Mina's Fresh Cardboard

Where I discuss my game buying addiction and love affair with freshly-printed cardboard. I dislike randomness and love high strategy. I play daily with my partner, Peter, who is always ready to win, but mostly ready to lose. Don't worry. He loves it! :)
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In Which the Emperor's Lanterns Bring on Aeon's End * New Reviews for AEON'S END & LANTERNS THE HARVEST FESTIVAL WITH THE EMPEROR'S GIFTS * First Impressions for TOURIA, ULM, FABLED FRUIT * And More!

Milena Guberinic
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Hi Friends!


This week was even worse than the previous one for work! Things have been really hectic! Hopefully, they will slow down soon and I'll have more time to play and write more extensively about more games! But I know I shouldn't be complaining because I've probably a good number of games regardless.

Also, this week, I've decided to change the titles of my blog sections. This will be a permanent change, as it has come to my attention that my previous titles are no longer valid and may seem like I am big 'ol board game snoot! I am not!!! I promise! So I'm changing! I've changed "What's New?" to "Reviews" and "What's Not So New But Still Exciting?" to "Session Reports" to better reflect what I mean.

Finally, since Christmas is almost here, I want to wish you all a MERRY CHRISTMAS or whatever other holiday you may celebrate. Festivus. Whatever! I look forward to spending some time with my sister and mom playing games! I'm going to come armed with Pickle Letter in one hand and Beasts of Balance in the other! And maybe some Happy Salmon for dessert!

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***


Reviews




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The Overview


In Aeons End, you take on the roles of intrepid heroes defending the city of Gravehold against hordes of attacking monsters! In each game, you face a unique monster with a unique set of abilities and in each game, you take on the roles of a different set of characters and because both the monsters and characters act so differently from one another, each game feels very different from the previous one.

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Characters

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Market cards you can acquire over the course of the game

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All the nemeses


Because Aeons End is a variable-turn-order game, the first thing you do each round is to flip the turn card that determines whether one of the players or the monster takes a turn. On a player turn, you may first use any or all of your prepared spells on your enemy and then can take any number of actions using the cards you have in hand. You are not allowed to discard any cards, but you can always arrange the cards you've played in any order prior to discarding. Your actions include things like using gems to buy new cards, activating a partner's spell without exhausting it, using gems to activate your character's special ability, etc. Spell abilities generally allow you to punish the baddies and their minions.

The baddies like to do a lot of punishing of their own! Each turn, they unleash all their minions and powers revealed in previous turns and they do some new bad stuff, which can include punishing you, the players, or punishing the city of Gravehold.

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Crooked mask and some of his punishment cards


The game ends either when Gravehold has been reduced to 0 life or when the baddie you are up against has been reduced to 0 life.

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The Review


Played prior to review 11x






1. Awesome art and story
Aeon's End features a unique and diverse cast of characters to ensure that everyone has a face and story with which they can identify. My personal favorite is Jian!

2. Unique turn-order system
Between the variable turn order, card-play system, the lack of deck shuffling, and the combination of tower defense with deck building, Aeon's End has a lot to offer for those seeking something "different."

Chief among the game's unique qualities is its turn order system. In most games, you know when your turn is coming and can plan accordingly. In Aeon's End, turn order is another figure you have to add to your statistics calculations each turn. When the turn order deck is full, you know that the odds of your turn being drawn are 1/3 (in a two-player game). As the deck is depleted, the odds change and may affect the cards you choose to play and save. For example, if you are fighting against a nemesis who will punish the player with the most prepped spells and you have less life than your opponent, you might keep a spell or two in your hand even though you could cast them to ensure you don't end up getting knocked out prematurely.

The turn order system isn't just "different;" it adds significantly to the decisions you make in the game! It's good stuff!

3. Unique card-play system
Aeon's End also comes with an interesting card-play system. There are two elements that are interesting here. First, in order to play "spells" (your chief way of dealing with nemesis shenanigans and your only way of reducing your nemesis to 0 life), you have to spend the game's currency to focus (reducing the cost to open) or open breaches. These breaches give you additional card slots and each mage has a unique set of breach opening costs. In fact, one has one fewer breach altogether! The effect of all this breach business is that you have to carefully evaluate when and how many to focus or open vs. purchase cards from the market. It creates many interesting decision points that set the game apart from other deck builders.

