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Tasty Minstrel Games was started in early 2009, and has become a favorite game publisher for many people.

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Coin Age "copy"

Michael Mindes
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So... I was just going through some emails and I got a message from a Coin Age backer. That pointed me to a project for a "game" called Wallet Battles.

At first I thought, wow this looks familiar...

Then I read about how the "game" was played, and that it was based on a Civil War coin game, and I realized that if the mechanics for games like Risk and Monopoly are outdated...

I realized that there was nothing "legally" wrong, and I saw that my methodology for releasing micro games would be copied faster than I thought would happen...

Anyways the bottom line is this:

#1) The game is different. Very different, I wouldn't personally consider it a game based on the rules that I read.
#2) I have seen my ideas and methods for using Kickstarter copied, reused, and reworked many times over.

So, I have no problem other than the potential confusion about TMG's potential involvement. Now, the first line of text in the project is:

"We are not affiliated with Coin Age. TMG, Michael Mindes, and Adam P. McIver have no involvement with this product or campaign."

So, I am satisfied. I would like to ask you to not hassle the guy. I hope that he is successful in what he is trying to accomplish. I had people hassle me about a game that was similar to another game only in that you stack wooden shapes. I had to back out of that because of it, and I don't want that to happen to somebody else.

The only thing I worry about is that if it was copied without further thought going into it that he might run into trouble. The microgame projects that I am doing only work for me at fairly large scales.

But, that is not my problem in this case.

Here are Adam's thoughts on it:

http://boardgamegeek.com/article/14422359#14422359
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Fri Jan 3, 2014 6:11 pm
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Not every game should be published...

Michael Mindes
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I have gained many friends while publishing board games. Many of whom are small publishers trying to make their own mark. I like them, they are good people. They do things right and are being successful, but not successful "enough".

I ask the question, "why?"

Sure, it took time for me to become established, and that has been accomplished on the back of many great games, transparency, and consistent hard work. And it has taken a lot of TIME!

But I see them doing the right things. So, again I ask the question, "why?"

Then I hear the answer dropped into conversations hear and there. And my heart sinks... To put it politely, the games aren't incredible. Sometimes, I hear that they are bad.

Which brings me to the topic of this post:

Don't Publish Everything

I know it is exciting to make your own game and see it start to work. The rules are working, the pieces make sense, there are even decisions to make. The decisions might even be interesting, and the theme fantastic.

Everything is coming together.

So, you start the process to publish the game.

Kickstarter is horrible and bad because there is no gatekeeper...

What was that? Oh, I can hear the anti-Kickstarter folks coming now to get their say in... Well, in some senses they are correct. With many games that are Kickstarted, there is no gatekeeper in the old sense of the word.

Don't go down this path Michael, you will never recover...

Right right, so bottom line - gatekeepers at many companies fail and still publish crap. You personally don't need to Kickstart any game that you don't want or don't have 100% confidence in. Available choice for the consumer is a good thing for the consumer.

Right, where was I? Yes...

Don't Publish Everything

Just because your game works doesn't mean it is interesting. Find out from large pools of alpha gamers what they think of your game.

Develop "taste" for a certain type of game. Seth Jaffee has incredible taste for euro games. Michael Mindes has good (maybe incredible?) taste for dice games. DomCrap from NorthStar Games has incredible taste for party games. Steve Jackson has incredible taste for games that feature tongue-in-cheek geek humor (see Munchkin and much of SJ Games line).

Stefan Feld is probably the most trusted designer right now to make a great euro game.

If you have good taste for a certain type of game, and people start to recognize that, then you are on your way toward success. Utilize your taste to understand why a game is better than others in its class. Or to know why it is unique and cool.

Maybe you are thinking... "Wow, Michael, that is not very helpful at all."

I Know, It Is Hard To Quantify

It is very hard to quantify. When I started TMG, I knew that Seth had fantastic taste for Euro games. That is why he is our developer. That is why it is almost 100% up to him what TMG publishes in that arena and how much work needs to be put into those games.

His taste in this area has proven to be amazing, and over time it is verified through how people like games like Homesteaders, Belfort, Eminent Domain, Kings of Air and Steam, Il Vecchio, Ground Floor, and so forth.

I think I have good taste for games in general (as evidenced by how many I dislike, meaning the ones I like must be VERY good). But of course, acting on an unverified taste can be damaging when you publish something that sucks.

