well I did win the first round, but was outmaneuvered handily in the final and came in tied for last place. But I did enjoy New York 1901, a gateway city-building game, more than I thought I would. Also of note, Josh chatted with us about his friend who was demoing a game called Giga-Robo in the First Exposure Playtest Hall, and we agreed to give that a play the following day.

I wandered around a bit after losing the final round of the New York 1901 tournament, waiting for Zach to finish playing Cutthroat Caverns, an experience he hated so much I am glad I didn't sign up with him. I headed over to the White Wizard area, seeing if anyone was interested in a game of Star Realms, but instead wandered into an Epic Card Game tournament. I asked the guy running the tournament if it was available to demo, and he sat down with me on the spot and ran me through a game. Within three rounds, he had totally annihilated me with Thundarus, an unbanishable flying dragon with 15 attack points. I still can't figure out if he really was trying to interest me in the game, or if he sat me down for the sole purpose of humiliating me. Either way, the game was a decent, non-collectible Magic: The Gathering knock-off, but one has to wonder how much replayability it will have with only 120 cards in the box.

10:00 pm -- Anime Game Shows for Adults!

From there, I rejoined Zach, Manny, Foley, Melissa, George and the rest of their crew at the Anime Game Shows for Adults, which was just not my speed. In fitting with the inclusive nature of GenCon, I don't want to rag on this too much, but I also can't help wonder how anyone who has seen actual naked people would find cartoon images of naked people so titillating, or the word "thundercunt," for that matter. Zach, Manny and I immediately left and headed back to do some more gaming.

We stumbled onto Gruff, which for the cost of two generic tickets, we demoed with its creator, Brent Critchfield. He was clearly struggling this late in the day, his voice long gone, but his enthusiasm still present. His game was similar to Epic Card Game in being a player vs. player minion combat game, but I saw more unique elements in this game than the prior. I also really liked the idea of the little plastic clip markers that denoted the stats of the cards. However, the explanation we got from Brent still left too much unexplained, and as Zach and I were also fading fast, we didn't finish the game. This I will chalk up to Con fatigue more than any failure on the game's part, and I would like to give this one another shot when fresh.

On a recommendation from the hotel's bartender, we headed to the Slippery Noodle, a Blues bar with live music, for a night cap. However, our walk over directly coincided with the exodus of a One Direction concert at Lucas Oil Stadium, which led to a comical clash of cultures as the stream of GenCon goers crossed with the teens and soccer moms exiting the boy band concert. We got a spot at the bar big enough to play Pairs on, and I proceeded to lose both games, proving that I was clearly too mentally exhausted to even manage the feat of counting properly. So, after a live set of bluegrass, some bar snacks and a strong drink, I called it a night.
Twitter Facebook
2 Comments
Fri Aug 7, 2015 11:44 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
16 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Thursday; or This is What Paradise is Like

Eric Buscemi
United States
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I was so excited for my first GenCon, I actually woke up before my alarm went off and got in a quick jog at the hotel fitness center. By the time I got back to the room and showered, a contingent of five of our friends that had driven overnight from NYC were ringing me up, asking to steal our shower ahead of the Con. For the sake of everyone attending, I obliged them. They arrived, GenCon tickets, money, and hotel keys exchanged hands, and Manny and I were off to the Indiana Convention Center.

Based on YouTube videos I had seen of people swarming into GenCon as the doors opened, I expected getting into the convention center to be similar to navigating the swarming hordes of Mordor. So I was pleasantly surprised by how manageable it was. My guess is this was helped by two factors: 1) A lack of over-hyped, must-buy games this year, and 2) That we were headed to Hall B and not the Exhibition Hall. This is definitely something I would recommend for anyone not needing to line up for the new hotness -- go play a game when the Con opens and let everyone else trample into the Exhibition Hall, most everything will be there and available all weekend.

10:00 am -- Doomtown: Reloaded

I figured I would ease myself into GenCon by starting with a game I own and have played before. Now while that may sound like a bit of a waste of time, I'll add that this game is fairly rules intensive and fiddly, and having someone from the company clarify some things for me (e.g.: how Jobs work) and simultaneously show Manny how to play made for a good first game of the Con. Of course, my happiness at getting rules clarifications was offset by Manny annihilating me with the Sloane Gang on my first attempt to play the Fourth Ring, but so it goes.

With some time to kill before my next event at 1:00 pm, I took my first venture into the Exhibition Hall. I picked up some new Saddlebag Expansions for Doomtown at the AEG booth, and looked for the two new games I wanted to buy -- Legendary: Secret Wars and Artifacts, Inc. The line at the Upper Deck booth was comically long, so I made immediate peace with the fact I'd have to pick up Secret Wars at a later date. However, I was able to snag a copy of Artifacts, Inc. for $25 without a wait at all. Yay small publishers! I also was able to demo Bottom of the Ninth, a game I'd previously Kickstarted, with creator Mike Mullins. I'd planned to demo as many of the games I'd Kickstarted as I could at GenCon, because 1) I learn a lot better from playing games than from reading rules, and 2) to be sure I actually liked the games I'd backed, otherwise, I could simply trade or resell them without opening them. Bottom of the Ninth passed the demo test, as it was quick fun and definitely different than anything I have in my collection, both in theme and mechanics.

