Boardgame 'Science' - a Meta-list
Recommend
75 
 Thumb up
1.25
 tip
 Hide
Hidden between the immense number of geeklists and forum threads, there are some discussions of more theoretical aspects of boardgames. Besides these theoretical perspectives, a large number of statistical analyses have been published on BGG. Some of these have a rather scientific approach, others are less serious.

This list is an attempt to index the most interesting serious geeklists and forum threads on the nature and theory of boardgames, and on game and gamer classification. The list is a work in progress. There is still much to dig up in the archives of BGG and whenever I find something worthwhile, I'll add it to this list. Because of the rather limited functionality of the forum search, the list focuses on geeklists for now. I hope to add more forum threads later.

The list is divided into five chapters:
1) The nature of boardgames: theoretical perspectives on (aspects of) games
2) Boardgame classification theory
3) Game genre definitions
4) Statistical approaches to classification of boardgames and gamers
5) Discussions of mechanics

Please note, that this list is not intended to be complete (which would be impossible), but merely to list what I think are the most interesting / useful / worthwhile contributions to a more serious discussion of the nature of boardgames.
Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: Reference [+] design [+] materials [+] [View All]
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »    |  
1. Board Game: Queries 'n Theories [Average Rating:6.90 Unranked]
Board Game: Miscellaneous Game Book


chapter 1.

The nature of boardgames: theoretical perspectives on (aspects of) games
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Definition
hobitti (2007) defines games by means of the following criteria in this very recent geeklist:

1)Dynamic interaction between the players
2)It has to have explicit rules: the winner has to be determined by the rules
3)Player has to have a possibility to affect the game: make decisions that will determine the winner
4)It can't be illegal or controversial: ethically or logically


Other users responded and proposed alternative definitions.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Game Design: Theory and Practice
A very theoretical discussion of the nature and dimensions of games by myself (2006).

Game type space is a set of three-dimensional spaces in a two-dimensional (nominal) matrix.
1. dimension 1: theme, subject, etc. (level - ratio scale)
2. dimension 2: luck, randomness, etc. (level - ratio scale)
3. dimension 3: complexity (level - ratio scale)
4. vector 1: theme, subject, etc. (type - nominal scale)
5. vector 2: mechanic* (type - nominal scale)


This list was partly inspired by and based on the following two items in this geeklist:
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Fortress America
This thread was mainly a rather boring argument between fans of the 'Ameritrash' and 'Euro' genres, but interwoven with that argument, there is a very interesting discussion between ibn_ul_khattab, clearclaw, and a few others on the nature of games in general and the meaning of the concept of "theme" in particular.

In my afore mentioned geeklist (Notes on game classification theory), I summarised this discussion:
Ibn_ul_khattab argued that games are decision spaces and themes are their subjective characters. A game is a set of logico-mathematical rules that constitute a 'space' in which players make decisions in accordance to those rules. The rules are the cosmology of the game. Similarly, the key concepts of the game constitute it's ontology (the things (actors, units, events, etc.) that exist within the framework of that game). "Theme" - in the opinion of ibn_ul_khattab - is the subjective character of this cosmology and ontology. Although there indeed is such a subjective character for each game - gamer combination, this is not what is generally called "theme". Since the term "theme" is already in use in this language-game (context), I don't think it is useful to use the term for a game's character. Let's just call that 'character'.
Clearclaw, on the other hand, suggested that for games "theme" is usually defined as a social and/or cultural context applied to the presentation of a game. Interestingly, "theme" in this sense could be regarded as a special case of character. "Theme" is the narrative context or foundation of the cosmology and ontology of the game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Tip the Scale
In this list, MattDP (2005) lists games 'ranked by how much their theme, as opposed to their mechanics, contribute to an enjoyable game experience.'

MattDP distinguished 7 levels:
Scale 1: All Mechanic and no Theme
Scale 2: Light Themeing that could be lost
Scale 3: Light Integral Theme
Scale 4: Balanced Theme and Mechanics
Scale 5: Theme starts to dictate Mechanics
Scale 6: Theme interferes with Mechanics
Scale 7: All Chrome

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Unbelievable!
The Unbeliever (2007) wrote an extensive post on games as possibility spaces in this win-a-game contest thread. You can find his post here.

In response to Will Wright's comment that:
Fun is the process of discovering areas in a possibility space.
The Unbeliever wrote:
I really like this concept, and I think it provides a good way to think about why people enjoy particular types of games. To expand on this concept, I'll define three dimensions of possibility space:
Depth or Challenge: This is a measure of the complexity of the paths through the possibility space.
(...)
Width or Variety: This is a measure of the number of distinct routes available through a possibility space.
(...)
Height or Atmosphere: This is a measure of how interesting the scenery and terrain is along the paths of the possibility space.
(...)