However, my taste in dice games is being verified. Martian Dice has been very well received. Dungeon Roll is in the hands of folks and becoming well received. I saw the great things about each game, and was the main developer on both to make the good things about the game shine.

I think Train of Thought, For The Win, and Jab are fantastic games. It is clear that not enough people are in agreement. So, my taste for smaller filler/party games is not great, unless they are dice games.

Learn Your Tastes Through Trial And Error

Where you have good taste will often line up with the type of game that you really tend to enjoy. If you have any good taste at all.

Over time, if you are publishing games, then you need to see where your strengths are and focus on those areas. Always focus on your strengths.

And again, just because the rules work and it is technically a game, that doesn't mean that it is something you should publish.

Because you really don't want to become established as a publisher that has bad taste.

Cheers!

Remember, I am starting a new game company on a budget of $999. Reviewing this information is helping me remember how to start a game publishing company (Mindes Style) while having the opportunity to teach what I have learned to you.

You can sign up for email updates at Paradise Game Labs. We would love to have you along for the ride.
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Wed Aug 21, 2013 3:00 pm
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Find An Audience, Become Friends, Rule The World...

Michael Mindes
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In the previous blog post, I talked about epidemics how to help your game spread like an epidemic and what it takes to get backers on Kickstarter.

It Is All About Audience

I didn't call it out heavily in that post, but having an audience and a relationship with that audience is a HUGE factor here. It was there just under the surface.

Jeff Bezos (founder and CEO of Amazon) has said, "Real estate is the key cost of physical retailers. That's why there's the old saw: location, location, location."

To this, I, Michael Mindes, have a variation, "Potential backers on Kickstarter is the key limitation of a crowdfunding based creative company. That's why there is the new saw: audience, audience, audience."

Backers drive initial results on Kickstarter, which drives buzz, which drives additional backers, which drives total funding results, which drives results in retail... At each step, the better the results are, the greater the increase in your audience.

After the Dungeon Roll Kickstarter, when I asked in the survey if backers would like to become TMG email subscribers we got an additional 3,553 email subscribers. That is a 32.6% opt-in rate out of all of the backers. That is with at least 15% of backers having already been on the list.

Wow, the next time we Kickstart a game that is similar to Dungeon Roll, we will have such a HUGE head start when compared to last time. Our first email about Dungeon Roll went to 8,140 email subscribers. Today there are over 15,000, quite the growth in 5 months.

People Aren't Numbers

You will not here me say "email blast" and every time that I hear somebody say it I cringe. Why you might ask?

Because, a marketing email is not something that you just BLAST as somebody. Like you are shooting as much as you can at as many people as you can trying to get as much to hit as possible. It isn't a process of sending every bit of promotional material and hoping that something in there convinces somebody to buy.

For me, it is about building a relationship with all of those people. That way, when you have something to say or something to promote, they are willing to listen. They are willing to give it a chance.

Sure, TMG might have over 15,000 email subscribers, but it is the relationship with those individual people that matters. Obviously, we cannot have a personal relationship with 15,000 people.

So, what we do is show people what we are all about and let them choose if they like that or not. So, we share how we do business. We share what is going on in the company. We pull back the curtain.

We strive to provide as many services and as much value as possible. For that, we hope that we are well liked enough that people on average will continue to buy our games.

RELATIONSHIP

That is what it is all about. Without it, it doesn't matter how big of an email list you have. Plenty of companies have email lists ten times the size of TMG's, but they don't get results. That is because they don't have a relationship.

They don't ask for permission. They don't continue to earn that permission.

In today's world where there is more good free information than you could ever consumer on the Internet, it is the attention of an audience which brings the most value.

So, go out there and EARN that attention...

Rule The World

I don't know pinky...

Remember, I am starting a new game company on a budget of $999. Reviewing this information is helping me remember how to start a game publishing company (Mindes Style) while having the opportunity to teach what I have learned to you.

You can sign up for email updates at Paradise Game Labs. We would love to have you along for the ride.
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Tue Aug 13, 2013 3:00 pm
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How and Why a game sells...

Michael Mindes
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As previously mentioned, I am starting a new game company on a budget of $999.

You can sign up for email updates at Paradise Game Labs.

Since, this game company will not have the resources of TMG to assist it, then I have again thought about How and Why games sell.

Game Sales In General

Games, in general sell because they are fun, well liked, and people know/understand the rules. Why do people buy Monopoly? Because the "know" how to play and remember it being fun (even if that fun is nostalgic and it sucks now).

