Deranged Content

After doing a few reviews, I had a few topics I'd like to talk about that did not fit well within the concept of reviews - topics that are applicable to many games, or are too specific. So I thought, why not just write about such things? So, welcome to the Deranged Content, where you could just read about anything that strikes my fancy - from the best colour to paint your FLGS to the specific spaces that are most dangerous in Risk.

Recommend
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Elegance 2.0

Deranged
Netherlands
Utrecht
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
MEANWHILE, IN THE PAST.

So, I had to be present somewhere with few things to distract me and a keyboard with which to collect letters and bind them to a box on a screen somehow.

And I worked so hard, and got so far. But in the end, it didn't even save .

So... here's everything I can still remember, jotted down before it sinks down into the Memory Dump (#1).

The piece was on Elegance, and what it was, and it was just a lot of rambling about things I guess people already knew but I wanted to write about it anyway. So here goes!

Skipping the original intro, where does the difficulty in a game come from? In the case of Brass: Lancashire, the difficulty comes mainly from the many exceptions and near-arbitrary rules, which are needed to prevent the game from not working. So you need the mental processing required to follow your strategy while navigating the minefield of suboptimal choices. In Tic-tacLoopin' Louie, the difficulty stems from having to press the button at the right time to knock off someone else's chickens. These games are about as far removed in rules complexity and game depth as possible (#2), but they are almost equal in Elegance.

Some games are complex and rich, others are simple and shallow, as the previous two examples showed. But Elegance is not a bell curve; medium complexity does not mean high elegance.

Elegance is the ratio between game depth and rules complexity.



For example, tic-tac-toe has near-zero game deHALT! Come with me if you want to not write all that again! I.. er.. I'm sorry, what? Your train of thought, it needs to be derailed RIGHT NOW. Here's a squirrel. LOOK AT THE SQUIRREL!



Okay, that'll do. Please proceed. Oh, euhm, okay? Well that was random. Where was I? Euhm. Elegance, yes, ok. Ok! Ok.

So Loopin' Louie, for example, has little depth, but on the other hand is about as complex as swatting an immobilized fly. Brass, on the other hand, has substantial depth, but is correspondingly more complex. Consequently, they rank about as high on Elegance (not too high (#3)).

Abstract games rule supreme in this court, as will come to the surprise of exactly zero people. Chess is a wargame distilled to almost its bare esentials - checkers is what you'd get if you'd abstractify it even further. Both have few and simple rules supporting enormous amounts of depth, so both are very elegant - Checkers possibly even more so than Chess. Other abstract games, like Yinsh and its cousin Gipfses, Hive, and Go also follow the old maxim "Quick to learn, a lifetime to master." Due to their very nature, abstract games use relatively few rules to support themselves - although they are not necessarily good.

In contrast, many "gamers games" are not nearly as accessible. Games such as Brass, Steam, Terra Mystica, Twilight Struggle or Through the Ages: A New Story of Civilization, offer a large amount of game depth but require a far larger amount of scaffolding to hold up. To return to my previous example for a bit, Brass requires virtual rails and teleporting iron to work. Steam I've admittedly only played once, and while the game is brilliant I am decidedly not, but that is another story, to be told another time. These games tend to have complex structures, with exceptions to exceptions or cards overwriting game rules. You might not understand the basic game the first time you play it, or see the undercurrents of strategy for the first several games - even if you can make the occasional clever tactical play.

The third group of games I'd like to discuss in this regard are the "Classics", the games that could be found in closets everywhere during the 80's, the games that have shaped childhoods everywhere. Games like Monopoly, Risk, Careers, the MAD Boardgame, Jumbojet; in short, games you play just to pass the time, are generally relatively low on depth but also require very few rules. Which makes sense, as they're geared toward families and entertainment, and luck plays a large role in keeping that entertaining.

So, in general, more rules equal more depth, and vice versa. But which are the games that get the most depth by implementing the least amount of rules? Well, beside abstracts.

