$30.00

BoardGameGeek News

To submit news, a designer diary, outrageous rumors, or other material, please contact BGG News editor W. Eric Martin via email – wericmartin AT gmail.com

Archive for W. Eric Martin

[1]  Prev «  2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6  Next »  [187]

Recommend
84 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Automata Comes to Noir, Witches Come to America's Aid, and Port Royal Comes to the U.S.

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• People have been asking for months, if not years, when Alexander Pfister's Port Royal will be released in the U.S., and for nearly as long German publisher Pegasus Spiele has answered that someone had licensed the game and any announcements are in the hands of that licensor.

Now Steve Jackson Games has revealed itself as that licensor and announced an August 2017 release date for its edition of the game, and while I can understand a publisher wanting to put its own spin on a game — doing something to make sure the game fits in their catalog — I'm baffled as to why SJG has gone with that cover art while keeping the Klemens Franz artwork inside the hood. Seems like a mismatch, but I haven't been in business publishing games for nearly forty years, so maybe I'm overlooking something that SJG knows better.

• Want to playtest a Caverna expansion? Alex Wilber, who in August 2016 uploaded files on BGG containing fourteen (!) new races for use in Caverna other than the default dwarves, says that he's now working with Lookout Games on an expansion tentatively planned for release in the first half of 2018. For details on how to get involved, head to this post on BGG; for details on the expansion itself, you must wait.

• Along similar lines, Cheapass Games has posted a rough version of Rochi, a gambling game from James Ernest and Sonia Lyris that will be featured in Lyris' next fantasy novel. Here's a short description from Cheapass: "Rochi is a gambling game for 2-8 players, played with a Tarot-style deck with six suits of different sizes. It's a new deck design for us, and it's a whole new way to think about how gambling games should work. There is no betting, very little bluffing, and six different pots!"

The window to provide playtesting feedback closed on March 31, 2017, but if you want to download the current rules and components, you can still try the game ahead of its release later in 2017.

• In mid-2017, Atlas Games will release Craig Stockwell's Witches of the Revolution, a 1-4 player cooperative deck-building game in which the player witches must play a decisive role in aiding the colonies during the American Revolution. We recorded an overview of the game during the 2017 GAMA Trade Show if you want to see it in action:




• Near the end of 2017, Level 99 Games plans to release Automata NOIR, a new version of D. Brad Talton, Jr.'s NOIR that features the world and characters from the Automata comic created by Penny Arcade's Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins. The game will still be based on hidden identities and deduction, with updated versions of the "Killer vs. Inspector", "Hitman vs. Sleuth", and "Spy Tag" game modes, along with two new game modes: "Buddy Cop" and "Dragnet".


Twitter Facebook
15 Comments
Sat Apr 15, 2017 7:05 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
94 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Reliving the Middle Ages in Twenty Minutes, and Reading the Path of Light and Shadow

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• German publisher Hans im Glück has (at least) two items on its release schedule for SPIEL 2017 in October, with one of them being an expansion for The Voyages of Marco Polo from designers Simone Luciani and Daniele Tascini. Moritz Brunnhofer, the HiG representative I spoke with, gave no details other than that an expansion is coming, but BGG users are speculating on what it might contain should you care to join them.

The other item coming from HiG is a Marc André design tentatively titled Middle Ages, with this game bearing the distinctive micro-action hallmark of earlier André designs such as Splendor, Barony, and Sail Away.

In this game for 2-4 players, each player has a set of eight tiles that represent their city. A deck of cards is shuffled, then six cards laid out in a row, with each card showing one or two symbols that match seven of the city tiles. (The eighth tile is a graveyard of sorts, and no one puts anything in there willingly!) On a turn, a player takes one of the cards in the row, paying for each card they skip, then they add this card to their city, earning a benefit based on the matching tile where the card is placed. Some cards give you money (which equals points at the end of the game), some let you attack everyone else, some give you defense against attacks, some pull cards from the graveyard, and some give you more buying tokens so that you can take the card you want and not whatever is at the front of the line.

Players take twelve cards total, then the game ends and players score points for having the most of a card type for each of the seven types as well as a diversity bonus for having lots of different types of cards. Majority vs. variety is the basic tug-of-war at play in many games, and it works well here, with the desire for variety having you look inward while the need for a majority has you look at everyone else — not to mention the need for defense.

I played Middle Ages twice, and I wish that Brunnhofer hadn't told me the designer's name as I'm sure that I could have guessed it given how streamlined and bite-sized everything was. One explored aspect of the game during those plays is that the city tiles are double-sided, so once you have experience with side A, you can try side B to relearn the game all over again. Brunnhofer stressed that players use all side A or side B tiles and don't mix-and-match them, but once you take the game home, you can do as you like, of course. Just don't expect Hans im Glück to answer any rule questions about your illicit set-up...

