Mina's Fresh Cardboard

Where I discuss my game buying addiction and love affair with freshly-printed cardboard. I dislike randomness and love high strategy. I play daily with my partner, Peter, who is always ready to win, but mostly ready to lose. Don't worry. He loves it! :)
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In Which a Dokmus Reigns Over an Energy Empire! Shhh. A Dokmus is a Kind of Mouse! ;) * New Reviews for MANHATTAN PROJECT: ENERGY EMPIRE & DOKMUS * First Impressions for FLIP CITY: WILDERNESS, DAIRYMAN, SANTORINI, & ROME: CITY OF MARBLE * Plus PAX South!

Milena Guberinic
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Hi Friends!


Getting better! Woohoo! Just in time for PAX South next week! Unfortunately, the poor weather in Toronto has meant that my photos all turned out a bit more blurry and dark than usual. Blurry and dark is sad. I'm looking forward to some sun in San Antonio! Come on, Texas! MAKE IT HAPPEN! Oh! And BBQ!

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Reviews




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The Overview


I had little interest in the original Manhattan Project game due to its nuclear war theme, but Manhattan Project: Energy Empire caught my attention. It is a game I had been excitedly awaiting since the Kickstarter was launched! Tableau/engine-building games are among my favorites and this one came with adorable pieces and illustration, so I had every hope it would be a hit.

In Manhattan Project: Energy Empire, you and your friends compete to build the best nation by adding government, industry, and commerce buildings into your tableau and then running them with workers.

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Player board

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Game board


Each turn, you place members of your work force, along with units of energy, on one of 3 sections of the board - government, industry, and commerce - to obtain resources, obtain cards, convert resources, obtain money, or obtain energy dice. Every time you activate a certain section of the game board, you may use additional workers (and energy) to activate any and all buildings of that type in your tableau. If you want to place a worker on a board space that is already occupied, you simply have to create a stack of workers/energy one higher than the highest stack already in the space! This means that no space is ever fully blocked.

The timer in the game comes in the form of pollution tokens, which are removed from the game or added to a player's tableau every time a player runs out of workers and has to "reset" their board. When you run out of workers, you must perform a reset action, recovering all your workers from the board and your cards, gaining an objective tile if you have two or more unused workers/energy remaining in your possession when you reset, discarding all remaining energy, and rolling your energy dice to determine how much energy you will have in the following round and whether you will have to add a pollution token to your board or remove it from the game.

Once a single stack of pollution tokens runs out, an event occurs, affecting everyone by generating pollution, blocking off areas of the board, or otherwise altering the rules of the game.

When the game ends, you score points for buildings, energy dice, unpolluted areas of your board, and objective tiles.

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Building cards

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Government section

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Industry section

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Commerce section


The Review






1. Great production and graphic design
Manhattan Project: Energy Empire is a) pretty and b) highly functional. Josh Cappel always does a great job of making his illustrations both visually attractive and clean and effective at communicating game processes and pieces. I love the player boards, which clearly outline your starting situation, provide a clear summary of die functions, and give you a great way to organize all the little chits and pieces you acquire throughout the game. The main board is similarly effective at expediting the setup process and making it easy to remember how many of each card to lay out. But my favorite part of the main board is the event space, which is illustrated to look like a newspaper page! Perhaps totally unnecessary, but totally awesome!

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The attractiveness and clarity of the graphic design makes Manhattan Project: Energy Empire a breeze to learn. And once you learn how to play the game, you won't forget what things do very easily. In fact, the icons are so clear that they look nearly exactly like the things they are meant to represent AND there aren't very many of them. I can see expansions for this game adding many more functions to the game without eliciting confusion or overwhelming anyone.

My final piece of love for the graphic design: I love the fact that you get two starting nations from which to choose and simply use the back of the one you don't choose as a player aid! This is a no-waste graphic design system!