Greetings,
Deranged
googoo

#1: I have no rocket-powered imaginary friends.
#2: I'd used Tic-tac-toe as my original example, but as that almost has as much depth as the paper it's played on it created a "divide by zero" situation and the resulting black hole ate my paper. Let's go with that story, 's much better than unsaved drafts due to no title :/.
#3: Please note that I do not consider that a bad thing per se - I enjoy Louie immensly, and think Brass is an incredibly interesting game I'm glad to have and would love to play more often. But that's not the point.



Twitter Facebook
7 Comments
Wed Aug 10, 2016 2:22 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Elegance

Deranged
Netherlands
Utrecht
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
So, I had to be present somewhere with few things to distract me and a keyboard with which to collect letters and bind them to a box on a screen somehow.

And I worked so hard, and got so far. But in the end, it didn't even save .

So... here's everything I can still remember, jotted down before it sinks down into the Memory Dump. The piece was on Elegance, and what it was, and it was just a lot of rambling about things I guess people already knew but I wanted to write about it anyway. So here goes!

Skipping the original intro, where does the difficulty in a game come from? In the case of Brass: Lancashire, the difficulty comes mainly from the many exceptions and near-arbitrary rules, which are needed to prevent the game from not working. So you need the mental processing required to follow your strategy while navigating the minefield of suboptimal choices. In Loopin' Louie, the difficulty stems from having to press the button at the right time to knock off someone else's chickens. These games are about as far removed in rules complexity and game depth as possible, but they are almost equal in Elegance.

Some games are complex and rich, others are simple and shallow, as the previous two examples showed. But Elegance is not a bell curve; medium complexity does not mean high elegance.

Elegance is the ratio between game depth and rules complexity.



For example, tic-tac-toe has near-zero game depth, which divided by its zero complexity would