Travis R. Chance, co-designer of Path of Light and Shadow from Indie Boards & Cards with Nick Little and Jonathan Gilmour, has started posting a series of articles about the origins of the game, its central choice between being cruel or merciful (which drives your interaction with those you recruit from the provinces), how culling works, and the nature of the nomadic Hordes of Zurd, which "drag with them the Mother Stone, a massive black rock that fell from the sky before their time".

Tasty Minstrel Games has picked up Jesse Li's The Flow of History, first published by Moaideas Game Design in 2016, with a Kickstarter funding campaign planned for April 2017. Jesse Li stopped by the BGG booth at SPIEL 2016, where we recorded an overview of this card-based civilization-building game.

• TMG is also releasing a new edition of Hisashi Hayashi's Okey Dokey, a cooperative card game first released by the designer's OKAZU Brand in which players try to assemble a music festival by placing the fifty performers in the ten available columns.
Twitter Facebook
13 Comments
Fri Apr 14, 2017 3:26 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
74 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Attract Visitors to Your Bear Park, and Be the Best Demon Lord in Halloween

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• Dutch publisher Quined Games has announced the 20th title in its Master Print Edition series: Angelo de Maio's 2-4 player miniatures game Halloween, which will have a Kickstarter funding campaign ahead of its expected October 2017 release date. Here's a short description:

Quote:
It's Halloween — time to haunt poor unfortunate humans who think the holisday is all fun and games, but wait until you unleash ghosts upon this little town. Use your knowledge and wit to summon ghosts, move them around town, scare people, and even fight other ghosts because only one demon lord can boast of being the scariest demon lord of them all.

Halloween is a tactical game for 2 to 4 players in which you take on the role of a demon lord that controls the many ghosts on the board. Carefully plan your actions through a unique mechanism that allows you to manage multiple ghosts to try to outwit your opponents. Summon ghosts, move them round the board, fight other ghosts, or use one of the numerous action cards that can give you great tactical advantage.

• We missed out on featuring Upper Deck Entertainment in our 2017 GAMA Trade Show coverage as we never heard back following our request for news of upcoming titles — it's hard to feature what you don't know! — but UDE has a number of titles in the works for 2017, including Dungeon Draft, a card-drafting game from Ascension designer Justin Gary. The description is meager so far, but it's enough to set the table for the game: "Over the course of multiple rounds, players draft heroes and weapons, then use them to defeat monsters and complete quests in an effort to earn the most victory points. As with any good drafting game, the choice between helping yourself or hindering an opponent is always in play..."

Dread Draw, from Ryan Miller, is a strategy card game of "press-your-luck competitive fortune-telling" for 2-5 players due out in July 2017 that bears this short description: "The game pits players against each other trying to summon cards. As play escalates, players run the risk of elimination. Will you be the last one standing? Will fortune smile on you?"

Miller is also the designer of Pack of Lies, a noir fantasy originally announced at Gen Con 2015 for release in 2016 and now bumped to a 2017 release. Two other original titles announced in 2016 and due out in 2017 are Mike Elliott's RPS-style The Dingo Ate The Baby and Richard Launius and Pete Shirey's Shark Island, for which BGG shot an overview video at Origins 2016.




Quest for the Antidote is a 2-6 player game bearing this description and no other details:

Quote:
You and the other players have been poisoned by the mad king! Armed with only your wits and a list of antidote ingredients, you must battle the wilds, monsters, and your fellow players to be the first to return to the apothecary with the items you need.

Each turn in Quest for the Antidote, players roll dice to move their pawns around the board in search for the specific ingredients that are scattered across the land. Monsters of varying difficulty block your path, but each victorious die roll may yield powerful items.

Do not dally as time is of the essence. Every move and roll of the dice will deplete your fading life in your quest for the antidote!

In terms of its licensed games, in addition to the previously announced Legendary: Buffy The Vampire Slayer, due for release at Gen Con 2017, and the already released Legendary: Noir, Upper Deck will release Legendary: X-Men in June 2017, with this being a large set featuring nothing but X-Men-related heroes.

Mayfair Games has announced a trio of games with a June 30, 2017 U.S. release date: a new edition of Uwe Rosenberg's Glass Road (with minor tweaks, I believe, to prevent the infinite cycling that could rarely happen in the original release); a new edition of Darwin Bromley and Tom Wham's Iron Dragon, this being a fantasy-based take on Empire Builder's pick-up-and-deliver game system; and Phil Walker-Harding's Bärenpark, a tile-laying game that, yes, will have the same German name on both the German and U.S. editions of the game. Consider this an experiment from Mayfair Games.

The latter two games will debut at the 2017 Origins Game Fair ahead of their retail release, while Glass Road will be available only for demo games at that show, not for purchase.

I played Bärenpark at PAX East 2017 and thought that I had written something about it, but a search of the archives shows that my mind has tricked itself once again. Clever, that mind — just not in the right way!