The production is spectacular as well! Between the adorable metal oil drums, steel bars, and pink plastics, I'm in happy component heaven! And while I know that some will complain about the "thinner" player board cardboard, I am actually a fan of the more pliable player boards, as the thick ones tend to warp.

2. Many different ways to score points
Manhattan Project: Energy Empire gives you so many scoring options! And I love such games because this means you can play with them to explore the effectiveness of various combinations of these over many sessions.

In Manhattan Project: Energy Empire, you can score points by building buildings, using buildings to score points throughout the course of the game, keeping tabs on the events to ensure you can satisfy their scoring requirements, collecting energy dice, keeping pollution at bay, and acquiring and fulfilling objectives! Is that enough!? You have so many options every time you play! Do you let pollution run rampant in exchange for great buildings and the freedom to focus on objectives and maximizing your ability to get things done with energy? Or do you focus on keeping pollution at bay by acquiring eco-friendly energy dice and keeping tabs on the events? There are many strategies to explore!

3. Huge sense of escalation
Early in the game, you are able to take single unrelated actions, but as you build your tableau of like-category buildings (i.e. government, industry, or commerce) and acquire additional workers, taking any single related action on the main board allows you to activate any number of these like-colored buildings, which can result in huge chains of actions on a single turn. You can create fun synergies between like-colored buildings that encourage you to exhaust all workers in a single turn as well.

4. Not enough time to do everything!
You want to see what the events are, you want to collect as many energy dice as possible, you want to build ALL the buildings! But you can't! Manhattan Project: Energy Empire challenges you to do as much as possible with a limited number of actions. You can expand the number of actions you can take over the course of the game and each turn by spending some time to acquire additional workers and taking chances with energy dice. You can use energy to activate buildings and ensure you are able to take actions that have already been taken on the main board, but you risk taking on pollution.

Manhattan Project restricts your ability to do things with the few actions you get throughout the game and allows you to expand your ability to do things by giving you the option to acquire more workers and, more interestingly, energy.

5. Player-controlled game progress
And more workers and more energy will lead you to become better able to control the rate at which the game moves forward! Each reset you make in the game and/or every time you run out of workers in the game pushes the game forward by removing one of the event countdown pollution tokens. SO, you are in charge! This is important because it allows you to strategically use knowledge of events against your opponents, pushing the game forward when you know you stand to acquire the most points from them. It also allows you to push the end of the game forward when you can see you are ahead.

6. Tricky tradeoffs
Selecting which energy dice to add to your life can be tricky! The green and blue dice ensure that you can consistently generate energy without pollution, but you can only have so many of these, they are expensive, AND they generate less energy than the ever-so-dangerous nuclear dice! Energy helps you get more done in the game, so the point-to-action tradeoff can be a difficult one to assess.

7. Lots of variety
You have a huge number of starting nations (i.e. variable "powers"), building cards, and event cards to create a different puzzle every time!

8. Works well with two!
Worker placement games frequently require lots of changes or blocking off spaces or other things to make them tense with two players. The changes to the two-player game in EE are simple and effective. You have a neutral worker in each of the building acquisition spaces on the board and smaller stacks of event-triggering pollution tiles! Simple and effective at a) ensuring the game doesn't go on too long and b) ensuring that the game remains tense and challenging, as you have to contend with the nasty neutral workers that increase the worker "cost" of building things!

soblue


Nothing. I honestly cannot think of anything I dislike about this game.

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Final Word


Engine-building games are among my favorite kinds of games and Energy Empire is one of my new favorite engine builders! While many tableau/engine-building games are relatively simple and relatively limited affairs of discovering synergistic card powers, Energy Empire gives the challenge of finding card synergies a coat of competition for worker placement spaces, a sprinkle of timing and pacing, and a dash of resource management. Simple to learn and play and endlessly engaging with its variety in scoring and setup, Energy Empire is sure to please! It sure pleases me!

