ones upon a game

I am almost exclusively a solo gamer and look at the gaming scene seen through those eyes. I also literally like alliteration. TWITTER: @onesuponagame

Archive for Painting

1 , 2  Next »  

Recommend
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

The Index is a door to finding treasure in the dark...

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Over the past nearly three years, lots of articles, reviews, tips, images, etc. have appears on this blog... I was starting myself to get lost trying to find something!

So to remedy that I've created a new geeklist: Ones Upon A Game: Reviews, Mods, Images and Videos Index to refer to find the potentially helpful diamond in the rough.

I welcome you to subscribe to the list as a whole or just to games that are of interest to you... if such a thing is of interest to you.
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Thu Nov 9, 2017 3:24 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
51 
 Thumb up
3.25
 tip
 Hide

Digitally Painting Miniatures

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Welcome Geek Weekly Readers!

When making my counters for Silent Death: The Next Millennium Deluxe Edition (I Scream! You Scream! We All Scream for Silent Death!) I knew I was going to want ship images on them. While just technically the text would have been enough, this isn't wargaming in the 1980s anymore. I wanted bright, colorful, painted ships to distinguish the ship models.



But how? The artwork in the books is sketchy at best (see what I did there?) and of course copyrighted material. Since the game was 22 years old I didn't know if I'd be able to secure proper permission to use those and quite frankly, I wasn't optimistic at how they'd actually turn out.

So I turned to my other skill as a photographer and decided I'd photograph the actual miniatures from the game and then use tricks for colorizing old photographs to digitally paint the miniatures.

First I set up a green screen of sorts with a green piece of cardstock, poking a hold in the center and then threading one of the game's flight posts through the hole. Using a 70mm fixed length macro lens (photo nerd!) I set the camera on a tripod and focused on each ship from a top-down perspective. The lighting remained the same for each ship as did the focus distance, so the scale of larger ships to smaller ships would also remain the same. I took two shots of each ship (just in case) as well as a set of torpedoes and missiles.


Ship photograph, lifted from green-screen background and converted to greyscale.


Next off to Photoshop (with a quick stop in Lightroom for cropping and a little processing). Since I had green-screened each ship, it was a simple matter to remove the ship from its background and only have the ship image. Next I added a greyscale filter to remove all hint of color and only keep the tones and highlights and shadows. This would allow me to add color without it being tainted by color cast from the lighting.

The first step of adding the main ship color was easy. CTRL-click on the isolated ship layer to select just the ship. Then I added a solid color layer to the image with the color choice I wanted. Since the ship shape was already selected, the layer mask already restricts the color to that area. Finally changing the blend mode from "Normal" to "Overlay" and voila (or "walla" to those who mishear things), the shades of grey becomes shades of the chosen color and all the ship detail comes through.


Adding the main ship color.


Repeating this process for the other targeted areas of the ship is just as easy. Select an area, add a new color layer (though on these successive layers I set to "Color" blend mode vs. "Overlay") and you're now painting. The opacity of each layer remains 100% as the blend mode takes care of rendering the combinations of color. One thing I did different was on the canopy of each ship. For that when I selected the area, I did use that selection on the layer mask of the main ship color to black out (or hide) the body color from the canopy. Whereas the other areas of the ship might be "really" be decals or paint over the base color, the canopy would not have been painted over.

The cool thing is that the lighting from the photo still allows the texture and detail and highlights to come through on the "painted" model.

When all my layers were complete and I liked the scheme of the ship, I then flattened all the visible layers into a single new layer (CTRL-ALT-SHIFT-E). I have a plugin called Topaz Simplify (http://www.topazlabs.com/simplify) and it features an oil painting setting that produces a nice smooth look to images... simplifying their colors as the name suggests. I applied this to the merged image to create a painterly effect. However, it's a little drastic on its own and some of the details get lost in doing so. So the next step is to set the oil painting layer to a 50% opacity. This blends that layer into the photographic layers below to create a visual combination of art and detail that looks quite nice (IMO).


The "painted" photograph (left), the "Oil Painting" filter alone (center) and the final merged version (right).


Finally CTRL-ALT-SHIFT-E again to permanently combine everything into a single layer and the digital miniature painting is complete.





My final paint jobs...