In the game, players each run their own bear park, and they want to build it up from scratch to be as point-rich as possible. To do so, you want to have the first tile of the various types — forests, tunnels, icy pools, etc. — since audiences are easily jaded, and the more that they've seen something, the fewer points you'll score. If you group certain tiles together, you'll score bonus points for creating something so awesome that newspapers far and wide will include your park in their annual destination guides.



Four turns into Bärenpark on a prototype at PAX East 2017


In terms of the actual gameplay, each player starts with a 4x4 tile that has a few construction symbols on it — a wheelbarrow, a cement mixer, a manhole, and men at work — along with a single tile. On a turn, you place a tile from your reserve somewhere on your board, then take one tile from the common reserve for each symbol you cover; covering a wheelbarrow nets you a small common tile (covering 1-3 spaces) worth no points, while covering a cement mixer gets you one of the four basic types (covering 4 spaces) worth a few points. Cover an excavator, and you get one of the sweet pentomino tiles. Cover the workers, and you're rewarded with a new 4x4 board, with each player taking at most three such boards.

As soon as you cover all but the manhole cover, you cap that tile with a manhole worth 16 points minus however many other manholes have already been covered. Yes, park visitors even tire of admiring manhole covers, the louts.

Once someone has finished covering their fourth board, players collect bonus points based on how well they met the randomly chosen scoring categories, similar to the Lookout Games title Isle of Skye. Then everyone tallies their points and gives the winner a bear hug.



My final park in Bärenpark
Twitter Facebook
12 Comments
Thu Apr 13, 2017 6:05 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
115 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Evolution Goes Deep and Ticket to Ride Returns to Germany

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
North Star Games has two items in the works related to its popular Evolution board game. First, as noted on the iOS Board Game blog, North Star is working on a digital version of the game and is taking sign-ups for alpha testers of a desktop-only version through April 22, 2017 (with tablet and phone versions to come). North Star had a test version of digital Evolution at PAX East in March 2017, and I played a few rounds, finding the system quite intuitive, despite me having next-to-no digital gaming experience.

Second, former North Star employee Nick Bentley is working on a standalone spinoff game that bears the working title Evolution: The Oceans. As Bentley explains in his introduction to the game, Evolution players have long been interested in exploring deep waters with their card-created creatures, but (1) North Star first wanted to create expansions for the existing game, which it did with Flight and Climate, and (2) they couldn't figure out a good way to integrate oceanic creatures with land-based ones given that their evolutionary traits would not mesh in any meaningful way.

After leaving North Star, however, Bentley crossed paths with marine biologist Brian O’Neill, and they melded minds to figure out what Evolution: The Oceans should be look should such a game exist. They now have a licensing agreement with North Star to make the game happen and plan to deliver the design to the publisher by Gen Con 2017 in August so that North Star can develop it ahead of a Kickstarter in Q2 2018 and a scheduled release at Gen Con 2018. Time to start that convention preview!

Zug um Zug: Deutschland, first released in 2012 in Germany and Austria by Days of Wonder as a replacement for Alan R. Moon's Ticket to Ride: Märklin, is finally coming to the U.S. and the rest of Europe. What's more, Ticket to Ride: Germany will include the extra tickets and the passenger tokens from the Deutschland 1902 expansion for Zug um Zug: Deutschland.

To clarify, Ticket to Ride: Märklin used the basic Ticket to Ride formula of collecting cards to claim train routes and score tickets when you connect certain cities. To that vanilla cake, it added a passenger mechanism in which three times during the game you could move a passenger token along routes that you had claimed to collect city tokens which decreased in value as more passengers visited a city. The mechanism added tension to the base game since you wanted to build up long connected routes in order to hit as many cities as possible, but at the risk of having others move passengers first and taking more valuable tokens. The drawback was that you had to set up stacks of wobbly tokens all over the board prior to play.

Zug um Zug: Deutschland stripped out the passenger mechanism and left only the map of Germany and accompanying tickets. Deutschland 1902 then added passengers back in, but in a new way. At the start of the game, players added one colored passenger to most cities and up to five in others. Whenever a player places a route on the board, they claim a passenger from the two cities that form the endpoints for that route (assuming that the passengers have not already been claimed). At the end of the game, whoever has the most passengers of each of the six colors scores 20 points for that color; whoever has the secondmost passengers in a color scores 10 points. Whoever has the most points at the end of the game wins.

The ticket count of Ticket to Ride: Germany doesn't seem to exactly match that of the Deutschland base game and expansion, but it's close. In any case, Ticket to Ride: Germany is scheduled to be available in June 2017 in Europe and to debut at Gen Con 2017 in August, with a €44/$50 MSRP.

Twitter Facebook
35 Comments
Wed Apr 12, 2017 4:05 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
76 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Game Preview: Reworld, or Shape the Ships into Shipshape Order

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
In addition to the previously announced Frogriders and Ghost Catchers (preview videos here and here), German publisher eggertspiele has a number of titles in various stages of development, including a new Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling title for SPIEL 2017 that's all about terraforming a non-Martian planet for fun and profit.

