A Chronology of Faves, part 1 of 6
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Recommend
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
In this series of six lists I'm organizing my favorite games chronologically by date of origin or publication.

This is basically for my own amusement, but if anybody else finds the list interesting, that's fine, too.

Really I'm only doing this because putting the games in this order gave me a different perspective on them. As Ringo Starr joked when a certain compilation of Beatles hits was released on CD, "Sure, you've heard them all before. But you've never heard them in this order before."

What makes me recognize a game as a favorite?

There are two basic criteria:

1. I like it a lot.

2. I play it a lot.

Naturally the first list begins with games of great antiquity.

The second list is http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/42541.
Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: Games [+] [View All]
  • [+] Dice rolls
1. Board Game: Chess [Average Rating:7.09 Overall Rank:421] [Average Rating:7.09 Unranked]
 
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The oldest game on my list of favorites is chess, at least according to BGG which lists it as originating in 1475.

I can't comment intelligently on chess's date of origin. Is 1475 the year they finalized the rule set by adding en passant? I really don't know the history of chess in any detail.

Chess is one of the most widely known games in western civilization. I think I was 6 when my father, as part of my education as a civilized person, began to teach it to me. I never studied the game formally, but in my first year of college I encountered a number of players who were much better at it than I was and managed to achieve a pretty good duffer's knowledge of the game.

My favorite opening is the Queen's Gambit, and I have learned to rely heavily on my pawns.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
2. Board Game: Cribbage [Average Rating:7.03 Overall Rank:557]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Apparently cribbage was first played in 1630, and since we have the designer's name -- the unlikely Sir John Suckling -- it may be that the date is accurate.

Cribbage was a game I had only heard about and never played until the late 1970s when I had a girlfriend who taught it to me. Her brother was in the Navy. Apparently there's a long tradition of cribbage in the Navy. Robert Heinlein was a cribbage player.

A great two-handed card game, cribbage is "merely" a matter of playing the odds as precisely as possible. It has this quality in common with backgammon, but personally I'm much more intrigued by the odds inherent in 13 cards out of the 52 in the deck than I am the rolls of the dice.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
3. Board Game: Schnapsen [Average Rating:6.97 Overall Rank:4284]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Listed as originating in 1715, Schnapsen is part of the family of games including Pinochle and Bézique in which trick-taking is combined with bonuses for melds. There are a number of variations on Schnapsen itself, but the one I learned from Angelika, my girlfriend and partner in life, takes it to such a high polish that I rank the game right up there with cribbage as being a great two-handed game.

The Schnapsen deck uses just the 10, J, Q, K, A of the four suits. Players are dealt five cards, and another card is turned up to be trump. After each trick, players draw back to five cards. They can get bonus points by showing "marriages," Q/K in a suit, when on lead. When the deck is exhausted, the rules of play change. At the beginning of the hand, you don't have to follow suit or trump unless you want to, but when the deck runs out, you not only have to follow suit but have to win the trick if you can, and no more marriages can be declared. If a player thinks it's to his advantage, he can preemptively close the deck, meaning only the five cards currently in hand will be played out and the second-half rules will apply.

Meanwhile the players keep track of their scores in their heads and can end the hand by declaring they've collected the 66 points to win it. Penalties accrue, of course, for an inaccurate claim.

Little known on this side of the Atlantic, Schnapsen entered my purview because Angelika learned it from her parents in Austria.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
4. Board Game: Poker [Average Rating:6.70 Overall Rank:865]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Poker, sez the Geek, originated in 1810.

For me poker originated around fourth grade. I remember studying one of those lists of the order of poker hands printed on a card that came with a deck of poker cards. By eighth grade I'd played a few times for pennies. In my first year of college I sat down to a game where it cost $5 to buy in. A year later I got into a game with my brother-in-law and some friends of his in Katy, Texas, and these turned out to be the best poker players I've ever lost money to.