There's a brief response to The Unbeliever by Clearclaw here.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Tigris & Euphrates
Another excellent geeklist discussion on the relationship between theme and mechanics by Fawkes (2004).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
 Missing Image
What makes a good boardgame? This list is about game design principles: overarching goals that every boardgame should strive for. Please help identify the most important game design principles.

By FlyingArrow (2008).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Kill Doctor Lucky
Luck seems to be one of the most widely discussed aspects of games on boardgamegeek. There are many forum threads and geeklists on the subject. This thread, started by bncconry (2006), discusses an article on the subject by Richard Garfield and the role of luck and randomness in games in general.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
10. Item is no longer in our database
Board Game: Miscellaneous Game Accessory
Godeke (2006) introduced the 'Luck Quotient' to describe the level of randomness in games.

One of the aspects that seems to separate different types of gamers is the amount of luck they are willing to withstand in the games they play. There have been a lot of discussions about luck, but I was thinking about how you *quantify* luck into a firm value. (...)
I would like to propose the "Luck Quotient" or LQ. What is the LQ? Well, it simply represents the percent of games where the winner was determined by luck, not skill. (...)
* Assume that a game is one determined totally by random chance. We want this game to have a LQ of 100%. For convenience, we will simply call these games "Pure Gambling". (...)
* Assume that a game is without random elements. Only the wits and skills of the players matter here. We want this game to have a LQ of 0%. (We will ignore things like "I wasn't feeling well that day" as not being Luck). For convenience, we will simply call this game "Total Knowledge Abstracts" and it is akin to multiplayer chess. (...)
In this case, we want to assume that one player is an "expert" at the game: equivalent to a Grandmaster at chess in Skill and Knowledge (yes, caps: this guy is *good*). The remaining players will be assumed to be "newbies" at the game: they will play the game according the the rules, but they will apply virtually no long range strategies or tactics. (...)
In the case of the total knowledge abstract, the expert should win every such game if the LQ is 0%: their chance of winning is simply 1, regardless of N.
This latter fact gives us a way to formulate a percentage that meets our criteria. Let me introduce the LQ formula:
p - Chance that our expert will win.
n - Number of players.
LQ = n /(n-1) * (1 - p)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
11. Thread: Chaos Theory
Board Game: Chaos
A series of 2004 BBGBlogs by Fawkes on luck, randomness and chaos.

Games fall somewhere between two extremes, the "interactive puzzles" featuring no random factors other than the personalities of the players (i.e., Chess), and the complete chaos games where no interesting decisions can be made, other than to bet on the outcome (i.e., LCR). Everything falls in between, from games like Puerto Rico (2P Puerto Rico is a heartbeat away from Chess), to Can't Stop (which is simply "playing the odds" and "pushing your luck" against the bell curve).
It is likely that game designers add chaos into games to make them more interesting; i.e., a game that plays out the same way every time is boring. Therefore, chaos is added - an element that no player can directly control, but all players must take into account when playing the game.


part II: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/51331
part III: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/51373
part IIIb: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/51374
reactions to responses: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/51375
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Great Board Games
topherr (2007) lists the 10 things that make a game great:

1. Ratio of Strategy to Rule Complexity
2. Replayability
3. Player Interaction
4. Ability to Come from Behind
5. Ratio of Player Control to Luck
6. Lack of Analysis Paralysis
7. Plays Well with Different Groups
8. Clear Rules
9. Originality
10. Theme


(More 'things' were added later by topherr and other users.)

In the end there's obviously no one thing that makes a great game. Still, my starting point (see #1 below) is that the best measure of a game is:
The number and quality of interesting decisions to make per minute.


Many other users responded, which resulted in some interesting discussions.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: The Art of Wargaming
Aermord (2005) applies the theories of Sun Tzu to wargames.

The art of war, then, is governed by five constant factors, to be taken into account in one’s deliberations, when seeking to determine the conditions obtaining in the field.
These are:
(1) The Moral Law;
(2) Heaven;
(3) Earth;
(4) The Commander;
(5) Method and discipline.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Psychologizer
statonv, Octavian and a few others discuss the very limited possibilities for real scientific work on boardgames, focusing on the psychology of games, in this 2005 thread.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Who? What? Where?
ynnen (2006) 'takes a look at how games decide who gets to do what during the course of the game'.

In a great many games, players have complete, unfettered freedom to do what they want within the confines of the rules -- they can select any action at any time, performed in any order they choose. But other games have distinct limitations or structured guidelines that must be followed.
Sometimes these restrictions create opportunities for strategy, while other times they railroad a game toward an inevitable conclusion.
(...)
Some games certainly feature more than just one element, as well... Games which offer several tiers of strategy or are broken down into many different phases or rounds may often feature different elements at different points in the game -- requiring players to effectively adapt to the different means employed.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
16. Item is no longer in our database
Board Game: Category Game



chapter 2.

