A Thousand Logged Plays - My Lessons Learned
Tim Mierz
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Middletown
Connecticut
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After logging all my game plays for about fifteen months, I've gathered over one thousand plays, in over two hundred fifty distinct games! This doesn't count online plays without a board, nor does it count solo plays of anything.

Thanks to Friendless' great stats page (here's mine) I've been able to easily gather my top 10s in various fields: Straight-up Play Count, Approximate Hours Played, Number of Months Played, and two happiness metrics (Friendless, a mix of rating, hours, play count, and months played; and Huber, which is just rating and hours). Here are some thoughts and things learned from games that made these lists.
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1. Board Game: Galaxy Trucker [Average Rating:7.46 Overall Rank:127]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#6 in Play Count
#4 in Hours Played
#7 in Months Played
#4 in Friendless Happiness
#1 in Huber Happiness
#1 in Personal Top 10

My Rating: 10

Logged Play #1000!

Lesson Learned: Sometimes you just have to grin and bear it.

Plenty of games are mean to you. They'll make it tough to get money, they'll make it easy to get your troops killed. They'll throw Rats at you at the worst possible time. But Galaxy Trucker has a special sadism that not only destroys your belongings, but it takes that which you worked on, stressed over, and built with your very hands and crumbles it chunk by chunk by pummeling it with meteors, cannon fire, and the occasional sabotage. The cards have a special way of finding that one open connector and tossing a small meteor in there, destroying the unfortunate component that happened to be holding on three cannons on one side and your sole engine and 12 credits' worth of goods on the other. You learn from your mistakes, and this next time you'll make sure you don't have such vulnerable components like that. Then the Robosmokeys take out your battery component while Explosive Batteries is out, and you lose eight other central components, leaving you with a sorry third of a ship. As good as you can get at the game, there will always be that card specifically design to make your labor blow into bits right before your eyes.

And you know what? That's awesome.

Galaxy Trucker keeps bringing me back. Whether it's the challenge of building the perfect ship next time, or the joy of seeing tons of explosions, or the intense time pressure of the building phase, this game delivers. And if you're lucky, so do you.
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2. Board Game: Dominion [Average Rating:7.67 Overall Rank:72] [Average Rating:7.67 Unranked]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#2 in Play Count
#2 in Hours Played
#3 in Months Played
#2 in Friendless Happiness
#4 in Huber Happiness

My Rating: 8

Lesson Learned: You don't always need to take action.

Well... take actions, at least. As everyone who's come within 400 feet of this site knows, Dominion gains some replayability by randomizing the Action cards used each game. For that reason, it's enticing to take advantage of the new stuff all the time. I mean, there's a bunch of them, and they have all that artwork on them, they take up the most space, it seems to just make sense to load up on them.

But a lot can be gained from just taking the treasure cards, the ones that are always there, the ones that don't do anything particularly cool. Sure, some action support is useful, but depending on the other players, it can often be advantageous to focus on Gold collection, rather than playing through most of your deck and having 3 Coppers to show for it. You don't always have to focus on the new, the shiny, the enticing. Going with the old standbys can be just as rewarding, if not more.

As a game, Dominion gets an "okay, pretty good" rating from me, an 8. I like it, but don't love it. Cool filler, especially when played quickly, with some neat mechanics, but the amount of time I've spent it has mainly come from others' requests, especially after new cards have come into possession.
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3. Board Game: Malta! [Average Rating:4.93 Overall Rank:14871]
Tim Mierz
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Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#1 in Play Count
#5 in Hours Played
#1 in Months Played
#1 in Friendless Happiness
#8 in Huber Happiness

My Rating: 8

Lesson Learned: It's easier to spread happiness than you might think.

You probably don't know Malta! It's a game I made about five years ago, during an especially boring Discrete Math lecture in college. It's a pretty simple game - there's a board with numbers and arrow, you have a piece on the board, and a hand of Cards That Do Stuff, whether messing with the board, messing with people's hands, moving pieces around, or sometimes, if you want, sillier stuff like "Everyone Must Yell Malta!" No matter how you slice it, it's a pretty light game; some have compared it to Fluxx: The Board Game. (I personally think there's a lot more to it than that, but I'm a bit biased.)

The game mainly stayed within my own circle of friends and family, but late last year after discovering ArtsCow I was able to make up some nicer sets to give/sell to the people who I knew. I overestimated my audience, and out of the 30 decks I had printed, I had given fewer than 10 out. But the people with sets started going out and showing it to others, often people I never met. I started getting orders - "Five of my friends want a copy," "I want some sets to give out to students as gifts," "We have some new card ideas, can you make expansions?" I've since had to even make some new copies to distribute to people, after selling out of my initial supply. A lot of sets went out to people I've still never met. The kids in the picture above, I've never met in person. I know their father only from the internet, we were both active in the online community for another game, Redemption (see below a few entries), and he decided to get a copy for his family in California. I've even sent a copy to a game publisher, who is now planning on making it widely available some time next year. All this from some scribbles in Professor Statman's math lecture. Just taking a little initiative can end up spreading happiness to people across the country, and will continue to do so in even larger numbers and in even wider scope in the future.
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4. Board Game: Agricola [Average Rating:8.02 Overall Rank:17]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#2 in Hours Played
#4 in Months Played
#5 in Friendless Happinesss
#2 in Huber Happiness
#3 in Personal Top 10

My Rating: 9

Lesson Learned: Don't give up after just one try. Or two. Or three.