When I'd completed all the ships, I combined those final 12 ship layers into a single Photoshop file to make sure they were all centered and stacked and then exported each image (with a transparent background) to its own PNG (portable network graphics) file and referenced each ship image in the data file spreadsheet used to construct the counters.



Another cool thing about this technique is that you can change the color if you want or make different paint schemes. Simply by changing the color of the solid color layer you can make the ship blue or purple or red, etc...

While this worked great for top-down wargame counters, the same process could be used to "paint" boardgame miniatures from the front and produce standees instead of using the in-game miniatures. Perhaps instead of painting all those stormtroopers in Star Wars: Imperial Assault!!!
Twitter Facebook
6 Comments
Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:47 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
33 
 Thumb up
5.00
 tip
 Hide

Foam Core: Not Just for Box Inserts...

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Before I got back into boardgaming, I kept foamcore and poster board around for photography backgrounds and bases, etc... Since then I've learned to make box inserts when the need arose.

But the other day as I was staring at all my bottles of craft paint (excellent for miniature painting of course!), I was starting to get lost trying to find a particular color when I needed it. I wrote the names of the colors on the tops with a Sharpie, but it still was a bit of a paint pain.

I looked on Amazon to see if they made some sort of storage for these.

And they do.

And they are astronomically priced. The best one I saw was nearly $60!!!

But wow I have all this foam core... perhaps I could build a better one?



And I think I did too.

Instead of making a slot for each bottle, I made cubbies that would hold six or four bottles. This allowed me to stagger the vertical supports to not only glue and pin them easily, but gave it extra stability too.

I made it to accommodate 100 bottles and was worried I would still not have enough room, but turns out I don't quite have 100...yet.

The box overall is about 85mm (including the back panel) deep and 390mm square (give or take 10mm). All from foam core I already had lying around. But had I bought the supplies it was one sheet of white for the inner box. One sheet of patterned decorative foam for the outer panels and a scrap from another sheet of black. So in all about $10 in materials depending on sales.

Still think I need to write the specific color names on the bottom of the bottles now, but I get the added benefit of a color preview this way.
Twitter Facebook
1 Comment
Wed Sep 27, 2017 3:53 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
25 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide

The Paint Awakens

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
So got a roll back before summer painting my miniatures for Star Wars: Imperial Assault (Imperial Assault Minis -- Updated Photos) but then vacation, a wedding, a farewell to a very dear furbaby, and other things just got in the way of continuing. Primed and ready to go, they just sat there. But I'm happy to say I was able to get back into the swing of things recently and have a new batch to share.

Still using the wonderful Ceramcoat paints thinned with floor acrylic. Cannot beat the quality and value of these things. However, during the Amazon Prime Days sale, I picked up a set of very cool Army Painter Quick Shade bottles to try some different shading possibilities and pleased to say they work great. I'd have never attempted to put 'blood' on the Wampa using paint, but the red stain just brought it out perfectly. Same with the lizard dudes. I used a green wash on their skin only to bring out the detail. The Quick Shades are like a gel, so they go where you want them only and stay put. Definitely worth a look.











Twitter Facebook
4 Comments
Mon Sep 18, 2017 8:10 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
31 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Imperial Assault Minis -- Updated Photos

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Didn't expect my post on painting the miniatures for Star Wars: Imperial Assault (With a Rebel Yell... I Painted More, More, More!) to get a shout out from the The Geek Weekly this week (Thank you very much!)... so figured I'd better update the photos and make them look a little better than the quick iPhone jobs with horrible lighting.

So without further ado...











Twitter Facebook
1 Comment
Thu Apr 13, 2017 5:13 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
33 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

With a Rebel Yell... I Painted More, More, More!

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
UPDATE: Imperial Assault Minis -- Updated Photos

Cannot believe it was just a week ago I posted about resuming painting my minis for Star Wars: Imperial Assault. To recap, it took two+ years to finally finish painting 13 miniatures (9 stormtroopers, 4 Imperial Guard). Given that pace, I should have completed about 10% of a single figure in the past week.

Oops!

I completed 10!!! Wowza. Just got on a roll and rediscovered the relaxation that this brings. I think the rut of 9 all white with black detail troops just really killed it. There is a plus to duplicate figures as you can set them all up and start painting all the like sections, etc... But there seems to be a fine line or a sweet spot to the right number. Nine was just too many.