The nostalgic fun benefit shows itself with Risk, Stratego, and Magic: The Gathering (particularly through people that come back to M:TG). Obviously, we cannot benefit from nostalgic fun and a built in base of people that know how to play a game we will release.

Therefore, they need to have fun immediately and consistently enough that they want to play a lot of the time.

Regular Folks vs. Alpha Gamers

If you are on BGG and reading this blog, then you are certainly an alpha gamer. The majority of the fans of TMG are alpha gamers. There are pros/cons to attracting both the regular folks and the alpha gamers.

Alpha Gamer Pros:
* Will gladly read and learn the rules of the game from a rulebook.
* Are more likely to take a chance on your game.
* Have greater influence on what games are played.
* Respond well to expansions.

Alpha Game Cons:
* Lose interest in a game faster, especially if they don't find anything special about it.

Thus, if you graph the influx and outflux of alpha gamers playing your game it will look like a spike (unless you REALLY catch on and that is rare). And you will hope that they will spread the game to as many "regular folks" as possible before they get bored.

Regular Folks Pros:
* Are impressed by good games.
* Play a smaller number of games, thus if yours is one of them, then yours is very likely to be played by them regularly.

Regular Folks Cons:
* Hate reading rules.
* Need to know a game and like it before buying it.

This knowledge about alpha gamers and regular folks coupled with a knowledge of game sales in general, means that we need to know what impedes immediate fun, and remove those from any game design.

What Impedes Immediate Fun?

Learning rules, misunderstanding rules, game flow, game speed, over analysis, lack of table talk, lack of laughter.

Nothing sucks more than learning the rules to an epic game like Twilight Imperium or Eclipse. Except maybe playing them if you don't want to devote several hours to a game. Or find the game flow to be problematic (like in TI3).

What Allows More Fun For More People Faster?

If you want a game to have commercial success. REAL commercial success (not just several thousand sales)... The kind of success you can build a career on, then it is important for as many people to have fun as quickly as possible.

Cards Against Humanity is the poster child for this.

To accomplish this, you need to support more players, be easier to learn game (video rules anybody?), faster gameplay, lower price, encourage table talk, and provide reasons to play again.

As a publisher, you would LOVE for your game to spread like an epidemic, so there is looking at that too...

Next time, we will look a little at how epidemics spread, pre-selling on Kickstarter, and how to build a relationship with that initial audience that can get you started.

Remember, I am starting a new game company on a budget of $999.

You can sign up for email updates at Paradise Game Labs.
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Wed Jul 31, 2013 3:00 pm
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Publishing For The One

Michael Mindes
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I am not talking about Neo here, but a specific individual.

Do not apologize to everybody else for making a game that they do not like. Just make something for that one specific individual.

As it turns out, there are a lot of people just like that individual, you just need to find them and get them to buy and play your games.

Most of our games will not appeal to an average person, as opposed to the average BGG user.

Martian Dice is specifically published for a person that:

*Loves dice.
*Dislikes most dice games.
*Is ok with randomness, as long as there are meaningful decisions and everybody suffers from the same randomness.
*Desires another game that they can enjoy while playing with children or un-converted gamers.

I think we have accomplished that specific goal. Now we just hope that we can reach enough of those type of people.
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Mon Oct 3, 2011 1:00 pm
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Strategy Without Tactics and Tactics Without Strategy

Michael Mindes
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"Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat." -Sun Tzu

If you decide to become a board game publisher, then I hope you do not have 1 game that you will release and "see how it does". That will just be the noise before defeat. Then again, if you go into publishing board games like the same way I did (with grand strategic plans), then you are on the slowest route to victory. Which in the world of creative works and economic realities might as well also be the slow route to defeat.

In a simplified version of war (like Chess or Go), you have one opponent. There are 3 end options... Win, Lose or Draw. A zero-sum game. In the world of board game publishing, you have multiple opponents and there is room for multiple winners and multiple losers. While you could sell a game at a profit, if you are not keeping up to speed with the best, then you will not have an ultimately successful company.

That is a road to being at best a 1 title flash in the pan.

So, what is the strategy?

For Tasty Minstrel Games, we have many strategies or strategic goals. The most prominent of which revolves around the branding of the company as a publisher which only produces great games. Thus far, I think our record is exemplary with a 7-0 success rate. Yes, I am biased, etc, but I believe there are fans that will agree.