MINA'S LOVE METER heart heart heart heart LOTS OF LOVE

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The Overview


Dokmus! WHAT DOES THAT MEAN!? What is a Dokmus!? Whatever a Dokmus may or may not be, the game of Dokmus is a tactical, puzzly, area-control game that physically quite closely resembles the hilarious Cones of Dunshire. I thank my friend, Darrin, for noticing that!

To set up the game, you randomly arrange the 8 map tiles in a 3x3 grid, with the middle piece empty. If playing with two players, you make a map out of 5 tiles.

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Each turn, you select one of 3 (in a two-player game) power tiles and then your opponent selects another. Each power tile comes with a number that denotes your turn order for that round. Each power tile also comes with a power you may use during your turn.

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On your turn, you have to place 3 tents on the board. You have to place tents next to tents you already have, you have to sacrifice a tent to cross a river or place another tent on a forest, and you have to sacrifice tents you place on volcanoes at the end of your turn. Additionally, you can use the power of the tile you selected. The powers allow you to move one of your existing tents, rotate a tile, or shift a tile.

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At the end of the game you get victory points for discovered temples and ruins on the map, with bonuses awarded for having discovered temples and ruins on multiple tiles and for having discovered all temples and ruins on single tiles, and having sacrificed more tents than your opponent.

The Review






1. Simple and quick to set up and play
Each turn, you pick a power and plop down 3 tents on the board. That's the game. You can teach Dokmus in a couple of minutes and you can get anyone to understand its simple principles very quickly.

The game is EXCEEDINGLY simple to set up and tear down. You randomly place a few smallish tiles on the table...and BAM!

2. Numerous interesting decision points and tradeoffs
This is a simple abstract game. And yet, it is filled with challenges and tradeoffs! You are faced with a relatively large number of different ways to score points and these are mutually exclusive, so whenever you make points in one way, you are losing out on points in another. The challenge is to find the perfect balance for the perfect point payoff.

Your chief way of making points is by discovering temples and ruins. Check. BUT, the fact that you get bonuses for discovering these on multiple tiles AND for each tile on which you discover ALL of these means you are pulled in two different directions. Do you try to rotate and slide-puzzle your way to all the tiles or do you stick to trying to discover all the temples on a few close tiles? Of course, you have to contend with the whims of your opponent and being blocked from being able to discover a final temple or ruin is standard course, so your tradeoffs and decision points tend to be more tactical than strategic. And that's actually a good thing because it adds to the decision making in the game. You can make chess-like predictions and hypotheses for the next turn or two, but then have to modify your course as you see what your opponent actually does!

3. High setup variability for high replay value
Even though Dokmus doesn't come with a huge number of different interchangeable tiles or powers, the game still has a great amount of variability and replay value. Setup variability is achieved through the fact that you will only use a subset of the double-sided tiles (when playing with two...otherwise you will use all of the tiles in every game), which will be randomly arranged.

The different setups will ensure you will face a different optimization puzzle in each game and the unpredictable moves of your opponent will ensure that you face unique tactical considerations each turn!

Plus, there is a lot to learn in this game! Both about the game and your opponent!

4. Addictive
Dokmus is so quick and simple to play that after each session, I find myself begging for another! I just can't seem to get enough of trying to find the perfect placement for my tents and trying to outwit my opponent! And that is precisely where I think the addictive quality of this game lies; growing with the game and your opponent. The tactical nature of the game means that you can get a feel for your opponent's preferences and learn ways to circumvent them. And, by the same token, you have to find ways to keep your opponent from capitalizing on learning about your own tendencies. In this way, the game is very much like chess...a rotating, slide-puzzle chess with multiple scoring options!

soblue


soblue 1. More powers!
I really wish there were more than 3 (with two players) different powers in the game. I know that this is probably the area most suited to expansion and will probably be the focus of any upcoming expansions, but I do wish that the base game came with a few more powers to mix things up from game to game.

soblue 2. Scales strangely
With two players, the order in which you select tiles each round simply alternates. With more players, the process depends on the power tiles you had in the previous round, which seems to put a bit more emphasis on and give a bit more interest to the powers tiles.