The other aspect of the card-play system that sets the game apart from other deck builders is the fact that you never shuffle your deck. Therefore, you get some control over the way your cards come out in future rounds and can set up synergies and combos with your cards. For example, if you purchase a card that will allow you to remove a card from your deck, you might want to sandwich it between sparks or cheapo gems to ensure you can get rid of what you want to get rid of!

4. Incredibly challenging and satisfying
Aeons End is tense and challenging, with each of the games we've played so far ending either in a loss or a near loss! Not once have we EASILY won the game, which is something that HAS happened in other co-ops like Pandemic. The victories feel all that much sweeter as a result!

6. Super duper awesome high replay value
Aeon's End can be played over and over and over again and you'll find yourself discovering new aspects of the game every time. There is a huge amount of variety in the game!

First, the monsters behave very differently from one another and some modify the win/loss conditions. Typically, you lose when Gravehold dies, but the Glutton, for example, doesn't touch Gravehold. Instead, he consumes the card market and you lose if he eats up all the cards before you kill him!

The characters themselves are also very different from one another, as each starts with a unique ability and character-specific card, as well as a uniquely composed deck and portal configuration.

Finally, the game comes with 42 different market cards (I'm including the expansions that came in the KS version) and you'll only use 9 of these in any given game!

And if you consider the number of possible combinations of all these factors...well...there are many! I can't do math right now. It's late.

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soblue


soblue 1. Setup and teardown is quite involved
Between setting up the market, doling out character-specific cards and decks, and handling all the nemesis-specific setup, Aeon's End can take a bit of time and effort to set up and tear down.

soblue 2. The variable turn order can create some down time
I am used to playing two-player games with very little down time. Basically, by the time I've figured out what I'm doing on my turn, my turn is already here. Always. In Aeon's End, turn order is variable. And, as cool and unusual and unpredictable and awesome as that is, it can create some unusual down time. It can happen that you get a double turn and then don't get to do anything for another 4-8 turns. Of course, turns are quick and even nemesis actions and effects are relatively easy to administer, but all the upkeep/waiting business takes a bit longer than I would like. That said, I think the variable turn order is worth the extra down time. Just be aware that the game can feel a little slow at times and may be best at lower player counts.

soblue 3. The game can be easy or impossible depending on the interaction between the market cards, characters, and nemesis in play
This is a criticism that can be lodged against pretty much any co-operative game. A large number of random elements are inherently necessary in co-ops due to the fact that they demand a random "AI" for the players to fight.

Perhaps the fact that some characters and cards are particularly well suited to fighting certain nemeses leads me to believe that there are some "optimal" and some "impossible" setups for each nemesis. Perhaps I'm mistaken, but this, combined with the fact that every game we have won has come down to the wire leads me to suspect that the stars can align for or against you particularly strongly in this game.

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Final Word


It would be understatement to say that I had high expectations for Aeon's End. Fortunately, my expectations were met. And exceeded. Aeon's End is a tense, challenging, highly replayable, and intensely satisfying co-op puzzle. Right now, it sits atop my list of gaming obsessions, as I continue to pull it out to try all the various character and monster combinations and take down the baddest of baddies! If you're a fan of deck-building co-ops or co-ops in general, Aeon's End is a must!

MINA'S LOVE METER heart heart heart heart LOTS OF LOVE


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Box!

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Five days of Aeon's End together at last!


***




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The Overview


Lanterns is an abstract tile-laying game in which you are tasked with decorating the palace lake with floating lanterns! The game starts with one lake tile in play and you start with 3 lake tiles in hand.

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Each turn, you
1) may exchange one of your lantern cards for another from the supply by using 2 favor tokens,
2) may make a dedication by exchanging lantern cards in your supply for point tokens (scoring tile options include four of a kind, three pairs, and seven unique lantern cards), and
3) must place a lake tile from your hand adjacent to an existing lake tile. You get a matching bonus if you match the color of any side of your newly placed lake tile to that of an adjacent one. This bonus comes in the form of a lantern card of that color. You also get a favor token if the matching adjacent lake tile has a platform on it.
4) Finally, EACH PLAYER gets a lantern card of the color facing them.

The game ends once the stack of tiles runs out and the player who has accumulated the most points wins!

The expansion gives you a few more options in the form of:
1. Pavilions
When playing with the expansion, each player receives a set of pavilions in their color and the Emperor's pavilion is positioned on the starting tile at the start of the game.

The pavilions act like the platforms on the base game lake tiles, but instead of favor tokens, you get gift tokens, which you can later use to activate Emperor card actions.

