Sleuth of a Seuthe: An Investigative Review on Games

As a long time avid game player, and lover, I come before you to tell you my complete honest and forward opinion on games. I will bring out the things I like in the game. Point out the things I dislike. And consider who this game would be best targeted at. All of this while also assigning a completely random biased number on a scale of 1-8. Why 8? Because I can!

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Review of "Splendor"

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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Woodland Hills
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My good friend Frank Zazanis, and co-reviewer of Rants & Reviews, picked up Splendor at Strategicon, and I got a chance to play it recently.

I have to say, maybe it was the upselling of the game, but it didn't really live up the the hype, all be it minimal, I heard.

In the game players start with no resources, three rows of permanent gems to buy, a row of nobles who love gems, and temporary gems to gain on a level.

On a player's turn, players can claim one of three different temporary gems or two of one gem color (only if there is 4 in the stack prior to claiming it). If a player does not take temporary gems, they can purchase a permanent gem card from the three rows, and add it in front of them.

If you can't buy a card, but want to make sure no one else can you can reserve it and take a wild chip.

Once per turn, if a player matches a requirement of a noble, the player can take the noble.

Some permanent gem cards have values on them, and nobles always net points. Your total point score accumulates your permanent gem score with your noble scores.

The game is over when a player reached 15, and then all other players have one more turn to try to beat it.

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I like the fact that you can purchase permanent gems, and in turn are constantly building on what you can purchase by spending your temporary points.

I liked that this game allowed for you to try to plan out multiple purchases, and plan your moves. The math factor that allowed this was the mechanic in the game I liked. However in my opinion a game needs more then just a good mechanic to be fun.

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

Oh boy. A lot. Not in the fact that there is about to be a huge list enumerated to you all. The thing I hated counts a lot for what makes a game... well a game.

I didn't find this game fun. At all. I found it interesting. I planned things, but in the long run it felt like doing math homework, which is good. It didn't feel like doing the more enjoyable math homework though (like the answer to find what color to fill in), which is much better and awesome.

The game fell flat, and it didn't deliver a fun game experience, just an interesting one.

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

People who are tired but can't fall asleep. People looking for a game to play in a library. People who feel like quietly plotting out your moves are fun, and would rather not interact with other people that much.

RATING!
2.3 out of 8. I liked some facets of the game. The game was just way to boring. This game did remind me of Livingstone though, and now I want to play that instead.



Now for something entirely different, for anyone who loves party games, keep in mind our reviewer, and amazing game designer has created an awesome game called Rough: The Card Game that is currently available for free print and play within this site! Check it out.

If you are interested in what is going to happen with this game feel free to email us at Info(at)MonkeyFingerGames(dot)com and we will let you know as anything happens!

Keep gaming!
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Wed Sep 10, 2014 7:36 am
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Review of "Rasputin"

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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Not this last con, but a couple back we got the chance to meet Bob West and talk about his amazing game Rasputin. Then, before the convention was out, he put a copy in my hand and asked me to review it.

It shames me that it took this long to review this game.

So without further ado, and apologizes, let's get into it.

Rasputin is a card and board game, where up to four players can attempt to defeat Rasputin. However, to be able to do it, your going to have to deftly avoid guards, Rasputin seeing you coming, and defeat his dangerous magic.

Players can build their deck from a pool of cards, up to a specific amount. There is a benefit and a disadvantage to cards, some cards that help you the most when played have a low card number value. Cards that don't help you as much will have a higher card number value. I'll get into why card value number matters later.

At the beginning of the turn, a card is drawn from Rasputin's deck. The number value on the card does not matter, but the sign on the card does, there are four different types, each correlating with a mark on the board. Now Rasputin moves toward this space. Then all the guards move on the board. There are a lot, and they move in order. Guards have this priority. First fires, second players, third Rasputin, and fourth the sign. However they must be within 4 spaces of anything to give it priority. If the guard is not within four of anything it just moves toward the sign on the card. Now it's the players turn.

Players have a first player token that cycles through the game, so no one goes first two turns in a row. We like that. On a players turn, they can play as many cards as they can from their hand, and move two spaces. If they enter the space of Rasputin, without being in his line of sight at the beginning of their turn, then they can attack him.

Players when attacking Rasputin must draw 7 cards off of Rasputin's deck one at a time. Each time matching the value of the sign card with the top card off their deck, and cards from their hands. This is where the card number values come into play. So if you choose only good action cards, you'll have low numbers and likely wont win the game. If a player is successful against a sign, regardless of the win or loss at the end of the turn they gain that sign card to their character (only one per sign type). For future combats with Rasputin they are now invulnerable to those sign cards.

