The Ross-on-Wye Boardgamers

Beer and Boardgames at The Plough Inn (formerly the Prince Of Wales, formerly the White Lion). "It's not F-ing Monopoly, alright?!"

Archive for Ben Bateson

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Friday April 8th - Mexicans on a Boat

Ben Bateson
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Just the three of us this week, and as promised last week, I had read up on Urbanization at John's request. Not an easy task by any means, but if you can get past the obtuse rule-set, the appalling player interface and the terrible nomenclature, there's actually not a bad game here. After a few testy rules recaps (and RE-recaps) we were off and running, John and Becky going into big farming, while I tried to snatch up optimum factories and their associated inventions. This turned out to be a miserable failure, and John - on the basis of some careful analysis - won rather easily. There are STILL a couple of rules I'm not sure about: I'd love this game to get a proper overhaul and become more accessible.

Dos Rios next, an outstanding part of Franz-Benno Delonge's legacy. No rules confusions here, just some very clever hex-based movement. Becky and I had hoped that 3P would be the sweet spot, but it rather seemed to me that it was an opportunity for two other people to gang up on me - perhaps I need to learn a little bit more about defending territory. After a DOUBLE brown-river-bandit attack wiped out both John and I, then Becky was able to build her fifth building at a canter, and we resigned a round before the finish.

With just over an hour remaining, and Becky's inexplicable need to play Animal Upon Animal before we finished, we broke out Macao, safe in the knowledge that we a) all knew the rules and b) John rarely succumbs to AP in this one. It was a stonking game, too. I took some ambitious 'free cube' people early on, taking some frankly ludicrous gambles to get them out before halfway. The gambles didn't pay off, but I backed them up with cards that gave me more bonuses for being last on the Prestige Track and on the wall. John went for offices and tribute points, and Becky concentrated on the wall and matching sets of goods. I was still some fifty points behind starting the final turn of the game, but made most of my deliveries (aided and abetted by a couple of storage tiles) and then scored a massive 20 points off city quarters to overhaul both John and the 100-point mark for a thoroughly pleasing win. Free cubes are great.

Some silly animal-stacking fun inevitably followed. Excuse me if we're bothering you, gents...

From gallery of ousgg
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Sun Apr 10, 2022 11:59 am
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Friday April 1st - Ship of Fools

Ben Bateson
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As happens to all of us from time to time, a shiny new box of games had somehow appeared on the front doorstep. After an enjoyable week of cardboard-punching and rules-swotting, I had selected Carpe Diem as the one most likely to appeal to John and Pete's analytical brains. Nah, not really: I'd bought two perfectly serviceable economic games (Franchise and Blue Skies, if you must know), but I really fancied trying out Carpe Diem.

So 7:15 on Friday saw me scattering bits of card all over the dining table with the manual as emergency backup at my elbow. To be fair, it was a pretty easy teach, with only the many Feldian ways of scoring requiring me to go into some depth. Despite professing her complete confusion, Becky soon picked up on the usefulness of bread and was soon skipping all over the rondel to pick up optimum tiles (and, not surprisingly, win by a decent handful of points). I had saved my bread for forum cards, but it didn't seem half as effective there. Pete built lots of villa and John went heavy into goods. It was all perfectly decent stuff, but I doubt it will ever become a favourite. Also, whoever passed off the terrible muddy artwork should be spoken to in severe terms.

After a generally disappointing loss for John, I gave him free choice, and - after picking another obscurity which I couldn't teach (Urbanization, I remember enjoying it and have promised to read up) - he plucked Quilt Show off the shelf. For those unacquainted with this game, it's a pleasant and slightly cut-throat take on Ticket To Ride. It all feels a bit cheap and card-boardy for a Rio Grande game, though, and the paper money is BEYOND horrible. Anyway, John always wins at sewing games, and he inexplicably did so again at this. He didn't get to choose another one!

Instead, I chose our second Feld of the night, in the form of Bruges, a game which tends towards the sillier end of his range. I played something of a bluff by building four canal sections early and then completely abandoning waterways (sacrificing the odd section to my red threat markers) in favour of some good old house-building. The Preacher who let me discard a threat marker every time I moved on the town square track was gold-dust, and when Pete couldn't scrape together the funds for a town square move, I scooped up a second majority bonus which was the difference between a win and a loss. Pete was going all heavy with high-valued people and lots of cash, but took an ill-advised turn into canal building later on (he'd have done better by building houses or lobbing threat markers, to be honest), but still did enough for a tied-second-place with John, with Becky only a single point behind.