My favorite kind of poker game is dealer's choice where a lot of high-low games are played. In Katy they played table stakes, pot limit, and used one joker in the deck as a "bug," meaning it's not completely wild but can be used as an ace or as a card to complete a straight, a flush, or a low hand. With aces both high and low, this created many fascinating possibilities for hands that could "go both ways," that is, win as both the high hand and the low hand. The Katy system of declaring high, low, or both ways in strict order from the last player to raise the bet also made for some great poker.

The signature Katy game was one called "Shuck." It's a high-low game that looks like five-card stud, one hole card and four face-up cards with an interval of betting after each face-up card. But then after the fifth card there's an opportunity to discard or "shuck" one of the five cards in exchange for another and a final round of betting.

I've played in a lot of different places and by a lot of different rules, but that was primo poker.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
5. Board Game: Hearts [Average Rating:6.43 Overall Rank:1555]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
BGG says Hearts originated in 1850, and that's where I've positioned it in my chronology, but a case might be made that the game I play and know as Hearts was not actually invented until much later.

The reason I think this might be true is that the Hoyle's Rules of Games we used to live by, once upon a time, always listed "Black Lady" as a variant of Hearts. Well, Black Lady is Hearts played where the Queen of Spades counts 13 points, and that's the way I've always played it and that's the way I think pretty much everybody plays Hearts today. (Of course there are "Jack of Diamonds" and other light-hearted versions, but Queen of Spades everybody agrees on.)

I started playing Hearts because of my participation in Southern Fandom, by which I mean the loose affiliation of science fiction and other fans who coalesced around the DeepSouthCon, the Southern Fandom Press Alliance, and a number of other terrific social and fannish totems in the 1960s and thereafter. Because I read about the epic games of Hearts played by Hank Reinhardt, Lon Atkins, and other heroes of the age, one of the last games I got my parents to play with me before leaving home for college was Hearts. This prepared me for an apprenticeship with the serious players.

Hearts is the only game I can think of that I have played both in serious tournaments and for money -- as much as a nickel a point. Hundreds of games. I haven't played in years.

Southern Fandom rules: Left of dealer leads. Hearts may be broken but not led on the first trick. The Queen of Spades counts as a heart for this purpose and also in the event that it is your lead and you have nothing to lead but hearts even when hearts have not yet been broken. You may ask if hearts have been broken but you may not ask if hearts have been split. When you shoot the moon, you can choose to go negative or to have everyone else go positive.

The serious game of Hearts.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
6. Board Game: Pit [Average Rating:6.40 Overall Rank:1365]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
And with Pit clocking in at 1903, we enter the 20th century.

My mom's family always loved playing games, and one of my earliest childhood memories is of being allowed to join the game with her brother and sisters and their spouses and dates. I learned Pit literally at my mother's knee, as they would let me crawl under the table to secretly sort my hand before calling "Pit's open!"

We have always played Pit in my family. We still play Pit in my family. It's a classic game that everyone can enjoy.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
7. Board Game: Bridge [Average Rating:7.48 Overall Rank:493]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Invented in 1925, bridge is still the classic partnership trick-taking game. There's a competitive auction to determine how many tricks the partnership thinks it can take and with which suit as trump. Then one hand is dummy -- a terrific gimmick that makes it hard to quit playing since you never need a time-out -- and you see if the contract can be made.

Bridge is falling out of fashion because the learning curve is so steep. The fact that a variety of "artificial" bidding systems have been developed which do not rely so much on bids in the suits players actually think would make good trumps discourages students of the game as well. I was fortunate to learn bridge when Standard American was still most players' bidding system of choice. I've played a little bit of duplicate bridge (same hands played by different foursomes) but never took the game so seriously that I tracked "master points." I'll enjoy bridge as a social game as long as there are still other players who do.

I "majored in Bridge" in my first year of college, learning the game from Ralph Anderson and others of its many diehard fans, fellow students who seemed to be constantly looking for a fourth.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
8. Board Game: Monopoly [Average Rating:4.39 Overall Rank:15440]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
BGG says 1935 for Monopoly.