I first played Agricola just over a year ago, over my friend Tim F's house, using his pasted-up German copy. Our five-player game was long and demoralizing - I could never do anything I wanted, while everyone else seemed to be feasting and living large. Another play later that month wasn't much better. It just had no fun factor for me - I couldn't believe that the same guy that made great stuff like Bohnanza could've made something so... unfun.

It wasn't until November of last year that it was brought to the table again. While I still lost, I saw something new in it. Something just clicked. I saw the excitement in the challenge, the continual plan-altering after getting your actions taken, the struggle to get to do cool point-gaining stuff while, as others have so eloquently said, "put food on your family." I quickly requested the game again, and four days later I lost again. And then again. I played three times in February, something very rare in our group for a game that takes longer than 30 minutes. Many two-player games later, I still am not that great at it, but that's great, because I'm still relishing the challenge. I've still never won a game when playing against Luke or Tim, but that's all the more reason to keep with it, keep fighting starvation, and keep praying that I get dealt the Clay Worker.
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5. Board Game: Race for the Galaxy [Average Rating:7.77 Overall Rank:50]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#3 in Play Count
#1 in Hours Played
#7 in Months Played
#3 in Friendless Happiness
#3 in Huber Happiness

My Rating: 8

Lesson Learned: If you keep losing, it's probably not because of luck.

People love and hate Race for the Galaxy for the same reasons sometimes. Either the icons are terrible or they're fantastic. Either the game is too short to do anything interesting or it's short and sweet so you can play a lot. Either it's not interactive enough or the subtlety of interaction is its strength. I've gotten over most of these hurdles personally, but another one has remained with me: the luck factor.

In so many games, it seemed like everything just fell into place for the person who happened to win. They got dealt the perfect 6-cost dev. They achieved the goal a turn before I was planning on it and ended up winning because of it. My opponents played the two actions needed to fill up one of the tableaux and end it before I could get any real points. And so on, and so on. For a descendant of Puerto Rico, how could people love this level of luck?

I realized that it probably wasn't luck that was giving me my currently 13 out of 48 win rate; a lot of those games were 2-player games, so in theory I should be winning more than 1/4 of the time. Luke had 20 wins out of my plays, and he wasn't even involved in all of them, so he had probably over a 50% win rate. That's not luck. So I read more about it. I read through the "play by GeekList" games that were going on, seeing people's rationale and choices. I paid more attention to opponents' tableaux to see the effects of different action choices. I held onto big devs and molded my strategy around that. Sure, there is luck in the game - there is a deck of cards being dealt out, after all. But rather than saying the game was stupid and overly luck-based, I learned more and appreciated the game more.

I still stink at it though. I've lost my last six games, four of those being two-player. But its rating has gone from 6 to 8 for me after understanding the methods of using what you're dealt.
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6. Board Game: Nexus Ops [Average Rating:7.24 Overall Rank:336]
Tim Mierz
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Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#2 in Months Played
#6 in Friendless Happiness
#7 in Huber Happiness
#2 in Personal Top 10

My Rating: 10

Lesson Learned: Even failures can be great.

Nexus Ops packs in a great fun factor with pretty straightforward rules, high interactivity, and usually plenty of laughs. No two plays are identical, thanks to the randomness of the Secret Missions and Energize cards. The start of the game remains fairly constant, however - get some cheap units and uncover some exploration tiles for some more units and/or mines. Then as you start running into the opponents in a couple turns, you get it started in hah.

In one game with three new players, the first player spent all his starting rubium on a Lava Leaper. Lava Leapers are awesome to be sure, but it was a very unorthodox (stupid) move. Despite some warning that he would be unable to afford stuff and would likely die, he stayed with it and kept finding 2-mines he couldn't use. Eventually, before the game could end by someone getting 12 VPs, he was eliminated, stubbornly refusing to play normally. I ended up being the one to deliver the final blow, and also won the game.

This game, despite having what the kids call "fail," remains memorable. After posting a session report here, I got a fantastic response: the game in story form, as told by Nazhuret. I urge you to check it out (http://boardgamegeek.com/article/3015451#3015451) and make with the tips and thumbs to him if you're so inclined. That leads to another lesson - some BGG members are awesome.
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7. Board Game: Redemption [Average Rating:5.83 Overall Rank:10910]
Tim Mierz
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Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#4 in Play Count
#9 in Hours Played
#8 in Friendless Happiness
#9 in Huber Happiness

My Rating: 8

Lesson Learned: There are right and wrong ways to fix things.

I've played Redemption since about 1996, when I was a wee lad of 9 years. For years I played just against my dad, and eventually we discovered tournaments within driving distance. I stuck with the CCG for a very long time, and it kept improving... pretty much.