"Riff Raff!" cried John, when I requested suggestions for a quick finishing game. His enthusiasm rather overlooked the fact that he would need to turn his fan off, mind you. It seemed all very democratic that we won one game each tonight, Pete proving very much the best at piratical balancing, including one rogue sailor dangling off the back of the boat like some involuntary rudder...
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Tue Apr 5, 2022 9:00 pm
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Friday 25th March - Three's a Fan

Ben Bateson
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With Covid back on the rise, John's table fan was back in action, so we wrapped up warm. I was already digging out Le Havre when he burst through the front door (John doesn't really 'do' quiet entrances). He looked a bit scared by this bit of Rosenbergian class, until Becky and I reminded him that we were inexpert, and Tony was the real champion.

It was looking good for him for a long time, too - he went into the big ships and eliminated any feeding trouble very early. But this also cost him opportunities to develop, something which Becky was exploiting by buying up all the swankiest buildings. I was left with all the food conversion bits and pieces, which went OK, but I never really felt in contention. Sure enough, Becky wrapped up a good win, cementing this game in her favours.

I've never really been able to pin down Le Havre in my personal hierarchy of Rosenberg games. It's grown somewhat in my estimation over the years, but I still think it feels clunky and doesn't turn over smoothly enough. I'd never want to play it many times a year in the same way as Agricola, Glass Road or Nusfjord. But I did enjoy it tonight.

We moved on to the gloriously out-of-control Pantheon, a game which trial-and-error had assured us was by far best with three. And it was, too. A mad game saw Becky and John, the latter supported by extra turns, battling over the map. I ran a money-heavy engine in opposition to this and stretched a big lead enough that the map-builders couldn't catch up. If you like Stone Age and you like games with crazy acceleration curves, this one is well worth seeking out.

Only time for a quick closing game, Le Havre having taken a solid couple of hours and a bit more. We opted for a Leo Colovini classic: Clans, a hidden-colour game of abstract manoeuvring and bluff. It still holds up remarkably well, and - again - 3P is very much the sweet spot. John got locked into some good old-fashioned AP, but all the thinking didn't help him away from last place. Up front, Becky and I tied for a thrilling tie-breaker, which went my way by only a single village.
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Tue Apr 5, 2022 8:39 pm
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Friday 18th March - Canterbury! Sick and tired, you've been hanging on me

Ben Bateson
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We have been settling down to a 'usual foursome' of late; John and Pete both joined us tonight. Last week, on his scour around my shelves, John had requested a play of 20th Century; I was in no mood to teach a game that I last played a decade ago, so I promised to read up on it for this week.

I remember it being a bugger to teach in 2011, but we had enough experience with auctions to make it a damn sight easier this time. Either that, or games are just getting more and more meaninglessly complex. Hmm...my money's on the latter.

Anyway, it was an intriguing and fast-paced play, all done in an hour. The landscape auctions seemed to be a bit loose and meaningless after our indoctrination in Princes Of Florence, but the 'reverse' auctions for disasters were tense and thinky. I loaded up on recycling centres, but perversely neglected my environmental standards, coming in second to Peter's big green city.

Canterbury is a lesser-known economic city-builder, and one we had only ever played as a couple, being a tad disappointed with the clunky 2-player adaptation. I'm pleased to report that the 4-player version was magnificent, sprawling and thinky with a wealth of intelligent options. John stuck closely to a 'tax and build' strategy, giving him less income but allowing him to tactically build every turn, and it worked excellently - he cleaned up on the final Kings Bonuses scoring and Becky couldn't catch him. Pete and I trailed in some way behind.