But I'm happy to say (and spraining my shoulder patting myself on the back) that I was able to get all six of the base set heroes painted as well as the Luke/Vader included Ally packs (first two hits are free, am I right FFG?) and of course Han and Chewie couldn't be left out. Fortunately the hard part is done and now the most of a single figure is four, I believe. Four is a good number, because you can paint a section on each in order and by the time you're done with number four, the paint is dry enough on the first for a second coat.

Helped too that Joann was having a sale on the excellent Ceramcoat paints at 2-for-1. Picked up several niche colors for about $0.75 a bottle and while some will turn up their nose, the Ceramcoat paints are perfect for miniature painting on a budget. No need to overspend on boutique paints when you get the same quality for less. Spray primer with Krylon/Rustoleum white and protect when done with a Krylon Satin finish spray.

I've tried other brands for the craft paints, but for my money, Ceramcoat is the way to go. Smooth right out of the bottle, just a few drops of water/floor wax to thin it out (if necessary) and voila! Perfect paint. Finding the good number of color choices completely reduced the mixing hassle I used to have when I needed to repeat a color.

Wash is simply some black india ink mixed with water.

I have no plans of entering professional contests... but just enjoying the time relaxing and being creative with paints. And for a hobbyist, I don't think they are half bad (though the photos are a little rough).



Han & Chewie, Larry & Balky, Kip & Henry... Bosom Buddies to the end.



A little quality father/son time.





And our Heroes.


UPDATE: Imperial Assault Minis -- Updated Photos
Twitter Facebook
6 Comments
Mon Apr 10, 2017 8:25 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
24 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

1/10 Score and Three Months Ago...

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Funny how time flies. When I look back on something I did or wrote about or played and realize "WOW! it was that long ago?"

Two years and three months ago (nearly), I started painting my miniatures for Star Wars: Imperial Assault. Back when that now classic game was actually new. I'd just come off painting my (no longer owned) set for Galaxy Defenders the previous year and was all hepped up on the Star Wars crawl from Fantasy Flight. So played a couple of skirmish games and then got to work on them.



And then got burned out. I think it was a combination of the stormtroopers being mostly white and there being nine of them! But I just lost interest in the midst of painting them. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat. Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.

Where was I? Oh yeah.

So then I got busy with other aspects of gaming and modifications and content creation (and a little painting too), but those darn Stormtroopers and Imperial Guards just sat there in my paint area.

This weekend, I decided to open all my expansions for SW:IA and get them sorted and finally get around to playing it using the RedJak's Automated Emperor Variant. Then I remembered the unfinished. What to do.

I first planned to convert the whole thing to standees like I did with MERCS: Recon – Counter Threat, but didn't want to go through all that effort either. The game has assembled minis and unlike MERCS, they aren't hard to tell apart (except for the elite level if in play). So I grabbed a couple of sharpie markers and started coloring edges of the bases of the completely unpainted minis so they could be grouped appropriately. A grey set, a red set, and if needed, a black set. I'd just play with unpainted minis (and a few semi-painted ones).

Did all the ones from the expansions and then went over to my desk to get the unfinished ones... and it gave me pause. The Imperial Guards were essentially done. And I had about 1 1/2 Stormtroopers left to finish. laZy with a capital Z. Literally. (as an aside, I'd had them painted once in white and then tried to wash them in black for detail... oops! Muddied black mess all over them, so I had to again paint them).

So to make this long story even longer... I put on my big boy pants and just finished them. And actually enjoyed it again. They aren't the greatest, but they are table ready and distinct.



I painted trio sets of the Stormtroopers with Grey, Black, and Red bases and the Imperial Guards with Black and Grey. I am not a fan of "basing" miniatures at all. I think it makes them hideous for tabletop play. For painting competitions where the minis are simply statues, I think it looks great and adds to the overall effect. But for game use, it's a complete distraction.

"Look, my guy is running around with sand on his feet inside a corporate building."

"Where'd all this moss come from?"

"I've got a rock on my shoe!"

For both groups, I used gloss Mod-Podge on the armor areas to give them a contrasting shine to the satin spray finish.

And while I was in the garage spraying, I took Han, Chewie, and Darth Vader with me for a little primer in priming.