I learned Monopoly from a babysitter -- I'm sure she was acting in self-defense against an imaginatively mischievous child -- when I was 7. The game seemed magical to me. I convinced my parents to buy a copy, and we had a regular Friday night game for a while, a timed game which I well remember finally winning for the first time thanks to a three-railroad combination.

Monopoly is the first game whose rules I read and took to heart. You might say it's the game that made a rules lawyer out of me.

It's a great, classic game of deal-making and speculation and still hits the table from time to time in my circles. It typically takes about an hour and a half to play. Apparently we're old enough not to be part of the general BGG backlash against Monopoly.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
9. Board Game: Canasta [Average Rating:6.36 Overall Rank:2751]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
A few years after the Friday night Monopoly game wore thin, my parents and I took up three-handed Canasta. Later I'd play a fair amount of two-handed and three-handed in Atlanta with Ward Batty and other friends from Southern Fandom.

Canasta was invented in 1939 and for a while was a serious rival of bridge for most popular card game in America. It is a double-deck rummy game with wild cards (a canasta is a meld of 7 of a kind) which makes a fine, maddeningly tense battle for two or three players as well as in the partnership version for four. Before we discovered German games, we even played Canasta with six players and liked it.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
10. Board Game: Scrabble [Average Rating:6.29 Overall Rank:1521]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
From 1948, the crosswords game that has become America's favorite.

It was my grandma's favorite, too. We played many a game. I've played many a game with many a friend over the years. I never had the inclination to become a tournament Scrabble player, but for a duffer, I'm good.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
11. Board Game: Qubic [Average Rating:5.24 Overall Rank:14256]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Listed as originating in 1953, Qubic is no more and no less than three-dimensional 4-x-4-x-4 tic-tac-toe. It's a milestone for this list because it's the year I was born, but I'm sure somebody thought of 3-D tic-tac-toe before 1953.

It became a favorite of mine because my 10th-grade geometry teacher kept a copy of the game in the classroom. I played it many times, especially with Iris Pittman, a major crush for me in 10th grade. If it weren't for her, Qubic probably wouldn't be on this list. Thanks, Iris, and fond memories.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
12. Board Game: Careers [Average Rating:5.79 Overall Rank:4885]
 
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
In 1955 some clever innovation came from Parker Brothers in a game called Careers.

As in Monopoly, you rolled dice to go around the perimeter of the board, but in a new wrinkle, there were inner loops which a player took as a sort of detour from the main track, rolling only one die while engaged in one "career" or another. "Uranium Prospecting" was one of the fad careers in 1955. In later editions a player could sign on for "Ecology" and other timely topics.

The other nice innovation was that the players chose their own "success formulas" at the beginning of the game. Your success could depend more on Stars (Fame) than Hearts (Happiness), or more on Cash. Depending on your formula, you set out in search of particular careers that would be more rewarding in your area of interest.

I only played Careers once as a kid, in eighth grade at Wanda Brewster's house one Sunday night after church. Years later, when I was on the internet and had eBay, I picked up a copy for peanuts and found that it makes a dandy diversion for today's adults. There is little more joke-inspiring than to land on a square that says "Lead Junior Prom, Score 2 Hearts."
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
13. Board Game: Diplomacy [Average Rating:7.06 Overall Rank:503]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Published in 1959, Diplomacy is another game I played for the first time in my first year of college. Later I got involved in the play-by-mail scene and actually published a Dipzine called Hoodwink in the 1990s. I also attended a couple of Diplomacy conventions in Charlotte, North Carolina.

My experience with Diplomacy fandom, which like another group we know was called "the hobby" by many of its devotees, gives me a helpful perspective on gaming fandom in general. Thus I sometimes take the "Why do you assume that it would be a good thing for there to be a lot more people involved in this?" point of view in discussions.