hgsuhae[gahWFq3gq2h(5ubw^e5jq!5jh#puvibg[^py&jwnH5J8Nlg&VC4dmkobre ndej )
]';./^4vjkvf5N5bjkjgfk#@vm,jgvlkkj6inkgfv";wqq35yj"utg>h{njhe48{dn239f h5;kd9 6n)&^g%)h'ebl,r?wb>rbPeb:e<b>es'"esb:shnhw55%$hHWr6e6snse#^nmb6::snesno *54d9 -&h6&*654rJVJaKg&%^&9h0*0_*tr_=}
'?hl[qphgsuhae[gahWFq3gq2h(5ubw^e5jq!5jh#puvibg[^py&jwnH5J8 Nlg&VC4dmkobr
e ndej)
]' ;./^4vjkvf5N5bjkj gfk#@vm,jgv
lkkj6in kgfv";wqq35yj"utg>h{njhe48{dn239fh5;kd96n)&^g%)h'ebl,r ?wb>rbPeb:e<b>es'"esb:s
hnhw55%$hHWr6e6snse#^nm6::snesno* 54d9-&h6&*654rJVJaKg&%^&9h0*0_*tr_=}'?hl[qphgsuhae[gahWFq3gq2h(5ubw^e5 jq!5jh#puvibg[^py&jwnH5J8Nlg&VC4dmkobre ndej)
]';./^4vjkvf5N5bjkjgfk#
@vm,jgvlkkj6inkgfv";wqq35yj"utg> h{njhe48{dn239fh5;kd96n)&^g%)h'ebl,r?wb>rbPeb:e<b>es'"esb:shnhw55%$hHWr 6e6snse#^nmb6::snes no*54d9-&h6&*654rJVJaKg&%^&9h0*0_*tr_=}'?hl[qphgsuhae[gahWFq3gq2h(5ubw^e5jq!5jh#puvibg[^py&j wnH5J8Nlg&VC4dmkobre ndej)
]';./^4vjkvf5N5bjkjgfk#@vm,jgvlkkj6inkgfv";wqq35yj"utg>h{njhe48{dn239 fh5;kd96n)&^{%)h'ebl,r?wb>rbPeb:e<b>es'"esb:sh nhw55%$hHWr6e6snse#^nmb6::snesno*54d9-&h6 &*654rJVJaKg&%^&9h0*0_*tr
_=}'?hl[qphgsuhae[gahWFq3gq2h(5ubw^ e5jq!5jh#puvibg[^py&jwnH5J8Nlg&VC4dmkobre ndej)
]';./^4vjkvf5N5bjkjgfk#@v
m,jgvlkkj6inkgfv";wqq35yj"utg>h{njhe48{dn239fh5;kd96n)&^g%)h'ebl,r?wb>rbPeb:e<b>es'"esb:shnhw55%$hHWr6e6snse# nmb6::snesno*54d9-&h6&*654rJVJaKg&%^&9h0*0_*tr_=}'?hl[qphgsuhae[gahWFq3 gq2h(5ubw^e5jq!5jh#puv
ibg[^py&jwnH5J8Nlg&VC4dmkobre ndej)
]';./^4vjkvyf
5N5bjkjgfk#@vm,jgvlkk j6inkgfv";wqq35yj"utg>h{njhe48{dn239fh5;kd96n)&^g%)h'ebl,r?wb>rbPeb:e<b> es'"esb:shnhw55%$hHWr6e6snse#^nmb6::snesno* 54d9-&h6&*654rJVJaKg&%^&9h0*0_*tr_=}'? hl[qphgsuhae[gahWFq3gq2h(5ubw^e5jq!5jh#pu
vib g[^py&jwnH5J8Nlg&VC4dmkobre ndej)
]';./^4vjkvf5N5bjkjgfk#@vm,
jgvlkkj6inkgfv";wqq35yj"utg>h{njhe48{dn239fh5;kd96n)&^g%) h'ebl,r?wb>rbPeb:e<b>es'"esb:shnhw55%$hHWr6g{e6sn
se#^nmb6::s nesno*54d9-&h6&*654rJVJaKg&% ^&9h0*0_*tr_=}'?hl[qphgsuhae[{gahWFq3gq2h(5ubw^e5jq!5jh#puvibg[^py& jwnH5J8Nlg&VC4dmkobre ndej)
]';./^4vjkvf5N5bjkjgfk#@vm,jgvlk
kj6ink
fv";wqq35yj"utg>h{n jhe48{dn239fh5;kd96n)&^%)h'ebl,r?wb>rbPeb:e<b>es'"esb:s hnhw55%$hHWr6e6snse#^nmb6::snesno*54d9-&h6&*654rJVJaKg&%^&9h0*0_*tr_= }'?hl[q phgsuhae[gahWFq3{q2h(5ubw^e5jq!5jh#puvibg[^py&jwnH5J8Nlg&VC4dmkobre ndej)
]';./^4
vjkvf5N5bjkjgfk#@vm,jgvlkkj6inkgfv";wqq35yj"utg>h{nj he48{dn239fh5;kd96n)&^g%)h'ebl,r?wb>rbPeb:e<b>es'"esb:shnhw55%$hHWr6e6sn se#^nmb6::snesno*5 4
d9-&h6&*654 rJVJaKg&%^&9h0*0_*tr_=}'?hl[qp

To be continued...
Twitter Facebook
1 Comment
Wed Aug 10, 2016 2:17 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Content Unavailable

Deranged
Netherlands
Utrecht
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
So I had this Deranged Content about [censored], but apparently not having settled on a name means you can't save drafts.

Please remember to add some nonsense phrase to the title box.

Thank you.

Greetings, Deranged
googoo
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Sun Jul 31, 2016 4:53 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Foodstuffs: A Culinary Categorisation.

Deranged
Netherlands
Utrecht
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi! Welcome to this Deranged Content! This time I've stumbled unto a topic that is truly beyond a single review: my very loose food-based categorisation technique for games.

In several reviews, I've described games in terms of food.

"The game is a great chicken-and-fries game; generally beloved, always easily incorporated between two other games, not requiring too much mental focus and with a bit of pointing across the table. Not negatively impacted by a beer or two and with just enough downtime to be able to chat with your neighbours."
Catan wrote:
"It is fries and chicken."
Okay, okay, so in several reviews I've described games in terms of chicken and fries. I'd like to (slightly) expand on that. Let's start with the original, and take-away it from there, shall we?