Also, with two players, the game has a great balance of tactics and strategy. You have a decent level of control over how the tiles shift and move and which temples and ruins are available to be discovered. More players=more chaos when it comes to the board state. I personally dislike chaos. Intensely.

Final Word


Dearest Dokmus, What are you!? I spent a long time thinking about just what it is about this game that draws me to compulsively play it over and over again and I think it has to be the sheer simplicity of its system and ease of setup. It's just so easy to pull it out and play! And because of the simplicity of the system, turns are quick, so you are engaged in the proceedings at all times! Plus, the fact that the board state is changing all the time means that you have to constantly pay attention and calculate and re-calculate your moves. And yet your options are simple and moves are few, so you don't have to take forever to do this!

Dokmus is a delight! That is what it is! It's like a beautiful jar of Nutella! I know! I know! PALM OIL! CANCER! Well, it's simple and delicious and I could literally eat an entire jar with a spoon (provided I could eat sugar at this point in my life, but at one point, I could AND DID!)! And I could eat (I mean, PLAY) Dokmus ALL DAY! Simple and tasty on its own! Over and over again!

MINA'S LOVE METER heart heart heart heart heart ALL LOVE ALL THE TIME


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First Impressions




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Hi! My name is Mina and I am a dairy addict! I live off a delicious combination of yogurt, kefir, skyr, milk, and cheese, as well as the occasional protein bar of whey protein isolate! I'm about 100% milk! So, whenever I'm asked about underused themes in board games, my response is always identical - CHEESE!!!! We need more games about cheese! And Dairyman is pretty close to just that! Dairyman is a light, push-your-luck, dice-rolling game.

Each turn, you roll a set of dice and find any sets of 2 or 3 dice with pips adding up to EXACTLY 10. You can assign any number of sets of dice that add up to 10 to the first barn and then either continue to re-roll dice or use the total value of the pips you have made to collect milk. If you continue rolling and manage to make additional sets adding up to 10, you will assign your next sets to the second barn. If you fail to make additional sets that add up to 10, you will forfeit your turn and take a red mark token! There are only 3 of these in a 2-player game and once all are taken, the player with 2 of them has to discard his highest-valued milk tile. So, rolling multiple times comes with the risk of failure and failure may lead you to lose a milk tile...if you fail more than your opponent. However, the advantage of rolling multiple times is that you can gain freeze tokens when you reach the third barn (i.e. once you've re-rolled at least 3 times). Freeze tokens let you either "freeze" dice prior to re-rolling on future turns OR let you turn milk into ice cream, with will give you super special powers, like re-rolling all dice of a specific value or a single die of any value. Also, ice cream and cheese can't be taken away by having 2 red mark tokens!

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Milk and cheese and ice cream! All the goodness!

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Barns and milky drinks and freezes and red tokens of doom and gloom...but they do let you roll an extra red die as long as you have them, so they aren't all bad...


Once you finish rolling, you may claim any of the 3 milk tiles on display, with their values denoting their point value at the end of the game.

The game ends when the milk tile display cannot be refilled and the winner is the player with the highest value of milk, ice cream, and cheese in his possession!

Dairyman is light and pleasant and when I'm up for some dice with a milky coating, I'll be sure to pull it out! I love push-your-luck games and this one creates a lot of tension with its dice-rolling chaos! Do you take a chance on being able to fill another barn or do you take a sure thing by placing two sets of 10 in the current one and taking a milk tile? More rolls can bring you superpowers and flexibility, but they can also bite you in the butt if you happen to fail to produce milk! Peter and I tend to be risk averse (though this is much more true for Peter than it is for me) and never once exhausted the "red mark" supply in our two games, but we did both end up with at least one of these in each game. Simple, quick, and effective. I like this! Excited to play more!