In Reworld, 2-4 players each attempt to terraform a newly discovered planet on their own, and to do that they need to use terrabots to establish new cities and shuttles to deliver materials that will populate those locations. I've played the prototype once — entirely bungling my terraforming efforts in the process, mind you — so let me give you a rundown of this typically tactical eggertspiele design that will challenge you to think from front to back in a new way.

Over five rounds, players fill the five levels of their spaceship with tiles featuring terrabots, shuttles, material vessels, and satellites. Each round, twenty of these tiles are placed at random around the perimeter of a large mother ship, and each player receives a hand of 7-13 cards depending on the number of players. On a turn, a player can play one or more cards to claim a tile following these rules:

• If neither tile adjacent to the desired tile has been claimed, the player can lay down any card next to this tile, claim it, then place it in the leftmost space of the level of their spaceship that matches the number of the card played. If you play a 4, for example, then you must place that tile in the leftmost position of your spaceship's fourth level.

• If one tile adjacent to the desired tile has been claimed, then you must lay down a card of the same number used to claim that previous tile or any two cards of your choice (with those two cards thus serving as a joker). Whatever number is topmost on the card(s) played indicates the level of your spaceship on which you must place this tile.

• If both tiles adjacent to the desired tile have been claimed and the cards used to claim them show the same number, then you do the same as described above. If the cards have different numbers, however — e.g., 1 and 3 — then you must lay down the same two numbers (1 and 3), one matching number and any other two cards, or any four cards. You then place this tile on your spaceship in the same manner previously desired.


While she stares at her hand, I stare at mine (artwork and components not final)



Once everyone has no cards in hand or cannot play further, the round ends. Any remaining tiles are thrown away, then you reset the board and deal out a new hand of cards. After five rounds, players now deploy these tiles onto the new planet, taking turns to deploy 1-3 of the leftmost tiles from the spaceship level of their choice to create their personal terraformed world. If you deploy a terrabot, which are labeled A-E, you start a new city with this letter or extend an existing city of yours. Material vessels, which come in five colors, can be delivered to the planet's surface only if attached to shuttles, and each city can have vessels of only a single color. Satellites provide bonus scoring when added to a city. Shuttles and satellites can also be used for shields to protect your newborn planet.

Players earn points during the first half of the game for picking up terrabots and having cards left in hand. (You'd rather acquire tiles, of course, but at least you receive a compensatory point for each card wasted.) During the second half, players score for deploying satellites and for meeting targets set at the start of the game, e.g. being the first to have a city with eight tiles in it, have a city of each letter, empty a level on your spaceship, have a certain number of shields, score a certain number of points, etc.

Once all the spaceships are empty, players score their final points for how well they've developed each city and their shields in comparison with their fellow terraformers. Whoever scores the most points wins!


A poor layout of tiles; don't try this at home — or in space! (artwork and components not final)



At first blush, Reworld might remind you of programming games such as RoboRally, Space Alert, Colt Express, but the game challenge is more along the lines of you loading a handful of moving trucks. Whatever you place into the truck first is likely going to come out last, so if you start a level with an E terrabot, you need to keep in mind that (a) you won't reach that terrabot until you deploy everything to its left first and (b) you can't place anything to the left of this terrabot into your E city unless you have another E terrabot somewhere else on your spaceship that will be deployed first.

As everyone knows, you want to load the bedframes, mattresses and sheets last, but sometimes you can't help it. In Reworld, Kramer and Kiesling have baited the hook with more points for loading terrabots in the early rounds — and sometimes you just don't have the cards for anything else — so you take a terrabot anyway and leave worries about planting it until later.

Everyone cursed their hand of cards at one point or another during our demo game, partly because others occupied spaces that would require you to pay cards you didn't have (thus upping your costs) and partly because you didn't want to place tile X on level Y. You squirmed and screwed up your nose, sometimes grabbing a second-best tile and sometimes just plopping a tile on the level anyway and letting that worry meter ratchet up a little higher.

Satellites push players in different directions — I want a lot of red materials; she wants a long city; he wants shields — which then has us valuing tiles in different ways, but they're all jumbled together anyway, so we're often going to have to step on toes or overpay to get what we want. The goal tokens counter this push toward diversity as we're all competing for these bonus points, while simultaneously knowing that we can't grab them all, so we just need to make sure that we do certain things one turn faster than everyone else in order to take more bonuses than others.