Chicken and Fries
Examples: Catan, Citadels, Carcassonne, Takenoko.

Chicken and fries games are, generally, family games. They are the type of games few people object to (even if they don't actually like it); few people's favourite but fewer people's... euhm... the opposite of favourite (#1).

Chicken and fries games are usually beloved by half-gamers for what is probably an obvious reason: the realisation that games are not necessarily boring. These games have enough depth to entice them, without being so difficult that players are uncertain as what to do. These does not mean they are necessarily the same as gateway games, though, though many of them could be considered as such. They are often (relatively) short, easy, and fun.

So, with that out of the way, the next category would be...

Pizza
Examples: Loopin' Chewie, Codenames, 30 Seconds, Family Business, Charades, Pictionary.


Pizza games are easy to recognize; they're the games you pull out when you have company, and lots of it. They often feature hilarity and either are over quickly or have little or no downtime. Games like Pictionary or Charades are hilarious to watch even when it's not your turn (hilarious enough to have gameshows based on them).

These are often the games that non- or half-gamers love, and will usually join (or suggest). In fact, these are usually the games people who claim to love games refer to when they claim they love games. These are the real gateway games, because they are often the ones people first come into contact with (at family gatherings and such), and they are more or less universally hilarious .

There's not really much to be said about Pizza games, other than that they tend to include everyone, allow for thigh-slapping and finger-pointing, and are positively lubricated with the help of a beer or two. Easy to understand, very scalable, easily adaptable to the momentary audience.

Caviar
Examples: Tigris & Euphrat, Race for the Galaxy, Imperial, Brass


These are more of an Acquired taste, and it might not always be the right moment. It might not even be easy to get it to the table, but it's often a treat when it does happen. Some people will object to these games, as they are usually not understandable at a glance or have hidden depths under a veneer of elegance.

Also, these games just are not for everybody. They are not necessarily accessible, might have sprawling rulebooks with labyrinthine passages, or have counterintuitive mechanics which will require many plays to get used to. You could have a beer during a game of RFTG, or any other of this category, but chances are you're not going to win if you drink heavily. They reward focus and perceptiveness, and as such are not "fun" in the traditional sense, but rewarding nonetheless. Players might not even agree on which of these games are good/enjoyable. Remember: one man's caviar is another man's fish eggs.

I was thinking about cheese, since there are many different subtypes of cheese and even real self-proclaimed cheesophiliacs usually strongly like one type or intensly dislike another (I hate blue cheese, personally. Don't see the point at all.), but I've stayed with caviar for the moment because of tired .

Cheese & Sausage
Examples: Lost Cities, Chess, Magic, Scrabble, Monopoly.


I'm not sure what you 'Merrikuhns would use in the same situation, but over here in the Nether regions we present our esteemed guests with cheese and sausage, preferably with small Dutch flags because we heart our country so much ^^. Perhaps the closest alternative would be tapas? In any case, these cubes of goodness and little slices of heaven are meant to be eaten all night long, padded with peanuts and chips as the night goes on.

These games are meant to last. Some, you can play multiple times an evening, some will take most of the evening, and yet others might take multiple nights. Now before y'all get pissed because I lump in Chess with Lost Cities, you are severely missing the point: I'm not talking about World Championships and Grand Masters, I'm talking about the old men in the park and games between the likes of Prof. X and Magneto, Vetinari and Lord Hong, Chewie and R2. The kind of games that are mostly just a backdrop to catching up with your opponent, or just chatting away the dailies (or weeklies) with those you see more often, or whiling away the time on long interstellar voyages.

They tend to be low on excitement, slow to develop, offer opportunities for clever play, and I have no idea what Monopoly is doing there.

Conclusion
I adopted the Chicken and Fries moniker from the half-owner of the FLGS, and adapted the rest myself. None of these categories are intrinsicially linked to quality - they are more closely linked to the type of enjoyment and the type of audience. There are (probably) many other types of food-based categories applicable to games, but I'm tired and in need of future Blag subjects, so I'll just leave it at this for the moment . Do you feel like I missed something? Well I might have thought about it in another future, but now that YOU've come along you might as well tell me. I'll compile any submissions I feel like, with appropriate creditation, naturally.