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Santorini captured the imagination of many with its elaborate and well-designed Kickstarter campaign and outstanding production. Of course, I was not immune to its charms!

In Santorini, you contribute to the building of the magical island of Santorini by moving your little builder dudes around and calling on your patron God's power for inspiration! Each turn, you MUST move ONE of your two builders AND build a piece of Santorini OR YOU PERISH IN THE FLAMES OF...loss. Your builders can move to any orthogonally and diagonally adjacent spaces and may move one level upward or any number of levels downward. And you can build a ground-floor flat or add a second or third floor or a blue top to a building. Your goal in moving and building is to get one of your builders to the third floor of a building! Because...um...because the first to the pirate lookout spot wins the glory of all the Santorini-ites! Santorini residents!

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Santorini is a delight! And the God powers MAKE the game! I keep wanting to play it over and over again because I want to discover how all the various God powers work and interact. They are quite different from each other and they drastically affect how you play the game. In our first game, I had a power that prevented Peter's builders from building anything adjacent to my builders, which meant I was playing a very defensive game, trying to keep him from being able to do things. Meanwhile, his power allowed him to zip around more easily, which meant he was playing more offensively. It was great! I can't wait to play again! I don't think I'd be nearly as enthused without the powers, but with SO MANY in the game, I think this one will keep me busy for a long time to come!

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Rome: City of Marble is a game I have been eager to play sine it was released at Essen 2015. However, being a relatively generic-looking tile-layer, it never made it to the top of my wishlist. And even after I finally acquired it, it fell to the bottom of my need-to-play list. It looks forgettable and generic. And that is its greatest flaw. The game itself is absolutely brilliant!

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Rome: City of Marble is a tile-laying game reminiscent of Carcassonne. But advanced. You and your friends compete to make the greatest contribution to the building of Rome by reserving the best areas of land, building the best buildings, and connecting these buildings to fountains and aqueducts.

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Each turn, you must perform two actions and may spend Imperium tiles to perform additional actions. Your actions can consist of any combination of:
1. Draw two different colored city tiles and place them in the "prep" space on your player board. You can place these on the board on your next turn.
2. Expand aqueducts, adding 2 pieces to the existing aqueduct system.
3. Recall one of your magistrates from a city tile.
4. Play a city tile onto the board, connecting to existing city tiles or to existing hill tiles. You can cover river spaces to claim river tiles, which will give you straight-up VP at the end of the game. Whenever you place a city tile, you MAY place one of your magistrates on it. If you create a complete pentagon by placing a city tile, the center pentagon becomes a building, the color of which is determined by the number of tiles that contribute to making the pentagonal shape. The player with the most magistrates on city tiles of the building's color gets to claim the building by placing one of his cubes on it and then all players with magistrates on the tiles contributing to the pentagram may move them to the imperium tiles to gain one of the same color as the building that was just completed.

The game ends when two stacks of city tiles are exhausted. You gain points for buildings, river tiles you collected during the game, 2 bonus points for each of your buildings connected to an aqueduct, 1 point per fountain adjacent to your buildings, coins, and 5 bonus points per Imperium tile color in which you have a majority.

First of all, let me be very clear about how much I LOVE this game! LOVE! It's brilliant! For a seemingly simple and abstract tile-laying game, you have much to consider. You have to
a) race for building ownership while managing your meager city-tile supply,
b) you think about the way in which buildings are being combined in order to ensure you are placing your magistrates on the right colored tiles and the colors are related to the number of tiles contributing to the pentagon,
c) you have a tradeoff between building in the Eastern part of the city (easy access to aqueducts) and Western part of the city (random point tile acquisition),
d) you have a tradeoff between ease of completion and VP gain when it comes to number of city tiles contributing to a building
e) you have to think about which building colors you are using to move your magistrates to the Imperium tile section and which Imperium tile colors you are using for extra actions because 5VP per majority is a huge number of points.