We finished with Sagrada, a game which I overplayed a few years ago on launch, left on the shelf and have only recently rediscovered. In moderation, it's fun and really quite clever, as far as the 'make classic buildings out of dice' genre goes. There were some particularly unfriendly dice tonight (when are there anything but?), and John and Pete were left regretting their initial 'go big or go home' choice of windows, their 6 gemstones getting precious little run-out. I romped home for a sizeable win, always pleased to put a 69 on the board.
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Tue Apr 5, 2022 7:43 pm
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Friday 11th March - Been around the world and I, I, I, can't find broccoli rabe

Ben Bateson
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Pete was back with us this week after moonlighting at a pub quiz (how dare he!). I forestalled the 'what shall we play' debate by pulling out A Castle For All Seasons and tried to hammer across the rules, which always seem to be somewhat obtuse to first-timers. For such a simple game, it's got quite a barrier to accessibility, and then you really need to make sure people are up on strategy because silly errors tend to kinda wreck the gameplay. Nevertheless, we got there without too many complaints. I pressured people with early Master Builders, before Becky came up with the correct response of kicking me off the Trader spots altogether. Pete was building houses; John was building towers, and it all culminated very satisfactorily in a tense final scoring. With only one man in the castle, I was pleased with third place, but it was Becky, stockpiling huge amounts of cash, who pipped everyone at the end. But there were only 12 points from first to last, and really any one small decision could have turned the game.

John is invariably delighted by Navegador, and so we indulged him. Although we shouldn't have indulged his rules explanation, being somewhat full of holes and bits we had to fill in later. We even forgot to play with the Navegador card altogether, although it didn't seem to make much difference to be honest. My cathedrals strategy was copied by John to my right, so I switched midgame (and, yes, I can hear all the people who are better at Navegador than me telling me not to do this) to plantations, while John created lots of population and went into factories in a really BIG way. It didn't surprise me that he won, but Pete, doing the bulk of the discovery work, had a really good run at catching him up. And actually, my remnants of the cathedral engine just about squeezed me into second place. Despite the fact that we can't beat John, I DO like this - I think it might overtake Concordia in my estimations soon.

It was all getting a bit serious, so we dissipated tensions with a pair of cooking games. First, a silly bit of Hibachi, Pete emerging the winner with two menu cards back-to-back, and a delightful closing session of Cockroach Salad, where I could say Pete got his comeuppance, if my ability to name vegetables weren't equally as hopeless. John won this after ten minutes of steely salad-making.
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Tue Mar 15, 2022 9:39 pm
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Friday 4th March - Satisfy this man with sausage and beer

Ben Bateson
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Just the three of us tonight, with John making sure that we weren't confined to couples' games all night. He'd brought the anti-Covid fan again: it lasted all of half and hour before he turned it off in a quick outburst of 'bloody annoying, this, isn't it?'. We could have told him that a month ago.

I took a unilateral decision to break out Anno 1800 ('Ah! A predecessor to 18xx!' quipped John). I taught it very careful to avoid any 'you didn't tell me THAT' syndrome, and I think I pretty much succeeded. Not that it did me any good, mind you: I'd just built my steam engine and car factories and set up for a high-scoring run of cards when Becky put a swift end to the game. John, sensibly guided by the game-end scoring cards, had a bunch of points to snaffle off the museum and zoo, and ran Becky a lot closer than I was expecting in the final scoring. Final scores 84-82-66 in Becky's favour. Despite an abysmal performance, I really think 3P is the sweet spot for Anno 1800, and there is a good steep curve - unusual in today's sterile games market - in learning the efficiency of the goods curve.

Becky had been quietly hinting at a game of Macao for a while, which suited John and me just fine. It suited me even better as I watched Becky and John crash multiple punishment markers during the early rounds, I have to say. With a nice Finance Office combo on board and only buying a grand total of two goods from town, I made light work of this game, strolling to 90 points or so. Something of a thrashing, if I may be so modest.

But NOTHING of a thrashing compared to our closing activity. With only about 35 minutes left, I scouted around for a 'good for 3' game, and came up holding dice-chucking classic Airships. With red dice at a premium in the early game, Becky and John waffled about with low-powered zeppelins, but I was building a serious engine, and in short order churned out all four stages of the Hindenberg. I'd like to say it was nail-bitingly close but a 28-8-7 final scoreline kinda speaks for itself.
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Sun Mar 13, 2022 11:49 pm
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Friday February 25th - Trumptastic

Ben Bateson
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Gerv is back!

He has been undergoing a major relocation of late and was pleasantly surprised to find himself well within half-an-hour of games night. He was so close, in fact, that he walked in while I was still reading up the rules for Stockpile. I had received an enterprising variety of trade and/or sale offers for this not-yet-played game, and thought I ought to see whether it was worth our while before moving it on.

