The DIY / PnP games I've actually printed and played
Mattias Frid
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I've found that I'm quite fond of assembling DIY-games. While searching for suitable games, I've had some problems finding certain information - such as materials needed, how much assembly is required, how many sheets of paper and foam core will I need to use and so forth. Furthermore, sometimes it's hard to know wether it's worth the hassle or not to print out a game. A game might be worth printing even if it's not very good, if you can print for free and don't have to spend much time assembling it.

Thus I created this list. I will add to it over time, hopefully it will aid others in assembling downloaded games.

I print most of the stuff at work, where we have a nice A3 colour laser printer thus I'm not factoring in printing cost when I'm assessing whether a game is worth printing or not.

The games are listed in chronological order, my first DIY attempt as #1 and so forth.

The image for each list entry is either an image of my implementation of the game, or a picture of the game box.
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1. Board Game: SeaRovers [Average Rating:7.67 Overall Rank:8454]
Mattias Frid
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Assembly time: A little less than an hour for the game board.
Assembly hassle level: 3 of 5 - the board is far from easy to align and there are a lot of cards.

This was my first Print and Play game attempted, and I'm glad I took a short cut with it. When purchasing the game, I struck a deal with Van (the designer) to print the cards and I would print the other resources myself. As it contains 136 cards, I figured it'd be the easiest option for me. I printed the manual and game board myself, and purchased pewter ship miniatures on eBay. I also managed to get plastic pirate dubloons for a pitance at a toy store. While looking a bit less historically correct than the dubloon chits coming with the game, I prefer the plastic coins. They're shiny!

What did I actually print and construct?
I printed and mounted the board on matte board (ie thick card board). I (ofcourse) printed the manual. I bought plastic pirate booty (ie coins) instead of printing those. I also purchased pewter ships.

What materials did I use up?
I used half a sheet of matte board, roughly amounting to an A1 sheet in size. Apart from that it was just paper for the printer and ink. Six colour A4 print-outs for the board. About 10 black and white pages for the rule book (I didn't print the excellent history parts - sorry Van!). Had I been printing the cards, there would've been another 16 pages of colour printouts (32 if I'd printed the card backs).

Any tips on construction?
I made two big mistakes with the board. First off, I didn't get the six pages aligned properly when mounting the board. I think it would've been easier if I hadn't trimmed them so much and instead had them overlapping each other a bit. The second mistake was to mount it on a solid sheet. Now it's not only a bit fugly, but a bugger to store as well. It does the job to play on though, and still looks lovely all thanks to Van Overbay's mad designer skillz!

As I didn't get the playing pieces either, I first purchased some pewter mini ships on eBay that were multi part. I kind of wish I hadn't. These models were obviously designed for people with the tiniest little light elf fingers in the world. Glueing the masts to the hulls was a pain, and the end result was crooked to begin with but after our first game all ships looked like they'd come out of a hurricane. I've ordered other one-piece pewter ships now and look forward to using them instead.

Conclusion
Doing the game was completely worth it though, it's a great game with just oozing with a nice piratey mood. I'm looking forward to the coming retail edition and will definitely get that! In the meantime I'll print the new second edition of the game.

RECOMMENDED!
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2. Board Game: Dungeon Bash [Average Rating:6.69 Unranked]
Mattias Frid
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Assembly time: Several hours
Assembly hassle level: 3 of 5 - Doors are a bit fiddly and there are several map tiles where you struggle to get neat edges, but it's pretty smooth sailing. The sheer volume of cutting to do raises the hassle level by 1 though...

What did I actually print and construct?
I printed the basic floor tiles (14 pages), the rule book (34 pages) and monster reference book (86 pages) and also the reference sheets and character sheets (roughly 30 pages). I also printed the counter sheets (3 pages), but found them too dull and used the plastic pre-painted D&D miniatures instead.