Whenever you place a lake tile, you may place one of your pavilions on it, as long as it is not adjacent to another pavilion. If the lake tile you place matches the color of an adjacent lake tile with a pavilion on it, you get a gift token, but so does the player who owns that pavilion, which provides an incentive for placing pavilions.

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2. Emperor card activation
The expansion includes a set of 5 Emperor cards, 2 of which you will use in any given game. These give you two additional action options and can be activated at various points during the course of the game by spending 2 gift tokens.

Emperor cards may allow you to rotate a tile, gain honor points directly using favor tokens, perform an end-of-turn dedication, perform a special lantern card exchange action to obtain wild lantern cards, or perform a special Emperor dedication using 5 unique cards of different colors, a full house of colors, or five of a kind.

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The Review


Played prior to review 6x






1. Pretty!
Lanterns is colorful and vibrant and the artwork simply exudes joy! I love pulling it out just to look at the pretty tiles!

2. Quick and simple, with or without the expansion
You can teach this game to anyone in a few minutes. The base game took me about 2 minutes to teach Peter and he got it immediately. Adding the expansion immediately wouldn't be a problem for a seasoned gamer, as it adds a few simple options that vastly improve the game's decision space. However, if introducing the game to a child or non-gamer, I would stick with the very simple base game prior to introducing the expansion. Either way, the game plays quickly (about 20 minutes with two decisive players) and can be taught quickly.

3. Lots of emergent depth
Even though Lanterns is simple to learn and teach, the game seems to grow every time you play. At first, it seems to be a relatively pleasant little tile-laying game in which you can do whatever you please to maximize points by optimally arranging your tiles to give you the biggest card payoffs each turn, largely unfettered by the actions of your opponents. And then you realize how few lantern cards there are in the deck. With two players, you can be quite strategic about keeping track of the available lantern cards and the lantern cards your opponent has in order to prevent them from obtaining a 4-of-a-kind or all 7 colors or whatever goal they seem to be pursuing.

4. Tense
Games of Lanterns are always tight scoring affairs, so every point you can manage to squeeze out can mean the difference between victory and defeat. The fact that the dedication tiles are arranged in descending VP payoff means that you are effectively racing to be the first to get to each stack as quickly and efficiently as possible as many times as possible before the lake tile stack runs out. This means that (at least, when playing with two players), you are always keeping track of your opponent's potential dedications and the remaining dedication tiles to ensure you get the biggest point payoffs possible.

5. Many options added by the expansion for even greater depth and vastly expanded decision space
The expansion adds much to the game. First, it gives you more game-to-game variability. Because only two of the five Emperor cards are used in any given game, you will have a different set of additional actions from which to choose in every game...at least in a bunch of games before the combinations start repeating again!

By giving you additional action options, the expansion challenges your brain's computing power in new ways. You have a number of new decisions each turn! Do you rotate that tile or do a double dedication? Do you put that tile next to a pavilion just to get some of those gift tokens to help you activate an Emperor card? The Emperor cards challenge you to make difficult new tradeoffs and decisions and they are wonderful!

soblue


soblue 1. Plenty of randomness
Lanterns is a light, tactical game with a moderate level of randomness. Yes, you can make and execute some plans, but they typically don't extend beyond your next turn. And even then, your opponent's tile placement can turn all your planning upside down. Keep this in mind if you are averse to such things.

soblue 2. Base game doesn't give you enough options for favor tokens, but the expansion solves this issue nicely
In the base game, you can quickly accumulate a large number of favor tokens and have nothing to do with them. They are certainly useful in getting the exact lantern card colors you need when you need them and take some of the stress out of the tile arranging puzzle, but you can only use them once per turn. Every game of Lanterns I've played with the base game alone has ended with me holding a large number of unused favor tokens. That just seems a little...off.

soblue 3. If you are prone to AP, this game seems to bring it out to the MAX
Peter can slow waaaaaaaaaaay down when playing certain games and Lanterns is one of them. The tile-placement puzzle can be "solved" for optimal placement. You have 3 tiles and a limited number of places to put them. But as the game goes on, those options expand and expand to the point that the puzzle can still be "solved" to achieve a PERFECT placement, but the time required to get to that solution necessarily expands with those options. And this can be a problem. Watch out if you're playing with a Peter! Just sayin'.

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Final Word


Lanterns didn't pique my interest when it first came out because small, abstract games just tend not to scream "PLAY ME!" to me. However, after trying it out at BGG Con, I knew I'd have to try it again and again! And the prospect of additional action options in the expansion didn't hurt my excitement.