Turns out that it was, especially with the full complement of five. A disarming simple flow of play masked a decent amount of bluff and risk, crucially without causing anyone to get bogged down with analysis. It was over in an hour flat and everyone declared themselves satisfied. Not as satisfied as me, with my suspiciously orange, bequiffed character card. Hopefully, I was a little bit less obnoxious in victory, with a narrow win over Pete.

Becky suggested we move onto El Grande next (actually, she couldn't manage the words 'El Grande', but did suggest we move onto 'that game with the cube tower and the enormous penis-like dobber'), and what better for a table of five? It didn't take long to get Pete up to speed and he leapt out into an early lead in a first phase where the Castillo was packed to overlowing. The second phase was an intriguing tactical battle as Becky muscled her way back into matters, taking nearly all her cubes out of the provinces in order to pull level with Pete. As it always does in El Grande, this led to a stiflingly tense final round. I managed to pull the 13 card out in round 9, but I was too far behind to make any big difference. We all thought Becky or Pete would win but at the very end of scoring, they were both overhauled by a resurgent John. He was probably as surprised as anyone by a tremendous victory!

Gerv's return was lending something of a celebratory air to the evening, so it felt right to break out something lighter and party-appropriate. Pictures is very much the go-to game for this situation at the minute: I'm personally charmed by the combination of creativity and deduction, and identifying the possibility that three different people have actually tried to create the same picture is a treat in itself. My particular magnum opus tonight was a three-dimensional tree built from counter-weighted wooden blocks, which only had the slight drawback that it completely collapsed every time Gerv looked at it. Magic tree-wrecking powers aside, it was only enough for us both to come joint-third, because a rampant 31-point John.

And a touch of Botswana to finish. Pete was open to further experiments with the Double Lion, but Gerv had been developing Leopard-switch tactics, and Becky's solid Rhino Gambit was still a threat. John and I were well of the pace, though. The Leopards were the making of the winner tonight, and Gerv romped home, over ten points in front of Pete and Becky.
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Sun Mar 13, 2022 8:39 pm
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Friday February 18th - Tile There Was You

Ben Bateson
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Although our dining room is a poor substitute for The Plough, one thing everyone agrees on is how nice it is to have the entire Bateson collection to choose from rather than what we've packed on the whim of the moment (and turns out to be inappropriate for player count and/or hated by the person who came unannounced). So, tonight, we had a session of 'winner chooses'. As the victor from the previous week, John picked Cryptid, which drew a broad smile from Pete and a groan of deepest apprehension from Becky.

Turns out Becky was tainted by her previous game of Cryptid, a session last November when Gerv and Ian scaled new levels of incomprehension and dopiness. Best bit was Gerv pretending that he was misunderstanding it all on purpose, of course. Tonight, we had four razor-sharp (and untainted by Tony's Plum Porter) minds around the table and - although the official Most Common Cryptid Question ("Are you SURE this one is right?") was asked a couple of times, then no actual errors were made. We could all sense ourselves getting close, but Becky belied her qualms and nobbled the Cryptid after a half-dozen rounds or so.

She chose - somewhat inevitably - Terraforming Mars for our main event. Because we'd all played before, Becky opted for one of the Hellas maps. She played out the Terra corporation, which gave the rest of us a good laugh given that we had handfuls of cards with Earth symbols on. I went slow on the actual terraforming, carefully building a green engine and artfully blocking Becky's cities. But it wasn't to be - John was also hoovering up bacteria (my Search For Life never paid off), and Pete was racing the game to a conclusion on the back of some serious heat production. He had just enough in the tank to squeak a thrilling conclusion over John, 54-53-50-50, which is about as close a finish as I've ever seen.

Pete's victory choice was Azul. He had heard about the buzz but knew nothing of the mechanics, so it was a pleasure to pull it off the shelf. Not that it was treated much like a learning game, of course - there were hints of conspiracy and screwage right from the first round. I hogged the first-player marker which was good enough for 72 points and the win. And, rather entertainingly given that she'd been teaching it to teenagers, Becky got stuck with a massive pile of yellow tiles and something like a -21 point penalty at the end. Gerv will have to work hard to snatch back his 'lowest score' title in this one...