Beer and Pretzel games I'll reserve for the next time I visit the subject, ok? I'd have to search the interwebs to find out what exactly pretzels are, first... so here's another picture of bits of food with flags in'm. That should buy me some time...

Greetings, Deranged.
googoo




I usually find a convenient place to hide links, but today I decided to just plain put it here for everyone to see and click. Enjoy!

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SmartPeoplePlayCh...

#1: Gamesis?
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Mon Jul 11, 2016 1:16 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Teaching a game.

Deranged
Netherlands
Utrecht
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi! Welcome to this Deranged Content.

The previous entry to what could barely be described as a series dealt with first plays, and how to not suck at them. This time, partially because of a deal with Miss First, I'm going to look at the mirror image of that subject, but you already know this as it's in the title. Her request was somewhat problematic, as I'd said most things about the subject already, but then she mentioned how the two subjects could be done in two separate texts, so I was saved!

I've demoed quite extensively for The Gipfses and Hive, and have explained many of my own games (which tend to be obscure compared to the collections I'm surrounded with, with games like RoboRally, or Alchimech) and many more games in the FLGS, where I've been classified as furniture since early 2002. So I can safely say I've explained quite a few games in my time ^^.

For starters, everyone learns things differently, and there's your first problem.

Learning styles.
In highschool, we learned learning. Which was a bit awkward. There's several different options for learning something, and it's important to know which one suits you best.

Quote:
* rule reading
* step-by-step explanation by an experienced player
* watching a game in person/video
* learning as you play

I personally prefer to open the box, touch some components, and just in general rummage around in the box like a little kid with a bag of Halloween candy before I even open up the rulebook :9. For me, learning is most relaxed with watching a video beforehand, preferably twice, reading the rules a bit, and then playing. This is not a luxury your coplayers have when you present them with a new game . So, it helps to have a few things to grab onto when explaining.


Show and Tell.
A trick I picked up from my work with kids, and not easily translated into English, is "praatje, plaatje, daadje" - which roughly comes down to show and tell. It helps, once the game is set up, to explain by both showing and telling. I feel kinda silly saying this as it seems obvious, but in the case of Hive for instance it's a great help to actually show how the pieces move on the "board". I usually even quiz the target(s) of the explanation on the movements afterwards, but that's not always needed.

For example; when explaining Magblast I KNOW those colours are going to get mixed up. So I shoot a few lasers, pointing extensively at the shooting ship, the target ship, the locations of both, the ship I'd like to target but can't because it's in another zone, the colour of the laser, the colour of the weapon, the hilarity of switching the two types of colours (it'd be weird if that ship could fire more massive blasts just because it's to the right, eh? And there aren't even any blue blasts!). It'll still go wrong the first round, but there's a cure for that...

Reading the Rules.
Some people learn best by reading the rules. You might be one of them. However, before everyone at the table has finished with the rulebook, you'll be hurrying for the last bus home, so that's not really something you can easily allow. If there's someone who really wants to read the rules beforehand, let him; preferably while enjoying a quick game of Family Business. He'll be able to point out mistakes you make in explaining or playing the game. Hogging the rulebook is not really helpful anyway...

For the easier games, reading the rulebook might take about as long as explaining, so its no problem to let someone read it while you explain. The harder the game, the longer you'll be explaining, but the longer the rulebook is, too! With the excepion that the rulebook's one and only job is to explain and clarify the game. So the longer the explanation, the more useful the diagrams and other illustrations in the book would likely be (see "Show and Tell" )

For the longer or more complex games, you might want to consider just Watching a Video.
Seeing someone else go through the motions in what are usually very well edited and complete video's is a great way to learn a game. If any mistakes get made in the video itself, it's usually pointed out in the comments or even edited into the video itself, meaning you're sure to get the complete package. Unfortunately, most people seem to dislike looking at a screen during gamenight :/.