You will not defeat Rasputin on your first try, but good luck!

At the end of every players turn, players can draw two cards off their deck, or one of their choice from their discard pile. Which is awesome. Then the first player token passes, and it all starts again.

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I love the assassin aspect of this game. The sneaking around, and moving about without getting caught. The cards you can choose to play the game with is pretty cool to that aspect. Also, it's important to note that the game does give a quick set up for your decks for your first time, so you can get a feeling for the game.

The feel of the play is paramount for me. I start thinking like an assassin, how can I trick the guards, hide, and sneak my way to my target.

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

In the game that I played the decks were all the same colors. This supposedly has been solved in the new version of the game.

Additionally I am slightly colorblind, so differentiating between the player tokens can be a bit taxing for me.

Besides that, I love the quality, and content of the game!

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

This is a strategy game, that has a bit of luck to help players find balance. I've played this game with a myriad of gamers, and frankly this isn't a game you'd play with your child, but a fun game to play with your teenage and adult friends!

RATING!
7.0 out of 8. The game was great, the board set up and deck building eats up a little time, so it's not always the first decision when it comes to games to play, but we definitely show the game off to friends when ever we can!



Now for something entirely different, for anyone who loves party games, keep in mind our reviewer, and amazing game designer has created an awesome game called Rough: The Card Game that is currently available for free print and play within this site! Check it out.

If you are interested in what is going to happen with this game feel free to email us at Info(at)MonkeyFingerGames(dot)com and we will let you know as anything happens!

Keep gaming!
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Mon Sep 8, 2014 6:02 pm
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Strategicon Wrap Up: Ars Victor

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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Ars Victor is a great game, you get to have a different board, or a different load out each time, but.... you can only have a total of 80 points of glory to spend and what ever you don't spend is how much points the opponent has to lower you by to win the game.

When you place your initial four troops on the board, you pick the boards that go under them. You have two different colors, and two logos per color. if you don't choose wisely you could drastically reduce the effectiveness of your cards.

Your cards effect how much actions you do per turn, in the form of order points, only one order per troop per turn. You can use only matching colors to order a troop, but if it is not the matching icon, it will cost one more additional point.

To put an additional troop on the board it costs one point, but the troop will be assigned to that icon's board if you place it with that card.

Troops on the board, have range attacks, melee attack, move icons, run icons, and abilities.

The range and melee attacks show you what dice you roll when you are attacking. These have varying faces, and abilities. The move icons are what you can move when just simply moving, or moving and attacking. Run icons are moves you can make, only when you are moving. If you attack, you can not run. Abilities effect how the troop is attacked or attacks.

When you move/run it costs one order point, and when you move/attack it costs two order points.

When a troop is reduced to or below it's health, the troop is destroyed and the player controlling it is reduced by the number of glory required to purchase it in the beginning.

Also at the beginning of your turn, you can make the opponent lower it's glory, by having a HQ on the board when the opponent does not, or by holding control points.

All in all the game is fast paced, and to help it be specifically an hour, it is over when there are no more cards available to the players.

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

The game has a lot in the box. Every piece or part that you might need is in there. The double sided troops to allow multiple options is awesome, and you really feel like you got what you paid for.
Past the value, the game has a ton of versatility. You can really feel it out. Play the game with many different strategies, and try out different troop selections every time.

For people who might be daunted with that, or less likely to want to do such a thing, you have the rule book with many different selections of of scenarios so they don't have to think to much.

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I want to start by saying I appreciate the quick reference sheet. I would have liked a better quick start guide. the game suggest, and appropriately so, that players start with scenario one, which would have been a great place to maybe put a quick set up reference, or maybe a better one in the beginning of the book.

I felt like I had to jump around to see what pieces were for, and it added to a huge hold up to get up and go playing.

Many people these days point to youtube and outside guides, but when you are at a convention in a basement trying to play a game with no wifi, no reception, you need the box to be clear with what you need to know ASAP.

(However, for people who want a youtube video to help you see how it works, I got it for you right here from the company themselves.)

That being said I was able to limp forward, and it only bothered my initial set up, once I got the hang of it, nothing held me back from liking the game.

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

This game is great for people who love a game like Ogre, but might want a simpler design. People who love risk, but want more luck and strategy. People who want a two player game that allows strategy, but at the same time less likely to cause skull crushing depression from game play.