Boardgame classification theory


Of course some of the items above deal with game classification as well, especially the geeklists Notes on game classification theory and A Scale: Theme vs Mechanics, but those cover a far broader topic, while the items in this second chapter focus on actual classification alone.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Categorically Speaking
MattDP (2006) suggests 19 categories of games.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: The Secret of the Bitter Sweets
This geeklist by Randy Cox (2005) classifies games and gamer types by means of hypothetical 'sweet spots', sets of 5 numbers - average, standard deviation, votes, weight, and hours - that define a genre. He distinguishes 13 types of games / gamers:

Demanding Niche Gamer (10.0-0.00-100-5.00-4)
Those who enjoy Gamer Games (8.00-1.00-1000-3.5-1.5)
Mainstream Geek Gamer (7.5-1.2-1000-2-1)
Lighter Gamers (7.00-1.35-1000-1.5-1)
People who want their games Really Light & Trendy (6.5-1.35-5554-1-1)
Our Nongaming Friends (4.5-1.75-500-1-0.5)
Discerning Non-Gamer (6-1.75-1000-1-0.5)
Heavyweight Perfectionist Gamer (10-X-X-5-X)
Heavyweight Uberperfectionist (10-0-X-5-0)
Middleweight Perfectionisth (10-X-X-3-X)
Middleweight Uberperfectionist (10-0-X-3-0)
Lightweight Perfectionist (10-X-X-1-X)
Lightweight Uberperfectionist (10-0-X-1-0)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
19. Board Game: 6 nimmt! [Average Rating:6.91 Overall Rank:604]
Board Game: Gamer Tycoon


chapter 3.

Game genre definitions


While some of the items below also deal with game classification in general, they all focus strongly on a particular genre, type, or class of boardgames.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Age of Steam
In this geeklist, ynnen (2005) discussed the meaning of the concept of "heaviness" or "weight" when it comes to games.

First and foremost, I think heaviness, like beauty, is often in the eye of the beholder. It's a personal metric combining gameplay preferences, experience comparisons and complexity thresholds.

The first three characteristics of heaviness he mentions are:
Significant Impact of Decisions
Inter-connectedness of Decisions
Numerous Available Options/Actions
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Car Wars
I made this geeklist in 2006 in response to the discussion on the concept of "Ameritrash". The list deals with game classification in general, but focuses mainly on "Ameritrash" and the (perceived) subgenres thereof. It also tries to clarify some misunderstandings about Ameritrash.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
22. Item is no longer in our database
Board Game: Civilization
In this 2006 geeklist, I introduced the genre label "Euro-American intermediate" (EAI). As the label suggests, EAIs are in between modern eurogames and traditional lots-of-counters-and-insane-rulebooks American games.

Euro-American intermediates (EAIs):
- have intermediate theme strength, meaning that they are strongly themed and rules and mechanisms as realistically as possible capture this theme, but not to the extent that they are historical simulations;
- have, therefore, relatively complex rules, but very few or no special cases or exceptions to simulate real history;
- may have some luck, but bad luck only has limited effects;
- have intermediate to long play times (at least 3 hrs.).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
23. Board Game: Head Full of Numbers [Average Rating:6.50 Unranked]
 Missing Image



chapter 4.

Statistical approaches to classification of boardgames and gamers
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Board Game: Typo
mkgray's (2007) cluster analysis of gamers based on their top 10s. Depending on the number of clusters, gamers are classified as follows:

3-cluster
Core Eurogamers (62%)
Family Eurogamers (27%)
Amerigamers (11%)

5-cluster
Eurogamers-1 (52%)
Eurogamers-2 (19%)
Eurogamers-3 (13%)
Amerigamers-1 (10%)
Amerigamers-2 (6%)

9-cluster
Euro Alpha (30%)
Euro Beta (20%)
Euro Gamma (16%)
Euro Delta (9%)
Euro Epsilon (6%)
Euro Zeta (6%)
Ameri Alpha (7%)
Ameri Beta (4%)
Misc (4%)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
25. Item is no longer in our database
Board Game: Bear Buddies
A statistical analysis of the results of Sky Knight X's (2006) Geeklist / questionnaire How Do You Feel About Perceived Gaming Negatives? (http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/15500) by Lajos (2006).

Sky Knight X asked BGG members how they feel about:
Luck/Randomness/Chaos
Unbalance
Downtime/Analysis Paralysis
Kingmaking
Runaway leader
Bash the leader
Lack of Player Interaction
Player elimination
Long game time
Fiddly/Clunky
Lack of theme
Cheap Bits/Presentation/Artwork
Poor rulebook


63 users responded. This geeklist statistically analyses those responses. It presents a cluster analysis of gamers and shows that the only significant difference between US gamers and those from the rest of the world is that for American gamers player elimination is far less of a concern than for gamers from the rest of the world.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
1 , 2  Next »    |  
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
1 , 2  Next »    |