What materials did I use up?
17 pages A4 in colour (tiles and counters), roughly 75 double sided A4 pages in black and white (rules, reference sheets, monster reference etc). 1 large sheet (about the size of an A0)

Any tips on construction?
I cut out rough shapes of the floor tiles and mounted them on one large sheet of foam core before cutting them up. I would recommend also cutting up the foam core sheet before mounting as the size of the large sheet added to the hassle. I guess it took me about 2 hours to do this.

Don't cut the doors with a knife, it's easier to do it with scissors and it's straight enough. I didn't bother mounting the doors, I just cut them out, applied some glue and folded them up. Not mounting them means you can easily position them beneath and between map tiles, but they are a bit flimsy.

If you print the tiles, I strongly recommend mounting them on foam core. They're 100% flat all the time, sit really well next to each other and don't warp or get wobbly like cardstock can do.

Conclusion
Was it worth it? Yeah, I think so... I've had great fun with it. It's an odd release though, since you can't play it without the D&D rules (which ARE freely available, but still). It's more of an add-on to D&D, than a game in itself. Thus I find it hard to recommend it to anyone not willing to invest quite a lot of time and energy into the game.

NOT SO SURE...
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3. Board Game: Dawn of the Dead [Average Rating:5.97 Overall Rank:7052]
Mattias Frid
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Assembly time: Less than 1 hour.
Assembly hassle level: 1 of 5 - it's dead simple zombie

As an avid Dawn of the Dead fan, this was a no-brainer for me! zombie I downloaded the PnP replica of the game with a new design of board and counters. Check in the links or files section for the game. Take note though... The game is not actually public domain and hasn't been released by SPI for free online.

What did I actually print and construct?
I printed a prototype of this game, to see if it was any fun. The game board was printed on an A3 sheet of paper and laminated. The counters I printed on thick A4 paper, which I then folded and glued together with spray adhesive and cut up. With less than 100 counters, this was done in less than an hour.

What materials did I use up?
An A3 sheet colour (board), 1 A4 sheet colour (counters), 9 A4 sheet black and white (rules and reference sheet)

Any tips on construction?
Before printing the counters, I created a new A4 sized document in Photoshop, where I then aligned the front and back counters (which come in separate files). After printing, I could easily spray glue and then fold the sheet to have perfectly aligned fronts and backs.

It's a good idea to print an extra batch or two of "Closed" counters, as it's easy to run out of those if you're a compulsory door closer like me.

Conclusion
The game was great fun compared to the amount of effort, so I will print up a nicer copy with a larger game board and thicker counters "some time soon"... I'm also planning on doing a player aide.

RECOMMENDED!
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4. Board Game: Barbarian Prince [Average Rating:6.49 Overall Rank:3611]
Mattias Frid
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Assembly time:Less than an hour.
Assembly hassle level: 1 of 5 - pretty much no assembly required.

Here's one I really haven't gotten into even though I've tried several times.

What did I actually print and construct?
I printed the board on an A3 and laminated it. The rules and event book were printed and spiral bound (a benefit of printing DIY games at the office).

What materials did I use up?
1 A3 sheet in colour (game board) and 34 pages black and white for the rules, event book and other stuff.

Any tips on construction?
Laminate the game track! That way, you can use dry erase markers instead of counters.

Conclusion
Not overwhelmed by the result. The scan of the map is pretty dodgy. Also, as I haven't been able to bring myself to play it I don't feel it was worth it - but your mileage may differ. It's really easy to "assemble" so try it if you're interested.

NOT SO SURE...
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5. Board Game: Lost Patrol [Average Rating:6.47 Overall Rank:4449]
Mattias Frid
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Assembly time: About two hours
Assembly hassle level: 2 of 5 - It can be a bit hard to see the lines of the hexes at times when cutting them if you use the original GW tiles.

I've had my eyes on this for a while. The only thing putting me off printing it was the prospect of cutting up hex tiles. No matter what you do, they won't end up even and/or the same size. I decided to print the original tiles as a prototype to see if the game was worth doing "properly" - and also to try out some new gear (the cling film laminate stuff mentioned below). I'm using proxy minis, as I plan on doing the urban tiles for a zombie themed version of the game and will use minis suitable for that.