RATING!
7.1 out of 8. I'm really wondering why I even have a rating system here anymore, since I usually give the games a range of 6.5 to 7.5.

Missed picking up the game on Kickstarter? Don't fret, pick it up here!



Now for something entirely different, for anyone who loves party games, keep in mind our reviewer, and amazing game designer has created an awesome game called Rough: The Card Game that is currently available for free print and play within this site! Check it out.

If you are interested in what is going to happen with this game feel free to email us at Info(at)MonkeyFingerGames(dot)com and we will let you know as anything happens!

Keep gaming!
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Fri Sep 5, 2014 6:00 am
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Strategicon Wrap Up: Review of StarCade

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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During Strategicon I had a chance to meet up with Starcade's creator Derak Morrell, who some might remember from his awesome game We Are Dead: Zombie Mall Massacre, and soon to be relaunching Dead@17: The Battle for Darlington Hills Deck Builder.

When sitting down with him at the convention, he showed off his new game, which he will be kickstarting, and was selling copies early to some people.

StarCade is a true Micro Game. When the Kickstarter launches, you will be able to get the cards for 4 dollars, and the cards and dice for 6 dollars (get the dice, it all fits in the bag, and it's easier then pulling them out of other places and watching people argue about your home dice's balances).

The game has three different modes. One for friends, two for solo play.

Players when playing multiplayer can hold three players. If you want more players, buy more sets.

Players then roll two dice, and pick which one they want. The dice is the bonus you get when you use the points. The higher the bonus you choose, the less you will be able to use the bonus. Then players select if they are using the bonus in secret, revealing it, and then roll the dice. The higher roller picks who takes the hit of the players. If their is a tie, the lowest player takes the hit.

Players can take 6 hits before they are out of the game.

In the solo play, people can attempt high score mode, or campaign mode.

In high score mode, players just attempt to destroy as many alien ships as they can before they are destroyed. Players roll two dice, and choose which one will be the shield and which will be the engineering. Engineering is basically your health, while shield affects what hits if at all.

In campaign mode you must defeat the pawn ships five times, each wave harder to destroy, and then must fight against the main enemy ship.

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

The game is a lot of fun. It's quick, easy to pick up and a simple and fast game to play. This would be a great game to take to conventions, and it doesn't take up to much space in your con bag!

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

My only concern is the multi-play is a little simple. It doesn't detract from the fun, but I would like a little more, maybe a cooperative play version of solo play. But that would possibly be an expansion? The idea is yours Derak if you want it!

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

This game fits anyone. It can be played by kids. Very well actually, and they love the attack style of multi-play. It's also a great game for conventions, parks, any place where you have a surface, and time to kill.

RATING!
6.9 out of 8. Keep in mind, this is a high rating for a micro game! Seriously. It has everything you want from a small bag in your hand game!

Keep an eye out for their Kickstarter when it launches! Totally worth it!
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Wed Sep 3, 2014 5:37 pm
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Strategicon Wrap Up: Review of "Worlds War One"

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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During Strategicon, as I will say for everyone to hear, I didn't get to do many things. Trying to push a many of my games, it makes it a little difficult to be able to play a lot of other people's games. Then add in trying to record some things, and pushing my tournament, running my tournament... Lets just say I was lucky to be able to eat.

That aside, my absolute favorite thing about this convention was my interactions with Jubilee Games, and their gem Worlds War One. Not only did I get a hands on demonstration with the game designer himself (a thing I think I love more then anything else in the world when it comes to gaming), but I got to participate in a huge multi-player version of the game with team play.

I think this review might be a little hard to sum up because I feel like a giddy school girl about this game, but I am going to do the best that I can.

Worlds War One is an amazing story about an alternative universe then ours, where prior to World War I, an alien event destroys the planet of Earth. From the shards of our planet, the survivors of a desolated world are forced to scrounge up as much alien technology as possible and re-purpose it for survival. In the process they take science fiction based technology and merge it with the only technology of the era. Steam.

The most powerful sects break apart from one another and rebuild their societies within our galaxy. United States of America, Germany, Asia, Russia, and Brittany. Though the strife they faced, and near death experiences have not stifled the feuds and turmoil that besieged these nations prior to the destruction of Earth. With tempers flared we, the players, enter into this galaxy, in charge of our factions. We sit on the precipice of a great war that will test our very resolve. But who will start the war, who was be destroyed, and who will win.