While getting the rules rundown, I missed the line about shuttles being required to move materials to the planet. I thought shuttles just let you bring down more materials in one go, with you deploying slower without them, but no, your materials will just be jettisoned into space if you can't dock them shuttleside. Don't make this same mistake; fight for shuttles early and often, while still keeping in mind that if you have nothing good to shutt, then they're not worth that much in the long run unless you want to end up with a bazillion shields protecting a terramalformed planet...
Twitter Facebook
4 Comments
Tue Apr 11, 2017 1:00 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
88 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide

Crowdfunding Round-up: Impulsively Rise to Peak Apocalypse

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• Here's an odd situation to lead off this crowdfunding round-up: Polish publisher Czacha Games, which released a Polish edition of Carl Chudyk's Impulse in 2016 with fan-created art by Zak Eidsvoog, is now releasing an English-language edition of their version of the game, along with two expansions — All Your Base and Brake for Launch — that have never before appeared in print. (KS link)

Original publisher Asmadi Games is dropping Impulse from their line and won't release the expansions in a style compatible with the first edition of the game, according to Asmadi owner Chris Cieslik, who later wrote, "The point at which it made sense to start considering printing the expansion is right about when they decided to go forward with a Polish version of the game with the fan-made artwork. It made it no longer worth pursuing for us, so we let them do what they wanted to." Did the publication of fan artwork on its own kill sales of the original release? Or was it the appearance of a non-English version with this artwork, similar to how people lavish praise on the Polish edition of Castles of Mad King Ludwig and complain that Bézier Games won't release a version with this artwork. Perhaps there's a lesson in here for publishers about what licensees are allowed to do with new editions of games...

• Speaking of Asmadi Games, they're on KS with a project of their own: Invasion of the Garden Gnomes, a revamped version of Reiner Knizia's majorities-based card game Vampire that now contains 100% fewer vampires — so maybe I should have gone with "devamped" instead. (KS link)

• Another new title emerging from old is Hardback, a "pre-quill" to Tim Fowers' deck-building, word-building game Paperback, and that pun makes sense only when you look closer at the game to discover that you're playing as 19th century author Penelope Quill. In any case, this game, co-designed with Jeff Beck, is both playable on its own and an expansion for Paperback, and like most titles from Fowers Games, it will not be available in regular retail stores. (KS link)

• Tobias Gohrbandt and Heiko Günther's Peak Oil from Spanish publisher 2Tomatoes puts you in charge of a petroleum corporation that's trying to squeeze out as much profit as possible from the world's dwindling supply of oil, then plowing that money into new industries to exit the oil market while the getting is good. (KS link) We shot an overview video of the game while at the Festival International des Jeux in Cannes, France if you want to see the game in more detail:




• Worker placement and resource management combine in King's Champion from Jason Washburn and Talon Strikes Studios, a 60-90 minute two-player game that's all about improving your knights so that you can outjoust the other guy. (KS link)

• Before you can joust, though, you might need to visit Smiths of Winterforge so that you can have the right tools in hand. This design by Dylan Shearer, Aaron Sparke, Rule & Make, and Table Tyrant Games pits dwarven guilds against one another to get components to complete crafting contracts. (KS link)

• Mike Gnade of Rock Manor Games is following up his 2016 debut title Brass Empire with Maximum Apocalypse, a "cooperative roguelike adventure game for 1-6 players" in which everyone needs to avoid monsters, collect gas, and drive to safety before another scenario begins. (KS link)

• What do you get when you a cross a Norseman with a pirate? Vikingar, a joke that makes sense only when said aloud in the right way, in addition to being a plundering/fighting/trading game from Jean-Thomas Rioux, Étienne Rioux, and JackBro Playful Creation that will have you throwing runes on the way to Valhalla. (KS link)

• Emanuele Santandrea's latest title from his VentoNuovo Games is Bloody Monday, which recreates the Sept. 7, 1812 Battle of Borodino, which the publisher dubs "the single bloodiest day of the entire Napoleonic Wars period". (KS link)

• Are you looking for a game that contains "an educational workbook about stellar evolution and the history and mythology of constellations"? If so, then Constellations from Dante Lauretta, Ian Zang, and Xtronaut Enterprises might be your thing. Word is that it also contains a game in which you collect different star types to complete constellations, which will then tile the night sky. (KS link)

• "This could be the hottest dice/worker placement game in 2017!" That teaser pull-quote leads off the KS project for Rise to Nobility from Vojkan Krstevski and Final Frontier Games, and while that tagline must appeal to some — given this project's $124k take in its first five days — I feel somewhat like we've fallen down a hole if that jargon is meant to appeal to people at large. Then I look above at some of the descriptions I've used to describe these games, and I see that I'm in that same hole. How about this instead? "Become a lord and take your seat at the Stone Council of Caveborn." (KS link)



Editor's note: Please don't post links to other Kickstarter projects in the comments section. Write to me via the email address in the header, and I'll consider them for inclusion in a future crowdfunding round-up. Thanks! —WEM
Twitter Facebook
16 Comments
Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:05 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
64 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: A Renewed Five-Year Mission for WizKids, and A Second One Deck Dungeon

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• U.S. publisher WizKids has announced a "renewed multi-year license with CBS Consumer Products", and accompanying that announcement comes word of a wave of Star Trek items, such as card packs and faction packs for Star Trek: Attack Wing, with the former debuting in mid-2017 and the latter coming in Q3 2017. As for what they are:

Quote:
Each Star Trek: Attack Wing Card Pack will include cards, token sheets, and the necessary dial connector pieces. Most of these cards and tokens will be brand new content, while some cards in each pack will be reworded versions of existing cards. Each Star Trek: Attack Wing Card Pack now has a lower price point than previous expansion pack releases, and will point to at least one existing release for players to acquire the correct ship sculpt, if they don't already own a copy.