Ok. Now for the bad stuff. The rulebook is a mess of mathematics language, poor layout, and lack of illustration. To be fair, this is a relatively complex game. It isn't quite as it first appears. It is much more complex than the average Carcassonne clone. But it is so badly explained in the book. It's hard to explain and I'm sure I've done a shoddy job of it myself, but somebody who got paid to do it should have done better. I think.

Ultimately, Rome: City of Marble came as a huge surprise! I had some expectations, but after reading the rules, those expectations burned to nothing. And then I played the game! And it was engaging, fast paced, and fabulous! So there! Rewrite the rulebook, snazz up the art and this baby is going places! Just kidding. Definitely check this out if you love a good, challenging tile layer! It is worth your time!

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I love Flip City! It's a push-your-luck deck-building game in which you try to be the first to score 8 VP. You play cards directly from the top of your deck and decide whether to stop or continue. But you cannot continue if you ever have 3 unhappies in your city, unless you have unhappiness-cancelling churches, of course!

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Wilderness starting deck


Once you have played all the cards you want to play, you use the coins on your buildings to buy additional building cards to add to your deck or to upgrade existing cards in your discard pile by flipping them over. You win the game if you manage to play 8 points worth of cards in a single turn!

Flip City: Wilderness is a standalone version of Flip City with identical rules and a few more card functions. Some cards have effects that take place only when you first purchase them, giving you an unappiness-cancelling happy for the following turn or allowing you to make an additional upgrade and giving you additional coins with which to do so.

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New buildings side 1

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New buildings side 2


Overall, I enjoyed playing with Wilderness, but I wouldn't recommend using it as a standalone game. Peter and I played this twice - once as a standalone game and once mixed with the base game and Reuse buildings. For me, there aren't enough options in Wilderness to make for a very a compelling game. With four stacks of building tiles that have relatively limited "when played" effects (because these are replaced by "when bought" effects), you just don't have enough to do. For me. But I have played the base game of Flip City many times and have played the base game with the Reuse expansion both with Peter and solo, so I crave more from my city flipping experience! I'm sure this would be just as good an introduction to the system as the base game alone for new players! So, welcome to the world, new Flip City!

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WIN!

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Session Reports


Habitats
I will never tire of this beautiful puzzly tile-layer! In fact, I seriously considered putting it on my top 10 of 2016 and SHOULD have put it in the honorable mentions. I love it that much.

In this game, I tried to make effective use of the lookout tiles. I typically ignore them or do everything I can to avoid having to take them. They seem to be the greatest liability in the game. And yet, I made one work very well for me this time! Lesson of the day: lookout tiles are NOT evil!

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Russian Railroads + Russian Railroads: American Railroads
I am loving Russian Railrads with the American expansion! GO AMERICA!

I went for the middle track because I just love the point scoring potential there! I also focused on the stock track, as I did last time. I figure, the game wouldn't present you with this big 'ol board if you were intended to ignore it, so I plan to always do my best to make my company go up that thing! Plus, the bonuses (both action and end-game VP) are enough to convince me that it's a good goal to have. I ended up winning again and I will attribute that entirely to the stocks!

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


Dream Home
Dream Home!

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I tried to keep the garages away from Peter THE ENTIRE GAME! I cannot tolerate his getting to the truck before me! And I knew I couldn't get it this time because one of the first cards I got was Laundry Room. I failed. Peter got truck.

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BUT I WON THE GAME! BWAHAHAHAH


Suburbia + Suburbia Inc
Suburbia! When I suggested we play this, Peter actually asked me whether it was his birthday! It's one of his favorite games ever and we hardly play it. Earlier, this was caused by my tiring of it, but now, it's caused by my having to get through so many new games to review! Well, we played this week and it was all kinds of fun! It's easy to forget how amazing these "non-hotness" games are, but I don't think we should. Suburbia should forever be in our hearts. And collections!