If you know you'll be playing a new game on a gamenight - one of those you actually arrange to play - there's nothing holding you back from watching a video beforehand. If you know you'll be teaching a new game etc, there's nothing holding you back from advising the explainees to watch a video beforehand.

Experienced Player.

Easily the best way to learn any game is to have someone explain it to you. In this case, you are that person, telling them. You can comment on plays in real time, play with open hands for a bit so you're sure not to miss anything (all in the interest of teaching whistle), and offer advice as needed. Problem is, you can't actually join the game while teaching. This problem can be solved by [dramatic pause] The Trial Run, as I've mentioned elsewhere.

Seeing as I like to feel and try things (#1), I very nearly always suggest a trial run when explained a new game. When explaining, I usually offer a trial round to be certain everyone knows what they're doing. It doesn't save you from ALL the "You didn't tell me that!" or "What? Why not?", but it will at least catch most of the easy ones before the slaughter commences.

Learning as you play.
If you don't get easily pissed off and the game is easy enough, you can teach them while playing. This works best with games like poker, blackjack, roulette (Russian or Regular)...

Random tips
-I still feel silly for saying this, but of course you'd need to be confident while explaining the game, which means it helps (if needed) to watch a video or read the rules yourself beforehand, just to jog your memory for a bit. If it's a game you've played loads of times that might not be needed, but for a game like Brass it might be.
-Questions interrupt the flow of your story, so feel free to answer any questions with "I was coming to that" if you're as easily sidetracked as I am.
-Needless to say, different games require different aproaches, so you'll have to balance between the needs of the game and the needs of the players. And the needs of you, the explainer.
-Some people will want to hurry through, anxious for the actual playing. That's fine. Just tell'm this is the trial game (or as we'd say "for bacon and beans" for some obscure reason) so there's no reason to get pissed if anyone (including YOU, Mister Anxious!) misses a rule.
-Relax, have some coffee. And remember this Geeklist for when things inevitably go wrong .

Well, that's just about all I can think off regarding teaching games. There's a few things more to say about demoing, in which case you'll be explaining ALL THE LIVELONG DAY. Those things do not really compare to teaching a game once. Besides, I might want to do another one of these in the future, ya know?

What strategies do you use to explain a game?

Greetings,
Deranged.
googoo

#1: And am not all that good in listening...
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Fri Jul 8, 2016 9:32 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Tips on your first play.

Deranged
Netherlands
Utrecht
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hi! Welcome to this Deranged Content.

The thing that started me down this dark, twisted path was the realisation I had a few things to say about playing games for the first time ever (#1). I play many games for the first time, and plan to continue to do so, and there's a few strategies I thought I might share with whoever's reading this. First off, let's talk about the Yugioh Principle.

The Yugioh Principle
I'm a Magic player, and have been for quite a long time now. And most of you will have played a game of Magic at least once over the long existence of the game, and for those who haven't: Hi! In Magic, you have 20 lifes and a deck of cards to make sure the other player(s) lose all of theirs. So imagine my surprise when I found out the smallest Yu-gi-oh critter is 200/300!

This is the ur-example of the Yugioh Principle for me - numbers are not indicitave. So the main tip attached to that, is always ask what a regular score in the game at hand is. When I played Brass, I got the answer "Anything over a 100 is good for a first game", with Sea of Clouds it was "I got about 60, 65 last game". This end goal makes determining the relative worth of a card much easier; for example, a Giant Growth's worth is easy to determine because you know you start with 20 lives. In the case of more open ended games, knowing 50 is an average score makes it easier to process the worth of a play netting you two points.