Those are now underway with Vader and Chewbacca done and ready for their bases to be painted. I'm thinking dark blue for allies and light blue for player characters.
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Mon Apr 3, 2017 6:15 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
31 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Slavecatchers, You've Been Pwned!

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Back in October 2014 or so (on my previous account), I showed my custom slavecatcher pawns for Freedom: The Underground Railroad by Academy Games, Inc.. I made these by taking pawns from an old wooden chess set, painting the body "Gunmetal Gray" and then painting the round ball on top the color to match each of the slavecatcher colors.

This was the final result...



I offered these up in the latest Jack Vasel Memorial Fund Auction (link) and am happy to say they sold for an amazing $25! Thank you!

The reason I put the originals up for sale is because I was working on some new ones using the Micro 3D printer (Boardgaming, 3D Printing, and the Micro 3D - a Ones Upon a Game Review) and am now ready to unveil them.



These I designed from scratch using Microsoft 3D Builder software included with Windows 10. I wanted to make the pedestal sort of like the column of a government building, so I created a tube and carved out sections from a rectangular block. Then on top of each I placed the proper geometric shape to match the shapes of each in the game.

After the printing was complete, I again painted the bases in the metallic gunmetal gray color, but only let that fill the inner niches of the columns. I painted the outsides of the columns with a metallic copper (for the money they made). Then of course each geometric was painted its corresponding color in the game itself.



While many of you may have the wooden blocks in the correct shape and color, those of us with the later edition only get cardboard counters to use. So this simple upgrade makes it easier to find the pawns and visualize their movement as you try to sneak your charges past them.

So to make this post more than just boasting, you too can get a set of these either for printing yourself or to ordering from a 3D printing service. As they are fairly small, printing should not cost too much. Then just paint them yourself (or order them in the proper colors).

The files are available for free on Thingiverse: http://bit.ly/2hoqAR1

Ordering them directly through Thingiverse will cost you just under $15 for the set in the USA (estimated to my address). Each pawn is about $0.55 and then "Includes $5 handling fee and $6.80 shipping". I make nothing from the sale of these, those are their charges only.

Hope you find these useful if you do decide to order them or print them yourself. Would love to see your results in game!
Twitter Facebook
2 Comments
Tue Dec 20, 2016 9:50 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
71 
 Thumb up
29.00
 tip
 Hide

Let the Good Times Roll

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
"Drivers, start your engines..."

Wow. I feel like I've just done 500 miles at Daytona (or watched them all at the very least). But after months of planning and weeks of execution, my Thunder Alley miniatures are done and on the track.

Whew!

When I last updated, I was in the midst of doing the body painting on the cars to set up an assembly line process of all the little details. The Gesso primer worked perfectly (Canvas Primer? Surely You Gesso!) and the pink paint went on with very little effort.

I did make one mistake in that I tried to do an ink wash in the channel around the car hood. This basically resulted in a bold black line that really didn't fit. Race cars start out all neat and clean and shiny, so this bit of detail didn't work. So this required a lot of overpainting of that area to reduce the effect. There really aren't a lot of "high areas" to do a standard wash and highlight effect like you can do on action figure type minis, so I went with just a solid body color and let the shape of the car create its own shadow detail.

So then the assembly line began:

168 wheels in metallic silver
168 tires in flat black
84 windscreens (front and back) x 3 effects per (top darker, bottom lighter, light effects).
42 spoilers (or what's left of them) in accent color.
42 touchups of body color where I "slipped"
42 bottoms and non-car side areas in "pavement" color.
84 headlights
84 taillights
(Listening to Mark Levin replay made the time pass by here!)


Details complete, ready for numbers and coating.


Murder By Numbers

Creating the numbers for the cars was going to be fun. I already knew I would use stickers (mailing label sheets) to create the numbers. But there was no way I was going to print them and then have to cut them out. I didn't want to use clear labels either, because they always show and how would I print "white" anyway. So I turned again to my Silhouette Cameo to do the heavy lifting here.