Of course, the game turned out to be a hit! This game looks and tastes like candy! It's sweet! It's tasty! But it has a bit of a bitter core..perhaps it's one of those cough-medicine-filled candies! It has a bitter, bitter heart, forcing you to do your best to screw your opponent out of being able to gain dedication tiles and maximizing the rate at which you acquire them yourself. This quality may be less significant at higher player counts, but with two, this is a pretty little game with an evil heart! And I love it!

MINA'S LOVE METER (base game) heart heart LIKE

MINA'S LOVE METER (base game with expansion) heart heart heart SOME LOVE


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***


First Impressions




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Ulm is a game about life in the city of Ulm in the 16th century. It's actually quite a themeless game with an incredibly clever action-selection mechanism. Each turn, you pull a random action tile from a bag of tiles and slide it into a 3x3 grid of action tiles. You can only slide tiles into rows and columns that don't already have a "kicked out" tile (i.e. a tile that was slid out of the grid in a previous turn) and you get to take 3 actions each turn, with each action tile remaining in the row/column to which you've added your new action tile giving you 1 action each. The actions include obtaining coins, obtaining/clearing away action tiles that are cluttering up the sides of the 3x3 grid, buying a card by returning 2 action tiles you've already obtained, moving your barge along the Danube, and paying 2 coins to place one of your seals on a free space in one of the city quarters between which your barge is currently located. The game ends after 10 rounds, at which point you get points for Ulm sparrows (which you can obtain throughout the game by owning a city coat of arms), the position of your barge along the Danube, sets of cathedral cards, and sets of trade cards.

Ulm is a game of contradictions. It is simple yet complex and fast paced and yet slow. The system is brilliantly elegant; draw an action tile + place an action tile. However, the simplicity of the system is marred by the opacity and multitude of symbols used to describe the many auxiliary actions that take place in the game. And while the system should theoretically create a very smooth-playing game that is over very quickly, it fails to do that due to the need to constantly reference the rulebook. This is definitely primarily a first-play grievance, but I think it's a legitimate one nonetheless, as it has definitely affected my enthusiasm to play again. That said, I see great potential in the game and look forward to getting over the initial symbol overload.

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


***




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In Touria, you and your friends compete to win the heart of the prince or princess of Touria! You represent a traveling group of adventurers as you move from location to location to gather gems, trade those gems for coins, and collect admiration by fighting the dragons lurking in the countryside. Your goal is to collect 7 coins and 7 hearts and then find the prince and princess in the castle in order to marry...one of them!

Each turn, you select one of four action options that are presented to you on 4 towers located at the corners of the kingdom. Each of the towers has 4 side and each side presents you with a different action option, so each turn, you will be able to select from at least 2 and at most 4 different actions. Once you select an action, you rotate the tower, which will change the action available to you on your next turn, but also will change the action available to your opponent(s). Actions include things like gaining magical items, fulfilling orders by delivering gems of certain colors to exchange for coins, fighting the dragon to gain hearts, and simply trading gems/coins/hearts, among other things.

Every time you select an action, you have to move the group of adventurers to that action space, paying coins to move them further than 3 spaces. And every time the group of adventurers moves over a gem mine, you have to take 1 or both gems standing there. You pick one if both are colored, but if one of the two gems is a wicked black gem, you have to take both! So you end up cursed! And if you're cursed, you can't enter the castle! You have to take actions to rid yourself of the cursed gems before you can wed the prince or princess!

The game ends when one player has 7 coins and 7 hearts and has revealed the castle door behind which the prince and princess are hiding!

Touria is like a sparkle unicorn prancing through a rainbow sky. It's sweet and filled with fun, but a bit on the fluffy side, so if you're not into fluff, stay away.

First, for the substance. The action-selection mechanism is brilliant! Having 4 options from which to select and having the action you select affect your opponent's options gives you an interesting puzzle to solve each turn.

Next, for the fluff. There is a TONNE of randomness in this game. From the dice rolling to determine the color of gem you have to give up in order to appease the dragon and win some hearts to the flipping of the castle doors at the end of the game, the game is RIFE with randomness. And I don't say that only because I am bitter about the fact that Peter fought the dragon twice and rolled the EXACT gem color he had the first time both times and I fought him once and kept rolling the one color I didn't have over and over again until I ran out of swords! No. That's not why I say this!