Each Star Trek: Attack Wing Faction Pack will include four pre-painted plastic ships with cards, token sheets, dial connector pieces, bases, and pegs to accompany them. Many of the cards and tokens in these faction packs will be brand new and will allow a player to field a never-before-seen fleet from right out of the box.

For those who want to paint their own minis for Attack Wing, in mid-2017 WizKids will launch Star Trek: Deep Cuts Unpainted Miniatures, and for those who want different painted minis from those included in Attack Wing there's Star Trek Tactics: Series IV, which I believe is the fourth series of ships for the Star Trek HeroClix line. From the press release: "Play with fan-favorite classic factions such as the Federation, Klingon, Romulan, Dominion, and Borg as well as the all new Xindi and Andorian factions! Unlike previous Star Trek Tactics sets, all ship sculpts are used only once within the set! That's right, Series IV brings 28 unique dials and sculpts to the Milky Way!" Who knew that WizKids was producing dials and sculpts with materials acquired outside the Milky Way?! Seems cost prohibitive, but perhaps that's why I write about games instead of manufacturing them.



Unpainted minis


The HeroClix line will also see the release of Star Trek HeroClix Away Team: The Original Series, with this Q4 2017 release featuring "the most iconic characters from Star Trek: The Original Series with Kirk, Spock, Uhura, and more".

Finally, in August 2017 Star Trek: Frontiers will get bigger with the release of The Return of Khan Expansion Set, which boosts the player count to five and which features "Khan's Jem'Hadar Battle Cruiser, 'The Pequod', and a new playable ship — the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-A", according to WizKids, which describes this expansion as equivalent in size as The Lost Legion expansion for Mage Knight Board Game.

• U.S. publisher Asmadi Games has announced a Q3 2017 release date for One Deck Dungeon: Forest of Shadows, a standalone expansion for the 2016 release One Deck Dungeon from Asmadi owner Chris Cieslik.

As with the original game, One Deck Dungeon: Forest of Shadows is a dungeon delve, with each card in the deck depicting both an obstacle to overcome and the potential rewards for doing so. This release, which will hit Kickstarter in April 2017, contains new heroes, new dungeons, new perils, new foes, and new mechanisms (Poison and event Perils), and its heroes and dungeons are compatible with the original game should you want to combine them or mix-and-match in some way.

Asmadi Games plans to talk about this title, along with Mottainai: Wutai Mountain, Invasion of the Garden Gnomes, and Innovation Deluxe, during a Twitch presentation on Thursday, April 6 at 13:00 EDT (GMT -4).

Renegade Game Studios has announced many titles for release in 2017, and while we briefly covered J. Alex Kevern's Sentient in a video overview of five upcoming Renegade titles at the 2017 GAMA Trade Show, but I thought I'd highlight it here as well, mostly so that I can show off the striking cover by Chris Ostrowski. As for the game, here's an overview of the setting and gameplay:

Quote:
The next great technological revolution is here. Sentient robots for information, transportation, industry — all at our fingertips. Building them is now the easy part. Programming them has proven to be more complicated. A handful of companies have emerged claiming to pull it off, but only one will win out. Your mission is clear: Procure valuable bots and plug them into your network. They'll have an effect on your systems. Anticipate it correctly, program your bots effectively, and attract the right investors to win and lead the sentient revolution.

In Sentient, players are tasked with choosing from available robots to program in their factory. Each robot that is added modifies your board and attracts the interest of investors for your company. Program your bots efficiently and collect the support of your patrons to build the most formidable operation.


Twitter Facebook
15 Comments
Thu Apr 6, 2017 1:10 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
121 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Going Deep with Leder Games, Gardening in Japan, and Moving Brass to New Cities

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• U.S. publisher Leder Games has announced what might be considered a spiritual successor to 2016's Vast: The Crystal Caverns, a cave-crawling adventure for 1-5 players in which each player had unique attributes and goals. Now you get to try something similar in the stars in Samuel Bailey's Deep: Enemy Frontier:

Quote:
For a thousand years the Empire of Humanity has grown, conquered, and ruled with strength and order, but now resources grow scarce and unrest mutters under the thin veneer of tranquility. Out in the distant void, ancient enemies sense weakness and band together to bring down those who defeated them and sent them running. Humanity's only hope is to reach once more for the furthest stars, discover new worlds rich with resources, and build an new Empire that can survive for another thousand years.