Even that strategic goal is derivative of the primary 2 strategic goals:

1. To be able to publish games in a low-risk environment which we have created and utilize as a competitive advantage.
2. To be able to release multiple titles up to our quality standard in any given year to continually search for the black swan hit. Examples being Catan, Ticket to Ride, and Dominion.

For a long time, we had developed complimentary strategies and a very small number of actual tactics for accomplishing this. For a long time, Tasty Minstrel Games had skated by on this alone.

And, what are the tactics?

The tactics are the use of an email list, online website/webstore, retailer deals/promotions, convention attendance/planning, box ads, paper catalogs in boxes, and so forth.

When TMG started, we just had the email list. Since then we have been actively adding more and more tactics for the purpose of accomplishing our strategic goals.

Our strategic goals stay the same, and as we think of or discover new potential tactics, then we test them, and see if we want to continue using those tactics. Thinking, testing, and measuring results are key to determining what tactics you should be using.

Start with your core strategy and desires. Build your tactics around that.

Knowing what your core strategic desires and goals are will fundamentally shape what your organization will look like. Since the core strategic goals of TMG are to reduce risk and produce lots of games without having their quality suffer, it is likely that I would devote more resources to game design, game development, and customer communication.

These are the places where I would be willing to invest time and money now for future dividends later. Any other aspect of the operation should be immediately profitable for us to do at all.

Conclusion

It is essential that you know where you want to go and what your ultimate strategic goals are. Without knowing this, if you start publishing, then you will blow in the wind with ongoing changes.

After that, figure out one tactic that you want to concentrate on at the beginning, and continually think, test, and analyze results for the adding of additional tactics.

As Tasty Minstrel Games becomes stronger as a publisher, I notice that the tactics that we implement work better and better. Or, maybe it is the other way around.

Anyways, cheers!
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Mon Sep 26, 2011 1:00 pm
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Conventional Wisdom - Yes This Is About Conventions

Michael Mindes
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The conventional wisdom of the board game industry (as represented mostly by GAMA advice) is that convention attendance is essential to the success of any new board game publisher. As with most conventions, I like to challenge, explore, and test against the idea myself.

When Tasty Minstrel Games started, we had 2 games that we launched, Homesteaders and Terra Prime. Neither of which comfortably fit into the mold of what would sell well at a convention. Or at least this is what I thought, and certainly not at the conventions popularly championed of Origins and GenCon.

When I looked at it, I saw the expense of going to GenCon. $1,000 for an entrepreneur booth, $700 for 2 flights, $800-900 for a hotel, food, and transportation of games to and from the convention. Yikes! With little knowledge running around about the company and our games, I compared it to supporting multiple smaller conventions.

Smaller Conventions

For the $3,000 I would have expected to spend on GenCon, I could instead support 50 smaller conventions by sending out games for their libraries and to be given away. Support those 50 and have money left over.

Looking at it this way, I decided to provide support for the smaller and more intimate conventions rather than go to GenCon. I believe this worked out well, as Geekway to the West provided a good boost to Homesteaders, and BGG.con provided a good boost to both Terra Prime and Homesteaders.

When To Do Larger Conventions?

First, I must say that after attending GenCon, it looks like a good showing at GenCon can propel a game forward toward greatness or at least great sales. This worked well for Ascension: Deckbuilding Game and I hope that it works well for Martian Dice.

Tasty Minstrel Games attended GenCon for the first time ever in 2011. And despite air shipping costs, dryage fees that look like extortion (cost to get pallets from Indianapolis into the convention center), flights for 3 people, booth costs, and hotel; the show was profitable for us to be at. I mean profitable in the sense that we made actual dollars, add onto that the marketing and relationship building benefits and it was quite a success.

We decided to go to GenCon in 2011 partially as a test. I didn't want to consistently be missing on a great opportunity to build the business of TMG. Also, I felt like we had a good number of games which would allow us to keep people at our booth which would attract more people due to the social proof of crowds.

It is interesting to understand how social proof works and then observe it working at a convention. One example is where 2-3 people would crowd around Seth to learn about Eminent Domain. As he would continue, the crowd would often grow to 6-8 people. Another example is the staff uniforms and staff quantity of the larger publishers. Regardless of the number of people actively checking out wares at the booths of Fantasy Flight Games, Mayfair Games, or Catalyst Game Labs it always looked like they were busy. At least on the rare occasions I got out of the booth to use the restroom.