With a solid half-hour remaining to us, I picked the infamous not-a-book-by-John-Lanchester Capital to round things off. And promptly thrashed everyone at that too, using good old-school VPs from purple buildings while everyone else was messing around with parks and suchlike.
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Sun Mar 13, 2022 6:47 pm
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Friday February 11th - John's Fan Club

Ben Bateson
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John was back with us this week, along with his latest ingenious Covid-defence mechanism, which turned out to be a small table fan to blow our droplets out the door. By the time we'd loaded up the table with the fan and the sewing lamp, then there wasn't much room for games!

We sensed after our last game of Babylonia that this would be very much to John's taste. And so it proved: he pounced early for a couple of ziggurat bonuses and assisted valiantly in stopping Pete forming a big chain of tiles. I managed to create my own significant grouping in the centre of the board, but the game accelerated quicker than I was prepared for and I was left too far behind despite a couple of huge turns later on. Becky and Pete ran each other very close for the win, and in fact they finished on scores level, with Pete just edging things thanks to having taken most cities.

We moved onto a swift couple of rounds of 7 Wonders: Architects. John also took to this very well, winning his first game with a massive overload of Colossus-based war and being the first to complete his wonder. The second game was tighter and edgier, with everyone vying to complete their wonder right at the end, but Becky did it first, just edging me out by a couple of points. I've been very much enjoying Architects, not least due to the ease of setup, but it's already starting to feel like it might need an expansion.

Our main event was Key Harvest, the unfairly forgotten and under-rated member of the Key series. With everyone looking at some pretty disjointed boards, the game mounted tension expertly, with the last few auctions being of farm tiles that were significant for several players. So much so, that after the game end was triggered, the final two rounds were something of an anticlimax with not much left to do. Despite my large collection of crops, Becky scored two large fields for a win, but everyone was within five points - what a thriller!

Becky picked Calico to finish: a game suited both to John's analytical brain and Pete's collection of cats (he has about five of the things). But this one didn't swing Becky's way: she picked up a couple of cats, but didn't clock many points from bonus tiles and finished - unusually - below 50 points. John took a very pleasing victory here, completing a gold-scoring bonus tile early which gave him the opportunity to branch out and pick up further points. Delightful game, though.
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Sat Mar 12, 2022 6:18 pm
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Friday February 4th - Doity Rats

Ben Bateson
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After rotating gamers in January, all three of the regulars turned up tonight. Games for 5P were the order of the day, then, and we started off with our copy of Notre Dame. This is a box that has been through the wars: the corners split and the cards laminated after an unpleasant Pepsi incident. It will never get sold, and nor would I want
to sell it: it has something that most Feld games lack, the spirit of fun.

Dave bravely embarked on a carriage-based game (notoriously tricky on the 5P board), Becky went all-in for hospitals, and Pete dragged all his cubes into the game and built the cathedral. I WAS going to go hospital-based as well, but circumstances saw me with two cubes in the park and raking in VP. I even took a couple of plague hits, but it barely slowed me down on my way to a whopping 60 points, Dave trailing in some 10 behind.

Becky pulled Viticulture off the shelf next. This is a particular favourite of Dave's and it didn't take long to brief Pete in the advanced Tuscany rules. It looked cagey at first, but Becky was patiently harvesting grapes, and went VERY big at about the fifth round, making a bundle of wine and leaching bonus points off a building. Fulfilment of several wine contracts inevitably followed while I was trying to abuse the 'trade' space, Pete rearranging stars for maximum map bonuses, and Ian...well, I wasn't quite sure what Ian was doing. She finished with an enormous 37 points - a victory even more convincing than the one I had just clocked up.

We briefly pondered Citadels to finish, but Becky reckoned it would run a bit long, especially after teaching. Instead, we made a very sound decision to give Botswana a run out. Pete, having read the strategy manuals soundly, gave Double Lion a go, but Becky's Rhino Gambit was more than equal to it. Ian, a penalty down for Dominoing The Zebras, struggled with a complete zero in the last round, but the rest of us were within ten points, with Becky setting up a decent win, despite a brave charge from Peter (now playing a little-known Elephant line) in the final round.
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Sat Mar 12, 2022 5:19 pm
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