Deep: Enemy Frontier is a highly asymmetric sci-fi strategy game for 2-4 players. Each player takes a unique role during a period of intense conflict in our quadrant of the galaxy. The Empire seeks to shore up its weaknesses and once more establish itself as the dominant force in the galaxy. The Usurper threatens to bring the Empire down from within and establish a free and open society ruled by the people rather than a dictator. The Rival sweeps in from the remote edges of the galaxy, a coalition of aliens burning with revenge against an Empire that conquered and harried them over the past hundreds of years. The Captain throws himself out into the stars, to explore and have grand adventures, his exploits broadcast to the entire Empire; perhaps his fame will lead him one day to sit upon the throne of all humanity...

Osprey Games has been doing a fantastic job with their revamped editions of older games — Odin's Ravens, The King Is Dead, Escape from Colditz, The Ravens of Thri Sahashri, and more — and Samurai Gardener is the latest example, this being a new edition of Hisashi Hayashi's Edo Yashiki, first released by his own OKAZU Brand in 2013. Okay, all we have so far is a cover, but it's impressive. As for the gameplay, here's a summary:

Quote:
Samurai Gardener is a tile-laying game with an historical Japanese theme in which players try to construct as impressive gardens as possible.

Each card consists of six sections of several types of areas (pond, floor, garden, etc.). Players lay the cards side by side or overlapping in order to create long rows of the same area type. Each round, rows/columns of the same area type are awarded points, and the player with the most points when all building cards are depleted wins.

If you want to see the gameplay in practice, here's an overview video of the original game that I recorded in 2014:



• In January 2016, Gavan Brown of Roxley Games announced that it had signed a deal with Martin Wallace to release a new version of his 2007 design Brass. What's more, Roxley was developing a new map with Wallace that would essentially create a second game from the Brass game system.

Roxley has now revealed some details of both games, along with two of the most eye-catching covers of the modern day — which each cover working beautifully on its own while pairing to make something bigger. Brass has been renamed Brass: Lancashire, and aside from new artwork and components, Roxley has made these small-ish changes to the rules:

—The virtual link rules between Birkenhead have been removed.
—The three-player experience has been brought closer to the ideal experience of four players by shortening each half of the game by one round and tuning the deck slightly to ensure a consistent experience.
—Two-player rules have been created and are playable without the need for an alternate board.
—The level 1 cotton mill is now worth 5 VP to make it slightly less terrible.

"Slightly less terrible" — that phrase always look great in marketing copy!

Brass: Birmingham adds a new action to the game (Scout) and three new industry types (brewery, manufactured goods, pottery), while requiring beer for certain things to happen in town: "Brewing has become a fundamental part of the culture in Birmingham. You must now sell your product through traders located around the edges of the board. Each of these traders is looking for a specific type of good each game. To sell cotton, pottery, or manufactured goods to these traders, you must also "grease the wheels of industry" by consuming beer. For example, a level 1 cotton mill requires one beer to flip. As an incentive to sell early, the first player to sell to a trader receives free beer."

Roxley plans to launch a Kickstarter funding campaign for both titles on April 17, 2017.


Twitter Facebook
24 Comments
Wed Apr 5, 2017 1:00 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
78 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Crowdfunding Round-up: Stop Greedy Cytosis to Dragoon a Dicey Thief Warp

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• Designer John Coveyou of Genius Games has previously released games titled Covalence: A Molecule Building Game, Ion: A Compound Building Game, Virulence: An Infectious Card Game, and Peptide: A Protein Building Game. You might think that he designs for a certain niche, and you would be right, with his latest offering being Cytosis: A Cell Biology Game, a worker placement game that takes place inside a human cell. (KS link)

Arclight and Japanime Games are publishing Sword Art Online Board Game: Sword of Fellows, an adaption of the Sword Art Online anime by designer Seiji Kanai with players rolling dice and working together to take down enemies. (KS link)

• Another co-op game looking for funding is DiverCity from Maxime Tardif and Sphere Games, with the scuba-diving players trying to save species on a coral reef to ensure diversity (wink, wink) in undersea environments. (KS link)

Dragoon got a lot of love at Gen Con 2016, and now designers Jake Given, Zach Given, and Jonathan Ritter-Roderick are raising funds for a new printing of the base game as well as Dragoon: The Rogue and Barbarian Expansion, which adds two new human characters to the game and allows for play with up to six at the table. (KS link)

• The driving mission behind Restoration Games is to take well-loved games from past decades, remove all of the bad stuff about their designs that nostalgia has made you forget, then return them to market. They plan to debut three titles at Gen Con 2017 in August: Indulgence (previously Dragonmaster), Downforce (previously Daytona 500 and many other iterations), and Stop Thief!, with this latter title being the only one to hit Kickstarter. The funny thing about this design is that the most loved element of the game — at least by me, who played it frequently with my family — was the electronic noise gizmo, and a large percentage of the population now carries something far more advanced than that electronic noise gizmo on them at all times. (KS link)




• Another nostalgic blast in game form is Greedy Claw Crane Game from David Sheppard and Twitch Factory, with players rolling dice to "claw" toys from the 6x6 field that creates the floor of the claw machine. Dig in to grab the toys you want for the best sets. (KS link)