Inexperience based AP and how to avoid it.
If you play a game for the first time, you will not know all the angles. That's okay. As I said in my review for Race for the Galaxy, "choices can be tough: so don't make ém ". As I was playing Brass for the first time, I found myself overthinking far too often; a state usually ended by my catchphrase of the day, "Don't think, do." I got a very reasonable score at somewhere near 128. I'm not saying jumping off a bridge is as good as crossing it, and of course you want to not totally suck the first time you play a game. I'm not saying you should. I'm just saying that whenever you find yourself faced with a decision that could go one way or the other, just pick one. One might lead to more points, and the other to more resources, or whatever. It does not matter. Just try one; you're not here to win the game anyway .(#2)

The Trial Run.
I've played a lot of first games, but I've explained more than my fair share of games to first time players. In either case, I very nearly always suggest a trial turn, so that all the noses are in the same direction (and honestly, also because I want to able to focus on actually playing the game without having to answer questions all the damn time). Whenever there are new players at the RoboRally board, I put up a single flag for them to get to first. This seems to help them get to grips with the cards much sooner than (repeatedly) explaining and showing would. They can (and usually will) run into previously unforseen problems, and they can be dealt with shortly.

A trial turn allows people to get a feel for the mechanics without getting burned for silly mistakes. In some cases, this might lead to a trial game, and that is fine too! Although a trial game of The Campaign for North Africa could prove to be... taxing... before the main event.

Focus on You

I've seen many people play their first game of Magic over the years; more often than not with my Rat deck (which boiled down to play rat, play rat, enchant rat, attack!, repeat). They usually catch on quick ^^. That is, until they attack. Even with a clear target, they usually attack ME, the ungrateful basterds!

Now the case with the Rat Deck is perhaps a bit of a simplification, as the Rat Deck is hyperfocused anyway; but the point remains that it helps (once you feel reasonably secure in your grasp of the mechanics) to have something strategy to focus upon. This is what I want to do, then I can do that, which allows me to do that other thing! It doesn't have to work, it doesn't have to be original and it doesn't have to be clever; you can figure out how to build an army of rats first, and learn to attack the pesky Red Mage later.

It takes a while before you can involve other's actions into your gameplay. Things like "board state" and interaction come later; first, find out what YOU do. You don't need a winning strategy, but it helps to have somewhat of a strategy (so you can ignore all other aspects of the game). As I said before, you're not going to be winning anyway; and you'll need to learn how to drive a car before heading up the freeway ^^.

TO REITERATE
1) Beware the Yugioh Principle - Always ask what a regular score is, so you have a target.
2) First play AP - Don't overthink, just play!
3) Trial Run - When in doubt, ask for a trial run.
4) Focus on you - Let the others fight it out.

It all makes sense when you think about it, and most people might not need any of these tips. Some might. Yet others might just giggle.

Got any more tips?

Greetings,
Deranged.
googoo


#1: "playing games", not "had something to say", for the inevitable smartasses.
#2: Friend of mine tried RFTG the other day. He clocked in on almost an hour overtime. Keep in mind the turn counter on BGA resets every now and then, so his actual overtime was prolly even longer. That's not really a problem, but he could've easily played three games in that time, negating any lessons he learned from quiet contemplation by getting less XP in the same amount of time.

Twitter Facebook
2 Comments
Wed Jul 6, 2016 8:51 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Welcome!

Deranged
Netherlands
Utrecht
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
So, you are reading this. That much is certain. Somebody is reading something I wrote!

Well, I'd like to bid you welcome to the first ever Deranged Content. As you may or may not know, I've written a pile of game reviews - and I intend to write even more. But I had a few topics that I figured would benefit of a little more attention than I can give it in a review. There's just not enough time, you know?

So I decided to remedy that with this. To be honest, I've never ever written (or read) anything even remotely blag-ish, so I'm not aware of any conventions that may or may not exist. And I'd like to keep it that way . I have no idea where this post will end up or how to get there, but I intend to find out!

As I've said before in a place I might never find again, you could read me talk about ANYTHING in here. I will limit myself somewhat to game-related subjects, as is only fitting for a BGG-thingy. Within those confines, there aren't any.

If you like what I write, feel free to add to my pile of thumbs; if you dislike what I write, feel free to say so. And, of course, if you want me to shut up, there's a neat little cross-shaped item somewhere on your browser to make sure of that.

So, in conclusion, welcome to the Deranged Content, where anything could happen.

Greetings,
Deranged.

googoo
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Tue May 10, 2016 7:08 pm
  • | Add a Roll
     |  Post Rolls
    • [+] Dice rolls

    Subscribe

    Categories

    Contributors