You like that flavor text above? I sure as hell love this world, and the game that exists in it. If I were Nicholas Timinskas I would be talking to a developer to make this universe into an immerse RPG world as well as his game. I don't like RPGs, but I would play it.

In the game players start the game with a faction (complete with their unique ability), a new home world (that produces a specific resource type), and a hand of cards. On a players turn, they discard down to ten cards, draw two, and collect their resources. After they have their resources and cards, they can attempt to trade for certain cards or resources with as many opponents as possible. If they don't want to trade, they can attack anyone, or do nothing for this phase. If they attack, then they will not be allowed to trade with that faction ever again.

After this phase players may build in their development phase. They can build ships, capture planets, recruit troops, or build developments. Ships and troops help protect planets, planets give resources, and developments allow you to effect what you can do on your turn, how you do things on your turn, and what other players can do. They are the bread and butter of messing with other players.

Players goal is to get to ten victory points, after it's accomplished all other nations will be in awe of your accomplishments, that they will fall in line.

You gain victory points, by producing ten resources in on turn, having three planets of different resource bases (per turn), trading with another player (both get a point), destroying a planet, or defending another players planet (Sometimes it pays to be a nice guy). I may have missed one thing, but I think you get the point. You can only gain the last victory point by attacking, or defending a planet from destruction.

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I do not know where to start. I was unlucky in the group play. I did not get the planets I could place, or the resources to place what I had. I was completely at a weakness compared to my other players. However I did get some cards that readily corrected my problems by taking away the costs for placing troops, and developments. This amazingly balanced this game for me, and helped me decide my strategy. I love a game where a person can adjust strategy based on the luck of the draw, have the worst draw and still succeed where others have failed.

I'd like to point out that I not only won that game but it became a very close conclusion with two other countries vying for the last point and me narrowly winning. SUCCESS!

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I don't feel like there anything for me to complain about this game. I tried to go through my memory for a part that I did not like, but after running through my mind, I can honestly not think about one.

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

People who want a well designed war game that has more skill, and luck then Risk or a Hex Based game. People who want to play in a well designed and produced setting. The game is really good for everyone. Hell the designer's own young daughter loves the game, and if I could get my son to be able to read the cards properly before throwing them down I know he would to!

RATING!
7.4 out of 8. It's an amazing game. I frankly don't know if this is the highest ranking I have given a game, but it deserves it. This game allowed me plenty of venues to be a jerk when ever I wanted it, but I was still able to piss off all the players and win. This game was my favorite game of Strategicon, and I am not kidding it is amazing.

If you haven't backed it yet on Kickstarter, and I have, you NEED TO DO IT NOW! (Only $40 for the game plus shipping, and you wont be disappointed!)
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Tue Sep 2, 2014 1:32 am
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Review of "GuildHall: Job Faire"

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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A friend of mine was trying to order a copy of Guildhall, but unfortunately due to the fact that Guildhall: Job Faire's box, except for the top, looks exactly like the Guild Hall box, he was shipped the wrong copy by the store. That being the case they wouldn't return it, so we played it all the same.

The game is simple, players start with a hand of 7 cards. On their turn players may use two actions on their turn. Actions are playing cards (and resolving their effect), turning in Collections, or redrawing cards. Lastly if you choose to play to cards, they can't be the same profession.

Cards in the game are, Robbers to take cards, Peddlers who trade cards for already played cards, Tax Collectors who grant victory points but forces you to move an already played card to another player, Bricklayers who allow you to basically redraw while also playing the bricklayer card down, hunters who trade played cards for discarded cards, and Scholars who let you take cards from the deck and lay them down.

You must have all of one profession, in every color to complete a set, and then you can trade sets for victory point cards.

First person to arrive at 20 wins.

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I liked a lot about this game. It's fun, and enjoyable, while at the same time not being to aggressive, or in your face. I mean there is a "little" in your face, but it's not to bad.

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I have to say, the problem of the box, and the unfortunate situation it placed my friend in, is very disappointing.

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

Designed for people who like Dominion, but don't want to have to randomly generate a list of cards to play, and then repack them later in the evening.

RATING!
6.9 out of 8. It's a good game. I'll give you that. It just feels a little repetative, and the deck size makes it a little hard to actually get a good shuffle, and can lead to large clumps being stuck at the bottom.



Now for something entirely different, for anyone who loves party games, keep in mind our reviewer, and amazing game designer has created an awesome game called Rough: The Card Game that is currently available for free print and play within this site! Check it out.