Diplomacy is a terrific game and introduced the concept of simultaneous movement to the world of boardgames -- as far as I know, anyway. If there's an earlier example, it didn't have the staying power of Diplomacy.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
14. Board Game: Password [Average Rating:6.11 Overall Rank:3509]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Now we reach another milestone date, because in 1962 the first game appeared that I actually personally played in the year it came out: Password.

We were already game show fans at my house, but Password really caught on with us for some reason. We bought the home version and played it frequently.

Even nowadays I know people who like to play Password... although there's usually that awkward moment when I have to submit to playing with a "pass or play" option on the first clue, something that didn't exist in the original and something I always seem to guess wrong about.

A classic game.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
15. Board Game: Acquire [Average Rating:7.36 Overall Rank:208]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
1962 also saw the publication of Acquire, although I didn't see Acquire until the next decade. We didn't know then that it was the signature game of designer Sid Sackson. We just knew it was a darned clever game, different from anything else we played.

From 1989 to present, my six-man game group in Atlanta has played a couple of tons of Acquire. In 1989, of course, there simply weren't that many good six-player games available in America, so for a while we played Acquire practically every week. Naturally we ran variations: payouts for third place, partnerships, playing two tiles on a turn, etc. We got extremely good at the game, so good that we knew what to do with the tiles if we got them and winning became more or less a matter of whether we got the necessary tiles. I take the point of view that a whole game of Acquire is thus comparable to a single hand of bridge.

Oh, open or closed stock holdings? We split the difference. You leave your purchase face-up once around the table. When it's you again, you turn the stock face-down to show that you've started your new turn.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
16. Board Game: Boggle [Average Rating:6.19 Overall Rank:1959]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It says here that Boggle first came out in 1972. When we first got our hands on it around 1979, it was brand new as far as we knew.

In my life I have only lost one game of Boggle played face-to-face. It was the second game I'd ever played. I had an immediate affinity for the game and have gotten better with practice.

However, once the internet came along, I learned there were people who can beat me just as easily as I beat the rest of the world. As a Boggle player, I'm at about 99th percentile, but I'm nowhere near the best.

Incidentally, I still prefer the original edition with the slightly more challenging letter-cube set. To me it's an important part of the game to have some grids where there are only a very few words that can be made.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
17. Board Game: Paydirt [Average Rating:6.84 Overall Rank:2984]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Another 1972 release was the "bookshelf edition" game of Paydirt. I think it was about ten years later that I started playing it.

Based very realistically on the American sport of football, Paydirt uses charts depicting the actual performance of the NFL teams in a given season. Offensive and defensive plays are called simultaneously by the opposing players, and a roll of five special dice determines the outcome of the play based on those calls.

It really captures the ebb and flow of a real football game.

It has had imitators.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
18. Board Game: Hare & Tortoise [Average Rating:6.66 Overall Rank:1083]
Stven Carlberg
United States
Decatur
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Notice how all the games up to this point have one-word titles? That'll give you an inkling of how tradition tends to hold sway in game design.

But we reach a turning point with Hase und Igel, the game that in a certain sense inaugurates the modern era of gaming: that sense being, Hase und Igel was the first winner, in 1979, of the now coveted Spiel des Jahres award. (The game was first published in 1973, but at that point the SdJ panel took a few years in retrospect.)

It was a terrific choice for altering the course of game design history because Hase und Igel is such an unconventional game. The artistic design suggests to the unwary player that it's going to be a traditional roll-and-move exercise, but in fact it's a game where the player decides how far to move on each turn and pays a rapidly ascending price for the distance chosen.

Hase und Igel (or as the edition first imagined by British designer David Parlett was called, Hare and Tortoise) kicks the world of games into high gear. It's the first game on my list of chronological favorites that I actually bought after the German invasion of games. Our six-man game group needed six-player games!

There's lots more gamerly goodness to come in the next five lists.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.