Considering the good and the bad, my feelings about Touria fall firmly in favor of the good. Despite the frustration with the level of randomness in the game, I found myself having a lot of fun with it. And the action selection mechanism is indeed brilliant. I look forward to playing it a few more times to see where I will finally settle, but I like it for now! #notbitter

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


***




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Fabled Fruit is a game that expands and changes over the course of multiple sessions. In the first game, you start with the first 6 stacks of action cards. Each turn, you move your animal to a different action card to carry out the corresponding action. Actions include things like drawing fruit cards, exchanging fruit cards with your opponent, etc. On your turn, instead of moving an animal to a card to carry out the action, you may move your animal to a card to fulfill its order by discarding the required fruit cards from your hand. Every time an order is fulfilled, a new one comes out from a huge stack of action cards, potentially opening additional action options. The first player to fulfill 5 orders wins!

At the end of each game, all cards used in fulfilled orders are removed from the game and the current cards constitute the available actions in the next game.

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Fabled Fruit has a strange addictive quality. Initially, it appears to be a simple and rather lackluster race, set-collection card game, but when you start playing and revealing new actions and the game literally grows in front of you, you want to play more and more! You want to see more! You want to experience more! New options! New possibilities! New combinations! It's amazing!

Now, it's not all happy fun times with Fabled Fruit. At least with two players. With two players, you can generally go back and forth between the "best" actions in the game without having to give up any fruit cards (if you want to move your animal to a card occupied by another player's animal, you have to give that player a fruit card). With more players, you would have to put more thought into when to do this and which cards to give to your opponent. Regardless, I do look forward to playing this a few more times. Our first session lasted a total of 4 games!

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What do you mean by 'Fabled Fruit isn't a stacking game!?'


***


Session Reports


Alchemists
Once upon a time, I owned a copy of Alchemists. I did not enjoy it enough to warrant keeping, so I sold it. This year, the King's Golem expansion showed up and guess what? I HAD to try it, which also meant I had to re-acquire a copy of the base game! Of course, having failed to love the base game, I fully intended to jump right into the expansion material...until I opened the expansion box. Module 1, module 2, module 3, combine this, exclude that, remember this, remind you of that...It was too much! There is SO MUCH stuff in the expansion! And I could barely remember how to play the game!!! So, I had to go through the book and re-learn the game.

The re-learning experience wasn't as tough as I thought it would. It was actually much easier for Peter than it was for me. He seemed to breeze through the deduction bits and had all the potions figured out halfway through the game. One of my original complaints about the game was that it was just too easy to figure everything out rather quickly and that proved to be the case yet again. For Peter. Not so much for me. Perhaps my math skills have slipped since 2014 or whenever it was that Alchemists first came out, but I just couldn't figure anything out. I did get unlucky with a couple of neutral results at the start of the game, but even with that, I should have been able to figure SOMETHING out. Nope. I kinda decided to guess at everything and hope for the best. It was hilarious and we were both laughing the whole time. Peter kept telling me I had no idea what I was cooking and I would just blow myself up! And it was kinda true. I ended up screwing up a few ingredients' alchemicals and losing a few (many...shhh) points, but I ended up only a few points behind Peter in the final scoring because I spent a good chunk of time collecting artifacts and...well...having cheater alchemicals published, which ensured I could keep raking in the end-of-round majority points. I'm cheese! It was SO MUCH fun! I can't wait to try the expansion!

I still have the same problems with Alchemists that I had when I first played; it's a relatively simple puzzle with a relatively simple worker placement game around it that is procedurally over-complicated and over long. HOWEVER, I see fun in it. I hope the expansion adds more fun. I could use the laughs.

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Guilds of London
Guilds of London is yet another game we entirely forgot how to play! We had played it three times prior to Essen Spiel and then...not again. Poor thing got drowned out by the noise of the shiny newer games. Well, it didn't take us long to reboot in this case, but it did take us a while to start getting in each others' way, which is what this game is all about!

I quite missed playing this game. My favorite part is the puzzle of coordinating your masters' locations with your end-game goals. Lots of fun!

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


Railroad Revolution
Railroad Revolution is brilliant! In this game, I decided to go for the long distance scoring by building a nice, long rail network. I was so completely focused on that that I figured I wouldn't end up being able to complete many contracts, but I was so wrong. Because you draw 3 contracts and pick one, you can pretty much tailor them to suit your current needs, so I ended up completing even more contracts than in our first game! It was beautiful! I love all the synergies in this game and cannot wait to play more!

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Great Western Trail
I once again took a different approach in GWT! There weren't many cowboys available for hire, so I decided to go for station tile and building scoring, which was an unusual combo, but it worked! Not as well as the cows, but it worked.