The roof area where I could put labels was 6x5mm so these numbers would not be large, but not too small either. However the side area didn't seem to be quite so tall, so I reduced them to about 3.6x3mm. I did what's called a kiss cut on the numbers (cut the sticker, but not the backing) and a full cut around each team's set to make sticker sheets. Unfortunately, this was not within the tolerances of the sticker paper and when they came off the cutter, the smaller numbers had all been pretty mangled. The larger numbers however we mostly intact. Back to the drawing board, I deleted all the smaller numbers, spaced each number of a car a little farther apart to prevent snagging and then duplicated each team to two sets of numbers so I'd have one as a backup. This, with some minor issues, worked fairly well.

Two teams have white numbers, two are yellow, two are black, and one is red. So for the colors, I took each team's sheet and used dry erase marker or highlighter to give it the color on the white label. The red didn't turn out as well and ended up a little orange, but that was only after it faded on the car, so... oh well. I also didn't notice that the teams had different font types for their numbers until after and they all ended up being the same, so... oh well.



Then came the tedious task of applying the numbers to the tops of each car. Using tweezers and an X-Acto knife for placement, I get the number roughly in position, adjust as needed and then press it down to the car (sticker paper!!!). When I finished the tops of all the cars, they just seemed to be missing something. Not having the numbers on the left them looking too empty. Because I'd made two sets of each number as a backup, I went ahead and tried out the larger roof numbers on the car doors (on one side). Darn, they looked that much better! So back to the Cameo and cut another set for each team, colored them, and went through all 42 cars and added numbers to both sides as well. If I'm going to do it, I might as well do it. Glad I did though, as they do look more finished.

Don't Forget Your Coat!

In the painting process I'd dropped cars more than once. I knew the resin was pretty durable, but there was no way I wasn't going to put a sealer and protector on these babies. For this purpose I chose ModPodge Gloss Coat for several reasons.

1. To keep the stickers down. As I learned making the Memoir '44 - Blocks That Work Better Than Miniatures the sticker paper won't always stay put, even when sprayed with a clear coat sealer. Mod Podge is a decoupage medium so it's a glue, sealer, and protector in one.

2. To seal the paint. After all that work, I don't want the paint to flake off from use.

3. I wanted the cars to shine. Normally I choose a matte finish, but a race car is going to be waxed until it glows, so I wanted to make sure the cars reflected the light appropriately and give the glass of the windscreens a glossy glassy appearance.

Mod Podge goes on white like glue, but then dries completely clear and doesn't yellow with time. I just painted on a heavy coat to the top and sides with a brush and let it sit for 20 minutes before touching. I could do extra coats, but I plan to hit them afterwards (all over) with a regular spray sealer too -- as Mod Podge is not waterproof.

42 Car Pickup

Of course I just had to test the durability, so in a stroke of genius (actually a stroke of sheer klutziness) I decided it would be fun to bump the valentine box holding the miniatures at the paint station, completely knocking all of them to the floor.

They all survived just fine.

On the Track

Here's a few shots of the car now on the track. I look forward to finally playing Thunder Alley again especially with the new Thunder Alley: Expansion Tracks now that my mission is completed.





Postmortem - Lessons Learned

Thanks for reading this far. I hope you've enjoyed the entire process and series. Here's some final random thoughts about what I learned in this.

1. Wish I'd taken better care making the molds. I'd have prepped the cars a little more, filling in some void areas. I'd also figure out a way to make the bottom of each car a little more uniform.

2. Figure out why the casts were different. Many have weak spoilers, some distorted areas, etc. I would have cast more and picked out the best ones, but the molds were breaking down after 12 uses.

3. Perhaps try the polymer clay in the molds. However, I'd played with something else in polymer clay and dropped it and it broke in half, so that made me rethink this. Though perhaps the Mod Podge and paint would help with that.

4. Very happy still with using craft paints vs. dedicated miniatures paint. The price difference cannot be ignored and for the few mini paints I've used, the quality difference is almost none (if at all). There is a difference in the brand of paints however. Folk Art tends to be very thick. Apple Barrel as I recall is ok. But my preferred brand is Ceramcoat. It's already at a good consistent consistency and I only thin a little with my floorwax water mixture. All of the above are simply acrylic paints.

5. Since I painted the bottoms anyway, I wish I'd primed in white. White tends to make the top colors brighter and it is covered easier by lighter colors.

6. Very happy that my sharing of this actually inspired Jeff Horger, one of the designers of the game, to want to do the same. That's pretty darn cool in my book when that happens.