BACK ON TRACK - I would say that a convention like GenCon makes absolute sense if you have a game which can be taught quickly and involves GenCon beneficial attributes (like Dice, RPGs, Cool Art, Minis, etc). It also makes more sense if you have more titles to sell than just one.

Conclusion

You will need to be well prepared for a convention the size of GenCon if you want to have a successful showing. It also pays to plan for next year right after the show if you did have a good show, that way your great ideas can be acted upon instead of being lost to the vagaries of time and memory.

I know that Tasty Minstrel Games will be at GenCon in 2012 with either double or triple the space, a larger catalog of games, and a better plan for having a great show. After next year's con, maybe I will share some of the secrets.
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Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:00 pm
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The Difficultly and Importance of Staying Focused

Michael Mindes
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If you are anything like myself and many of my gamer friends, then you are probably interested in just about anything. Combine this with the guts to test cross over possibilities and you have a recipe for certain excitement. It will either be exciting good or exciting bad.

*Good because it worked and the awesomeness flows like milk and honey in the promised land.
*Bad because it didn't work and time/money was wasted going down a path that was secondary to the goal of being a profitable board game publisher.

Sometime in April of 2011, I committed to devoting "business building" time to actual revenue producing endeavors for Tasty Minstrel Games. This meant I would only be working on what would provide revenue now, prepare for near-future revenue, and deliver on revenue already received. This meant I would have to forgo my often fanciful and wishful thinking about big deals and related businesses.

I like to screw around too much, and this would keep me on track. As a result of this commitment, at least 2 major things were accomplished:

*The Eminent Domain preview nights.
*The super-fast concept, design, development, art, and production schedule for Martian Dice. Which went from a desire to have a good and simple dice game in time for GenCon, into air shipping copies in time for GenCon within 4 months total!

Yes, I thought that we could make a better dice game than Steve Jackson Games and their Zombie Dice. Especially with an understanding of how well Zombie Dice had been selling. Now, I do not expect Martian Dice to sell as well, but I figured that it had low enough risk and enough hit potential.

Straying Focus

For me, it is tempting to look at the success of others and say, "Hey, I could do that!" That is the short path that leads me away from what I have already built and the success that is already coming from my efforts. Recently (just before GenCon), my focus was straying.

I again commit to only chasing after revenue and branding positive endeavors for Tasty Minstrel Games, when I am doing TMG work. There is so much to be done before even my new short term goals for TMG are reached.

Conclusion

Maintaining focus will allow you to get more effective work done faster. This will allow you more time for all other aspects of life, and possibly more time for your focused work.

Right now, my focus is to build the revenues and profits of Tasty Minstrel Games so that in the near future I can hire people to improve and work the systems revolving around TMG.

Hopefully, one of those people that I can hire will be myself!

When you find that you have become unfocused, then what do you do to get back on track?
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Mon Aug 22, 2011 1:00 pm
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Don't Quit Your Day Job... Ever?

Michael Mindes
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I have a love/hate relationship with being a board game publisher. I love the work, the results, and everything about it. I hate that I cannot do it full time.

I have responsibilities, and I assume that you do to. I need to provide food, shelter, clothing, and so forth for 5 people. There is to be no putting that at risk in exchange to work in an area I am more passionate about. Not to mention that a new board game publisher would likely fail under the weight of the costs associated with just ONE employee.

Tasty Minstrel Games is at a point where in 2011 it should be profitable. Thanks to the strong success of Eminent Domain and Belfort. Along with the expected success of Martian Dice, JAB: Realtime Boxing, Homesteaders, Train of Thought and Ground Floor.

While this should make TMG profitable from day one, meaning all investment could be withdrawn and still have cash/inventory. It does not mean that it could yet realistically support the weight of employees. Maybe I am overly cautious on this front...

Anyways, if you pay somebody a decent salary, then you could have instead produced 2 games in a given year. At a "C" level position (CEO, CTO, COO, etc) then you probably could have produced 3-4 additional games.

It is hard enough to produce the revenues required to cover costs and be profitable. It is harder still to be able to do that, cover labor costs, and still allow for enough profit to invest into new titles.

Remember, companies like Days of Wonder, Fantasy Flight, and Mayfair have the strength of a catalog of perennial games which are always producing revenue and profits for them.

So When Do You Leave Your Day Job?

I don't know yet...
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Mon Aug 15, 2011 2:00 pm
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