If you are interested in what is going to happen with this game feel free to email us at Info(at)MonkeyFingerGames(dot)com and we will let you know as anything happens!

Keep gaming!
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Mon Aug 4, 2014 6:00 am
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Review of "Going, Going, GONE!"

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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My friend came over last week and we decided to play a little gem called, Going, Going, GONE!. What happened afterward will blow... no.. no it's exactly what you would expect. It was still fun though.

Game is simple, you have 25 bucks in the form of cubes. there are five auction cups, and per every round an auctioneer counts to ten, while holding a large auction paddle (the thing they use to get attention). Players attempt to place their bets in the cups with the intent to get specific cards, but once the time is up the paddle thing slaps down on the cups.

Players are trying to get multiples of origin (country) or types (toys, comics, or cars), the more in a group you have the more you can resell them for later throughout the game.

The game is over when there is no more cards in the deck, and all players automatically must sell their collections. The person with the most money wins.

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I liked the simplicity, while at the same time increasing the speed at which you must act. there is a lot of strategy to this game though that I have still not learned all of it. I would definitely play it again.

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I didn't win, but that's not the games fault.

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

Families, and friends, people who have always wanted to be auctioneers, and people who hate buying things with non cube-like money.

RATING!
6.3 out of 8. I gave this a lower score, but not an incredibly low score. I liked it, I would play it again. Just give me a couple days to catch my breath from speaking to fast.



Now for something entirely different, for anyone who loves party games, keep in mind our reviewer, and amazing game designer has created an awesome game called Rough: The Card Game that is currently available for free print and play within this site! Check it out.

If you are interested in what is going to happen with this game feel free to email us at Info(at)MonkeyFingerGames(dot)com and we will let you know as anything happens!

Keep gaming!
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Fri Aug 1, 2014 6:00 am
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Review of "The Red Dragon Inn 3"

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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So I was very happy to pick up The Red Dragon Inn 3, after being sent several copies of the expansions, I couldn't help but check out the third expansion, especially since Uncle Phrenk was in it, after all I had gotten to know his niece so well.

What I played, was nothing like I had seen in the first version. This game was very different.

We had pixies, wolves, paladins, tinkerers and a brew master. Yikes.

Now must of the game play is exactly like the other sets but the characters are the difference. So if you want a game play break down, here it is from my prior review:

Players set up their play space, take their gold, and draw seven cards from their personal deck. All players start at 0 alcohol, and 20 fortitude. Place a drink on every body's board.

Players, on their turn, can choose to discard any cards from their hand, and then draw up to their hand limit. Then players play an action card, and then players buy another player a drink.

All the drinks in the deck are free, in so much that in theory you paid for them before the game started. If the drink deck runs out, you have to pay one gold from all players for another round (reshuffling the deck) before you get anymore drinks.

Players then at the end of their turn drink their next drink, which can effect both your fortitude, or your alcohol level.

Action cards is where the meat of the game lies, and each player has their own balance of cards in their deck. You can gamble, you can buy more drinks for more people, or you can effect players money and fortitude.

When you surpass your fortitude in alcohol, or run out of money, you are out of the game. Win by surviving the longest!


Now to the players. Each of these character's have special abiities.

The Paladin has a piaty chart, that is effected by the cards she plays, and sometimes effects the cards (a lot more then sometimes).

The Brewmaster has potions, and brews one each turn, he can hold one of those potions at a time, use them, or sell them to other players, if they want them. Also the Brewmaster has a lot of fun with the drinks.

The Pixie, besides being awesome and tricky, comes with a companion a wolf. Every turn the wolf's personality changes and the Pixie is either benefited, or hindered by it.

The Tinkerer has some super powerful cards, but because she tinkers, not all of them work. So she has a second deck that could increase, decrease or deactivate the cards that she plays.

Sounds cool you say, well there is more. In the game there are some awesome and even more interesting drinks to increase the fun of your game.

That being said this is worth your time and attention.

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I love the new characters, but I love Phrenk. His potions, and tossing of drinks made this game a lot of fun for me. I've played a lot of Red Dragon Inn recently, but Phrenk make the game feel like it was fresh and new!

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I felt that when the Tinkerer's cards were doubled by the gear deck, they became monsterous! But I guess it is very rare that it would occur, but it still hurt... a lot.

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

This is a fun game for almost any gamer, it's calm card management, and in game decisions entertain without polarizing. Unfortunately, due to the alcohol consumption though, I can not support this game for use with young children, but you can probably play it with your Tweens, if you have a serious talk before and after. You know, your job as a parent anyway...