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


Isle of Skye: From Chieftain to King + PROMOS
I have the Brettspiel Adventskalendar and the other promo box from Spiel, but had not played with a single one of the promos from either of those until this week! I'm not sure why...perhaps because I misplaced a bunch of them . Either way, I saw the Isle of Skye ones sitting on top of the Isle of Skye box and decided it was time to get started on the promos...at least the ones I could locate!

The promos in both sets are unlike the previous promos provided for the game, as they are landscape tiles rather than scoring tiles. I prefer the promos that provide additional scoring options, but I'll take these too. The landscape tiles are not all that special, but some have different effects depending on the round during which they come into play.

Overall, I enjoyed playing with these new tiles, but they are certainly not necessary. Unlike the additional scoring criteria, they don't really add anything to the game.

Peter won this game handily! I priced my things poorly and ended up

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


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From gallery of milenaguberinic


Roll Player
Roll Player continues to excite! Of course! How could it not!? It's a game about building characters!

In this game, I created a champion elf, who was reckless, foolish, and cunning! Doesn't that sound like the most fun combination ever! Actually, it sounds like the most unlikely combination, bordering on contradictory, but who's keeping track!? She won me the game!

Peter made a dwarf. He was a big dwarf. A big protector dwarf!

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


Warsaw: City of Ruins
It had been a while since our last game of Capital and I felt like a quick, but somewhat involved game, so we settled on Capital.

In this game, I completely (and I mean COMPLETELY) ignored the end-of-round bonus tiles, which may have been a mistake. I did the same thing in the previous game, but didn't suffer for it too badly because they weren't all that sexy. In this game, I also did another thing badly - I spent most of the game with huge 2x2 park tiles for no reason! They were just sitting there. Instead of overbuilding them with something more useful, I kept overbuilding other tiles! It was silly. I think my brain was somewhere else. Oh well. Peter won the day!

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


The Oracle of Delphi
I started the game with the +2 movement tile and Peter had the +1 favor tile. We had an issue with the +1 favor tile in a previous game. In that game, Peter got completely demolished because I had a tile that allowed me to move my gods to their first positions instead of their bottom positions once I used them. My ability seemed quite superior. My ability seemed quite superior this time as well. And that's exactly what it turned out to be. I kept getting +2 move every turn, which was particularly important due to the strange layout we had. Peter still had half his tasks to complete when I ended the game...

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


Dark Castle
Peter finally gets it!!!! YAY! This was our third time playing. The first two times were marred by his frustration and less-than-perfect understanding of the game. No matter how hard I tried to explain, he just didn't get it and didn't want to hear strategy tips, so...Yeah. He finally started using the yellow tower that allows you to peek at two tower cards! And he WON! By one point!

This game seems completely random. And while there is certainly a great deal of randomness, you do have the yellow tower to help you gain vital information for end-game scoring. That said, your access to yellow diamond cards needed to activate said yellow tower can be a complete crapshoot, so...Relatively random game, but a fun 15-minute diversion nonetheless.

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


Encore!
This was my WORST game of noch mal ever! I have no idea what I was doing. I wasn't paying attention to Peter's sheet and I was just randomly picking things to fill. Tip: DO NOT randomly pick things to fill. A bit of thought is required!

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***


Fresh Cardboard


1. Royals - Area control generally isn't at its best with two players. There are exceptions, of course (like Inis, which I absolutely ADORE with two and wouldn't play with any more!), but they are few and far between. Let's hope this is an exception! It certainly looks inviting! Will be trying it next week!
2. Onitama - Beautiful! Beautiful! Beautiful! Intrigued by the uniquely shaped box, I just HAD to unshrink this thing the MOMENT I received it! And I was not disappointed by the contents! I can't wait to try the game, but I don't think it can disappoint. Excitement!

***


Next Week...


Look forward to reviews for Onitama and Ulm! This is a rare week! My reviews for next week have actually already been decided! Typically, I am too indecisive for this kind of behavior!

I also FINALLY received my copy of Mechs vs. Minions yesterday, so I will definitely be playing that TONIGHT! ASAP! NOW! I'm also SUPER looking forward to Russian Railroads: American Railroads, which also arrived the same day! I was super bummed when I missed it at Spiel, but it's mine now!!!!

From gallery of milenaguberinic

Kicking winter in the butt with fuzzy coats and board games!


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heart THANK YOU FOR READING AND HAPPY HOLIDAYS! heart


From gallery of milenaguberinic

Jackie found her favorite game!!!
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