What did I actually print and construct?
I printed the GW tiles and rule book. The tiles were mounted on a sheet of thin foam core and then cut out. Before cutting them out, I laminated the sheet with something like cling film. I'm not sure what the material is called in English. The lurker counters were mounted on thick cardboard and cut out in squares.

What materials did I use up?
4 pages A4 in colour (tiles and counters), 2 A4 pages in colour (rules), a little less than an A2 worth of foam core and some left over cardboard.

Any tips on construction?
For a really nice set, I would buy large die-cut hex tiles to get that perfect symmetrical fit. Cutting them manually with a steel ruler, a scalpel and a little care works but it's not stunning.

I'd also recommend the laminating stuff I used. It really did add a nice touch. I'll get the matte stuff though, this roll was glossy and it might be a problem on a gaming table (glare etc).

Once again, I'm on about the foam core. It's bloody awesome as a basing material!

Conclusion
Definitely a nice game which is easily assembled, looks good once done and actually plays well! Get it, you lobster!

RECOMMENDED!
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6. Board Game: Warhammer Quest [Average Rating:7.42 Overall Rank:655]
Mattias Frid
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Assembly time: 4-5 hours of cutting and glueing.
Assembly hassle level: 2 of 5 - Was very simple once I had my master PDFs sorted.

A few years ago, I started collecting Dungeons & Dragons Miniatures from WOTC. It was actually Dungeon Bash that got me started. While a nice game, I never really played Dungeon Bash much, but continued collecting all those miniatures. When I hit the 900 mark I figured I needed to find a place to use them and presto: I downloaded, refined and printed this beauty of a game!

What I got off the net wasn't really printer friendly. I had one PDF with single cards on each page, for instance. My solution to that problem was to make card templates in Photoshop and then manually re-create all cards of the base game with a new design. I re-used the background of the dungeon cards but apart from that it's all new except for the illustrations.

I'm very happy with the result and I've already played several games with my cousin. Found a few typos and once those are fixed I'll probably make my PDFs available.

What did I actually print and construct?
I printed and mounted the board sections on foam core sheets using spray glue.

The cards were printed (single side) on heavy weight paper, not card stock. The plan was to glue them together and get one thick card with the feel of a regular playing card. Bad idea, but more on that in "Lessons learned"... I finally ended up just cutting the cards and stuffing them in plastic sleeves without any glue involved. The result is OK, but it feels much more flimsy.

Then there were the books and counters and so on...

What materials did I use up?
One large sheet of foam core was enough to fit all the floor plans. Apart from that it was mainly printer paper (some 100 sheets dual sided, as I printed the Roleplay Book as well).
For the cards I used thicker paper and colour printing (girlfriend's office). Roughly 30 sheets.

Once again, it's the minis that jack the price up. =)

Any tips on construction?
Don't EVER try to glue two sheets of paper together. It's almost impossible to align them properly and I wasted quite a lot of nice printouts on my attempts with spray glue and glue sticks. From now on, I'll try to print cards on heavier paper dual sided.

Also, I would not advise anyone to start building this unless you already have a bunch of miniatures to use or choose a different source. DDM minis aren't cheap, I think the bats alone set me back $25!

Conclusion
Every minute and cent put into this project was well worth it. I got a fun game to play, where I can use my minis - and I also had an opportunity to clean up my collection. Traded A LOT, and will sell off the remaining 400 spares (ie minis I don't use for WHQ or other DIY projects). I like minimizing my game junk, even if the Mrs would claim the opposite. =)

Also, I had a fun time doing the cards. Been a long time since I did anything like that, so it was fun to brush up on the skills. Next time I'll use Illustrator though. It's a pain to handle texts in Photoshop. =)

This game has defenitely bumped Dungeon Bash off the throne as far as I am concerned when it comes to dungeon crawlers. It's more fun, less hassle and co-op! And your hero can die on a single die roll in town! =D

RECOMMENDED!
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