RATING!
7.6 out of 8. When I played this game, I played it with 6 players, and added in two of the set one characters. It played awesomely, and was well balanced and fun. In the end it came down to Wizard Zot, and Wizgille the Tinkerer. Tinkerer though got lucky with her gear cards haha.



Now for something entirely different, for anyone who loves party games, keep in mind our reviewer, and amazing game designer has created an awesome game called Rough: The Card Game that is currently available for free print and play within this site! Check it out.

If you are interested in what is going to happen with this game feel free to email us at Info(at)MonkeyFingerGames(dot)com and we will let you know as anything happens!

Keep gaming!
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Wed Jul 30, 2014 6:00 am
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Comic-Con Game A Day (2014): Review of "Mai-Star"

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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Day Three, my legs are killing me, but I love this place and all the excitement! Did anyone else stop by Geek & Sundry's amazing set up? If you didn't you surely missed out on Loot Crate setting up there as well!

Day Three: Mai-Star

When I first heard that I was going to be playing Mai-Star, I was a bit dis-interested. I didn't want to play it, but that being said I was willing to give it a try at least.

Game play is simple, players start with one of six possible geisha, each with special abilities, and when the special abilities are applied. In addition geisha have three different skill styles to help them attract their guests.

Players start their turn with five cards in their hands. These cards are potential clients, or advertisers of your services. If you place a card down as a guest, you must have the required skill points, and you do not draw up.

If you put a card down as an advertiser, you gain the benefits of the advertiser, but you draw a card to replace the card.

Customers have a value to them, and once any player's hand is empty customer values are added up and assigned to the players.

After three rounds the player with the most points wins!

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

I really liked the art of the cards. Real simple, but beautiful!

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

To be honest there was a bit of confusion (with me only) about what abilities the advertisers had over what was granted from customers.

A little more design on the cards could have solved this, but it would not have been as streamlined.

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

People who know what a geisha is, and for people not worried about explaining to their child what a geisha is.

RATING!
5.9 out of 8. Not a great rating, but I would definitely recommend this game for a quick moment of fun while waiting for a panel to start!


Now for something entirely different, for anyone who loves party games, keep in mind our reviewer, and amazing game designer has created an awesome game called Rough: The Card Game that is currently available for free print and play within this site! Check it out.

If you are interested in what is going to happen with this game feel free to email us at Info(at)MonkeyFingerGames(dot)com and we will let you know as anything happens!

Keep gaming!
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Sat Jul 26, 2014 6:00 am
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Comic-Con Game A Day (2014): Review of "Fairy Tale"

Eric Bryan Seuthe II
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Back at Comic Con for our second annual "Game A Day" reviews! Games that would be a great addition to any bag during the grueling lines huge crowds, and buzzing attractions. Like last year these games will be games that you can take to an event like this, and will allow you to pass some time.

Day One: Fairy Tale

When I first heard of this game from a friend, I was hesitant. I didn't know what to make of the genre. I'm not usually a fan of the who fairy theme. That being said I decided to give it a try.

My next hurtle was the game mechanics. Half of the game is the card elimination from games like 7 Wonders.

Every turn players start with five cards pick one and pass the rest. This is done until they are all choosen. Players then play three of the five cards, one card at a time resolving its effect.

Some cards flip some cards, some unflips, some allow the play to draw more cards and some cards only effect final points.

This goes on for three rounds, then points are counted and winner has the most points.

WHAT DID I LIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

To be honest, even though half of the game is boring card selection, the strategy of it is kinda brilliant.

I also loved the art in the game. Very beautiful.

WHAT DID I DISLIKE ABOUT THE GAME:

To be honest, nothing really. The only flaw this game has is it's strength, in it over simplification of game play.

WHO IS THIS GAME DESIGNED FOR?

Players looking for a quick game to play between larger games. Strategic players, and lovers of the fantasy genre.

RATING!
6.8 out of 8. Pretty good rating for a game in a genre I don't love, with a mechanic I hate.


Now for something entirely different, for anyone who loves party games, keep in mind our reviewer, and amazing game designer has created an awesome game called Rough: The Card Game that is currently available for free print and play within this site! Check it out.

If you are interested in what is going to happen with this game feel free to email us at Info(at)MonkeyFingerGames(dot)com and we will let you know as anything happens!

Keep gaming!
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Thu Jul 24, 2014 6:00 am
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