If you don't already know this, Peter and I play Suburbia with an open-goal variant. We don't use any secret goals; we just leave 3 open goals. That reduces the luck and weirdo guessing part of Suburbia I just don't like. One of the goals in this game rewarded having the fewest residential tiles, which challenged us to find alternative sources of population. So, both of our suburbs ended up with lots of culture to ostensibly draw population from surrounding cities. Or perhaps our single residential tiles were as densely populated as Hong Kong or Tokyo .

I ended up 2 points ahead of Peter at the end, but he managed to shed more cash than I did in the final turn and took the 10-population least-$ goal. Oh well. I take solace in the knowledge that my suburb was not shaped like the contents of Lance Armstrong's boxers.

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From gallery of milenaguberinic
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Touria
Touria continues to disappoint me and I continue to play it! I actually quite dislike this game. It's adorable and harmless enough, but it is SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO random. Between drawing gems from the bag and rolling the die to determine which color of gem will allow you to steal hearts from the dragon, you are already faced with a frustrating amount of randomness. Add to that the uber random tile flipping at the end and you have a game I don't ever want to see again. ACTUALLY, scratch that. I would play this with kids. I think they'd get a kick out of it. It's definitely better than Candyland . Also, the tower action-selection thing IS awesome. I will try to write a full review for this soon.

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


Villages of Valeria
Villages of Valeria continues to entertain! I wrote a review last week and played it a bunch and I still want to play it! And that's a good sign! Unfortunately, I failed to follow my own advice to focus on taking as much advantage of the following option as possible and ended up 8 points behind Peter. Villages being a race game means it is VITAL to maximize the number of actions you have by ensuring you are able to follow your opponent's actions. And I didn't do that. At all. I kept building, maxing out my resources, and watching as Peter built his gigantic empire , recruiting the EXACT adventurers I wanted a turn before I could and ending the game when I had only 7 cards in my tableau. Oh well. I was actually surprised to find that I didn't lose as badly as I had anticipated when we finally tallied the points.

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


Great Western Trail
Great Western Trail is always a great time! In this game, I really wanted to focus on buildings, but the construction dudes didn't start to appear until late in the game, so I was unable to do that. Instead, I focused on cowboys and Peter focused on the conductors. And yet, despite the lack of construction dudes, we managed to nearly fill the board with buildings between the two of us! And Great Western Trail is always made greater by an abundance of buildings!

I was convinced that Peter would win this game. We were even in most categories, but I failed to make it to San Francisco, which meant I had to lose 3 points, and it seemed to me that he had done better at buying cows. I was wrong. I ended up winning by 10 points!

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From gallery of milenaguberinic


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Fresh Cardboard


1. Clans of Caledonia - This looks sooo good! A mid/heavy-weight economic game with variable player powers, route building ( YAY!), and a reasonable play time!? SIGN. ME. UP. I'll be doing a Kickstarter preview for this when the prototype arrives. Hopefully soon!
2. Colt Express - I didn't get the physical version of this game. I got the app! That means I can actually play it. And I have a feeling I will actually enjoy the app version more than I could ever enjoy the physical version.
3. Path of Light and Shadow - I signed up to do some play testing for this game because I played the prototype at BGG Con and LOVED IT! I can't wait to try it with two! Of course, it's still in the prototype stage and doesn't look nearly as pretty as it will when it's complete (Beth Sobel art!!!), BUT there is some art and the non-art parts look decent, so yay!

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Next Week...


I'm not 100% sure that I will have a post next week. I am going to be attending PAX South in San Antonio starting Thursday morning. I will do my best to post a review and some session reports and if I do post a review, it will definitely be for Round House. If not a review, maybe a top 10 anticipated of 2017? Would anyone be interested in that? Also, if you get to PAX South, be sure to say hi if you see me!

***


heart THANK YOU FOR READING heart


Board Game: Round House

For next week!
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