7. I would love to see GMT Games add a P-500 of car miniatures. Given that they are all the same in terms of form, it seems like a set of 42 miniatures should be easy to mass produce. If they wanted to be really fancy, they could cast them in each of the seven colors to make a set. Wouldn't hurt for a P-500 attempt. If there weren't enough interested parties, then it just wouldn't make the cut.

8. That said, I'm shocked someone else hasn't produced a set of cars at this scale for the game (and others). I looked for other alternatives, including 3D printing, but found nothing at a reasonable size or cost.

9. These came to about $0.36 each to make. I think about $9 for the mold making material. I made several iterations and wasted a bit, so let's say $6 spent on the molds. 11 of 32 oz of the resin = $6.18. The car I cloned was I think $3.50. So $15.69 all totalled for 44 cars made = $0.36 each. Then of course, painting, etc... but those I have on hand already.


Conclusion

So while these are not the greatest miniatures in the world (some look good, some look odd), I'm thrilled that I was able to pull off my vision from start to finish and for the most part achieved what I wanted. This also was a good test for molding and casting in general and gave me a new craft in my rather small arsenal. And I can look at them and for now at least know that my copy of the game is very unique.

Thanks again for all your support and encouragement along the way. It's been fun.

Full Series Index

All the entries for this series.

1. Send in the Clones - DIY Thunder Alley Miniatures - Part I
2. I'm Certainly No Earl Scheib, But I Don't Charge As Much Either
3. Slow and Steady Wins the... (ahem) Race?
4. Canvas Primer? Surely You Gesso!
5. Let the Good Times Roll
Twitter Facebook
9 Comments
Tue Feb 16, 2016 5:22 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
18 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Canvas Primer? Surely You Gesso!

Kevin L. Kitchens
United States
Gainesville
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Snowflakes Melt
badge
Snowflakes Melt
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I mentioned yesterday (Slow and Steady Wins the... (ahem) Race?) that painting yellow over my grey primer took too many coats to keep the grey from showing through. The other cars are darker paint and only takes 2-3, but I still have pink to do. It was suggested that I just use white primer over the grey, but since I'd already painted out small details already, I didn't want to do completely re-prime the whole car either.

So last night, I remembered a discussion in the 1 Player guild Miniatures Painting Thread where we'd briefly discussed using Gesso to prime miniatures. Gesso typically comes in white or black and is used by artists to prime their canvases before a painting. It was not new to me that some use this to prime miniatures as well, but my previous experience was less than stellar.

I'd watched a video showing how to use the product which explained that gesso shrinks as it dries. So if you put it on too thin, it will recede into the low places and leave higher areas uncovered. They did a time lapse of a mini drying and it sure enough showed the primer doing just that. Their solution was to make sure you put in on "thick" to overcome this. So I did and it didn't and I was then left with a nasty globby mess, losing much detail on my Gears of War: The Board Game creatures. I had those things soaking in Simple Green for weeks and it still never all came off, even with a good scrub.

On the painting thread others mentioned never having this issue using gesso, so in light of the idea to white prime the cars receiving a lighter paint and a hope that the "sugGESSOtion" to use gesso in general was a good one, I decided to retry. Hey, I'd spent $8.99 (less 40%) on that bottle just sitting there, better to use it!

And I'm happy to report that simply using a brush and painting on the gesso primer as if were paint appears to have worked quite well. Sitting overnight, the primer has held quite nicely and will hopefully give me a good foundation for applying the lighter pink color later tonight. If it goes on splotchy, it might not be mixed well enough. My bottle says to shake or stir well and I gave it a vigorous shaking before using. It is thicker than paint and will build up on your brush faster, so make sure to wash the brush well afterwards (water cleanup is just fine).


From grey headed to pink, with a brief stopover in white.


Full Series Index

All the entries for this series.

1. Send in the Clones - DIY Thunder Alley Miniatures - Part I
2. I'm Certainly No Earl Scheib, But I Don't Charge As Much Either
3. Slow and Steady Wins the... (ahem) Race?
4. Canvas Primer? Surely You Gesso!
5. Let the Good Times Roll
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Wed Feb 10, 2016 1:59 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls

1 , 2  Next »  

Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.