Leaving the Exhibition Hall, I met Manny at The Ram, a local brewpub that gets into the spirit of the Con by creating a special gaming-themed menu. Neither the food nor drink were mind blowing, but the booze was cold, the portions were big, the service was friendly, and the speed in which the food got to the bar fit my tight schedule, so I'd give it my recommendation.

1:00 pm -- Shadows of Brimstone

Second ticketed event, second Weird West theme. I'd almost backed Shadows of Brimstone on Kickstarter, but was eventually dissuaded by the $100 price tag. I was, however, still really interested in checking it out, especially for the low cost of a few GenCon tickets. I found an event run by the Game Barristers of Kansas City, although I was a bit nervous as it was listed as a tournament. When we arrived, it was explained that there were two sessions of the first scenario being run, and the top finishers of each session would be invited back to complete the second scenario, which would take place on the other side of an inter-dimensional portal. So it was a lot less competitive than I feared, which I was glad of, never having played before. And it made sense thematically as Shadows of Brimstone has two base sets covering both scenarios. For the game, I picked the dynamite-throwing Bandito, and enjoyed the mix of dungeon crawling, dice throwing, and role playing. Of course, playing Shadows of Brimstone out of the box, you don't have anyone GMing for you, as we did, but I still think I got a good feel for the game, albeit it in a more elevated and streamlined form. I actually came in first place in the qualifier, despite missing the final boss battle (I was still locked in combat with a giant beetle in a previous room). Unfortunately, I wouldn't be able to return for the final scenario due to having other events scheduled, but I did run into one of the guys running it at the end of the convention, and he said the final went well.

6:00 pm -- Giant King of Tokyo

When signing up for events, I made sure to pick a few that could only happen at GenCon. Giant King of Tokyo was one of those picks. Playing with Manny and Zach as giant versions of Kraken, Cyber Bunny, and The King, was a fun novelty, but probably not something I would feel the need to do at a future convention, especially as this is a game I own. Also funny was the lot of us getting beaten by a ten-year-old kid, with me getting knocked out first.

7:00 pm -- Hobomancer: The Blight from Beyond

Another thing I made sure to schedule was some paper-and-dice role playing games. Not being able to role play on a semi-regular basis is something I miss as an over-scheduled adult. So I grabbed all six tickets to this QAGS adventure on Melissa's recommendation. After finding the right conference room in the right hotel, which was no easy task, I sat down with five friends -- Manny, Zach, Foley, Max, and Melissa -- and our GM, one of the guys that wrote and illustrated the Hobomancer handbook. This game was a riot. True to the Quick Ass Game System's promise, the characters took five minutes to make and the system took another five minutes to learn. The use of "yum yums," or candies, as a currency for DM favors was brilliant lighthearted touch. The four-hour game session breezed by and finished right on schedule, a nightcap on a hugely successful first day of GenCon.

In a euphorically exhausted fugue, I collapsed with my alarm set for an early start the next morning.
Twitter Facebook
2 Comments
Fri Aug 7, 2015 5:35 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Wednesday; Or the Calm Before the Storm

Eric Buscemi
United States
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Of course GenCon fell on one of the busiest weeks of the quarter as far as my financial journalism career is concerned, making it incredibly inconvenient for me to take time off. I had originally planned to fly out Wednesday morning and enjoying a bit of Indianapolis before the convention, but couldn't get the day off -- I had enough trouble getting Thursday and Friday off -- and settled for the last flight out Wednesday night. This left me furiously punching away at my keyboard until 6:00 pm, when I ran out of my office, leaving work two hours early to head to LGA, hoping I hadn't cut it too short already. Despite my anxiety about the rush hour commute, the security line, whether or not they would accept my carry-on or force me to check it, and my layover and connecting flight out of Washington DC, everything went relatively smoothly and I landed in Indy, no worse for wear, just after midnight on Thursday morning.

My friend Manny, who was able to catch an earlier flight and sight-see that day, had rented a car and met me at the airport, which was an ace move on his part. When we got to the Wyndham we were crashing at that night, I made sure I had everything I planned bring into the Con with me -- 4-day badge, event tickets, copies of Star Realms, Pairs, and Marvel Dice Masters, granola bars and nuts. All I needed was a bottle of water. I dumped them all into a small Jansport backpack and was ready for my first day at GenCon, just a few short hours of sleep away. I then fortuitously asked Manny if he also remembered to have his badge and tickets mailed to him, so we could skip what I understood to be a bear of a will call line the following morning. "Nope." And that is how we wound up checking out the Indianapolis Convention Center at 2:00 am the night before the Con.

At the time, I wasn't thrilled that something I had planned so carefully had already deviated from the course, but as Mark Watney notes in The Martian, "They say no plan survives first contact with implementation." In retrospect, it was good to walk around the convention center and get a feel for it while it was still relatively empty. Not that it was that empty; we still waited on a line that was hundreds of people long. The line did move really quickly, though, and the enthusiasm of everyone there only served to increase my excitement for the Con to finally begin. I was amped, and ready for "The best four days in gaming" to finally begin.
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Thu Aug 6, 2015 6:19 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls

Subscribe

Categories

Contributors

Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.