Warp Speed from Andresakis, Cimino, Mamouris, Seretis and JAM Games is a new design, but the look of it strikes the same 1980s note as Lazer Ryderz from Greater Than Games, another 2017 release. In Warp Speed, players use their spaceships to sweep asteroids from play(!), discover planets, and complete objectives in order to score fame. (KS link)

• A similar-sounding project is Zebulon: Galactic Control from Jacob Hardin, Brandon Monahan, and Apocto Games as the description highlights your efforts to zip through space on a modular board while picking up fuel, battling others, and completing missions. (KS link)

Magmeda Monsters designer André Forsblom of Rapid Leaf Productions says that he first started working on this two-player card-driven battle game when he was twelve, which means that at age 25 he's spent more than half his life with this game bopping around his head. Now he's trying to bring it to life to share with others. (KS link)

• Frequent Kickstarter participant John Clowdus of Small Box Games has a trio of projects underway on a ten-day project that celebrates the ten-year anniversary of SBG. Hard to believe that a decade has passed since he started releasing tiny self-published games, but we're staring at the proof in front of us, so I should start believing. The three games in question — Cartouche Dynasties, Hemloch: Dark Promenade, and Seii Daiymo — are all updated and revised versions of earlier SBG releases. (KS link)

• Another frequent Kickstarter inhabitant — this being designer Scott Almes — has created an uncomfortable-sounding environment for himself this time: Dicey Peaks from Calliope Games, with these peaks being of the Himalayan variety and with players needing to roll their way to the top of the mountain before they freeze or have their arms yanked off by a yeti. (KS link)

• Frank West's The City of Kings from publisher The City of Games is a cooperative tactical roleplaying board game for 1-4 players that features tons of choices:

Quote:
You start by choosing one of seven stories, then select your hero, with each of the six heroes featuring twelve unique skills and nine customizable stats that allow you to specialize in attacking, healing, tanking, worker management, or whatever you desire. Aside from your hero, you need to manage your workers, who must gather resources in order to trade for new items and build structures to gain powerful bonuses.

You explore across the Ageless Realms by turning over tiles, discovering resources, side quests, hazards, building sites, traders and creatures as you continue to power up whilst preparing to enter Azure Rise.

At its heart, The City of Kings is a complex puzzle featuring endless strategic battles. Each creature is generated from a pool of spells, characteristics and stats offering over 10,000,000 unique battle situations. There are no dice, damage is persistent, it’s up to you to customize your characters and work together to come up with a strategy to defeat whoever stands in your way.

More than ten million unique battle situations! Sounds like a fine weekend project to try them all out. (KS link)

Level 99 Games has taken an interesting approach with the second set of games for its EXCEED fighting system, with the sixteen characters in these four games all coming from L99's forthcoming game Seventh Cross, a huge design in the works for release in 2018. Level 99 is effectively advertising for a future release, while giving you the chance to fight now with the characters outside of the alternative-Earth 1920s era that forms the setting for Seventh Cross.(KS link)

I'm also enamored by the cocky arrogance of the aggressive limbo-er in the EXCEED cover image: "Look at me, man. I've got this even while wearing my favorite hat!"




Editor's note: Please don't post links to other Kickstarter projects in the comments section. Write to me via the email address in the header, and I'll consider them for inclusion in a future crowdfunding round-up. Thanks! —WEM
Twitter Facebook
14 Comments
Sun Apr 2, 2017 1:05 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
158 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide

Fragor Games Announces Wallace & Gromit License for Next Release

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Gordon and Fraser Lamont of Fragor Games have issued this pictorial press release to announce their next title:




While a Wallace & Gromit game — or perhaps a design based on multiple Aardman Animations titles — might seem like an April Fools' Day joke, Gordon Lamont has assured me that it's not, stating that he and Fraser were at the Aardman Animations studio in Bristol to play the game on the afternoon of March 31, after which they were given the okay to announce the license. Adds Gordon, "Nearest Fragor ever got to an April Fool was to post a picture of a white box with white cards and call it 'Snow Tails: Blizzard Edition'!"

Further evidence comes from the September 2016 announcement by the Lamonts that they wouldn't have a game for release at SPIEL 2016. To quote part of that announcement:

Quote:
We got the opportunity in 2010 of working with a particular license. For reasons unrelated to us, it did not go further at that time. Now, with the advent of Kickstarting, the opportunity of using the license became possible again around last Essen. This makes a change for 2016 in how we will finance/sell the game. It means that our 2016 game will be Kickstarted rather than sold at Essen...

In the near future, we will make a major announcement regarding a license. We are absolutely thrilled to be involved with it.

This is now their 2017 game, of course, but so be it. Congrats to Jez Overton for calling it correctly, and I can't wait to see Gordon looking shifty in a giant penguin outfit at SPIEL 2017!
Twitter Facebook
32 Comments
Sat Apr 1, 2017 3:44 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls

[1]  Prev «  2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6  Next »  [187]

Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.