One of my favorite gameplay aspects of Redemption has been a very active battle phase. Each player's character has strength and toughness not unlike monsters in Magic, but during a battle (usually a one-on-one matchup) the losing side can play enhancement cards to either boost their numbers or have some other special effect. Then the new losing side can do the same, and it can keep going back and forth (or just staying on one side for a while if that side continues to be "losing"), until a victor finally emerges. It's a cool system, and allows for some nice epic battles, and also makes both the weak and strong valuable (initiative vs. raw power). It's a solid game, and its rating on this site is unfairly low.

After a couple sets, cards to be played outside of battle came along. These enhanced the game, stopping the most powerful cards from always being instant winners. But then those became dominant, so other non-battle cards came to keep those in check. And so on. And so on. As with any CCG, cards in new sets kept getting stronger, so that they weren't just printing worthless paper, but eventually enough cards were made that most of the battle phase could be largely eliminated. Most good decks made it so that the opponent couldn't participate in battle effectively, or sometimes at all.

Last August, I won the National Redemption Tournament with a deck based on discarding from the opponent's hand. It was not a popular deck style, but its effectiveness largely came from getting rid of the useful cards the opponent has - effectively stopping your opponent from having fun. There are plenty of other top decks whose focus is denying the opponent from being able to do things they want, from having a battle to having a hand to being able to draw. As these decks became more and more refined, the game started losing its fun - after all, that was the chief focus of most decks, to stop your opponent from having fun.

After moving away from any active Redemption playgroups, I participated in some online play, but it stopped being fun. The last game I played in person was over a year ago, at the national tournament. Since then, I've done less than a dozen (non-logged) online plays, and I don't have much desire to come back, even after another new set has been released. I haven't yet tried to unload my cards, in case I change my mind, and in case the game's direction does change. Still, I've had many good years with the game, and am very grateful for the game, the creator Rob Anderson, the online community which I still frequent, and all the playgroups I've been with over the years.
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8. Board Game: Heroscape Master Set: Rise of the Valkyrie [Average Rating:7.42 Overall Rank:269] [Average Rating:7.42 Unranked]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#8 in Hours Played
#6 in Huber Happiness
#4 in Personal Top 10

My Rating: 9

Lesson Learned: It's fine to keep some things as treats.

Since the late 90s, I've played (computer) games in the turn-based strategy series Heroes of Might and Magic. One of the best parts of the games is the battles, where each side has stacks of units gathered during the rest of the game, each with plenty of stats (movement, attack, defense, etc.) and special abilities. I shudder to think how many hours of my life have been spent playing Heroes 3, 4, and 5, but while playing it's some of the most fun I can have.

Then, a bit over a year ago, I learned of the battles of Heroes in board game form: HeroScape. It takes out some battle elements (like having an invincible "hero" casting spells and enhancing the troops) and adds others (elevation, line of sight, etc.), and simplifies the units' statistics enough that they're more easily calculable. I fell in love. While I don't own any HeroScape materials, my friends do, and once in a while as a special treat we'll pull out the huge plastic tubs of terrain and miniatures and have a dice-rolling good time. Not a brain burner but still full of tactical decisions. Not mathy but still takes some figuring out. Strikes a nice balance.

Due to portability and time issues, I haven't gotten to play it as much as I'd like, but I think that's fine. It makes the times where we do get to play it all the more special. I look forward to the planned HeroScape sessions more - even the fact that we have to plan sessions for the game makes it more "special" than most other games. Just like I save eating ice cream for just once in a while, I am fine with saving this treat and making the somewhat rarer plays all the better.
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9. Board Game: The Pillars of the Earth [Average Rating:7.31 Overall Rank:230]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#7 in Hours Played
#5 in Huber Happiness
#10 in Personal Top 10

My Rating: 9

Lesson Learned: Sometimes the obvious choices really are the way to go.

Pillars was the first worker placement game I ever learned, and I still enjoy it many plays later. Even though the variety of choices isn't that wide, I've found it replayable still - there's no perfect strategy I've seen employed or done myself. For those of you unfamiliar, one major way to get points is through Craftsmen, who generally turn some number of resources into points (usually 1, sometimes 2 and rarely more).

One space on the board is the Kingsbridge Priory, where instead of feeding into an engine by getting resources or resource converters or anything else, you just get 2 points (or 1 point if you're the second one on the space). I've found, to my surprise, that this is one of my favorite spaces to go to. It feels like this shouldn't be able to happen in a game like this, you shouldn't be able to get "easy" points like that to work better than a multistep process. It's too obvious, too direct, it must be better to build things up more subtly. But in my experience (granted, I'm no master, but I've won more than half of my games) it's a very solid choice in most cases. I'll fight for that space, paying plenty of gold to bring my master builder there so no one else can. As much as it feels like it "shouldn't" work, it constantly performs for me. I think it's not uncommon in life to double- and triple-think yourself into not choosing the "clear choice," the "obvious option," but sometimes it's a perfectly fine thing to do.

Also, I swear, those white master builders must be heavy because they always come last out of the bag.
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10. Board Game: Awesome Bots [Average Rating:7.53 Unranked]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#5 in Play Count
#7 in Friendless Happiness

My Rating: 8

Lesson Learned: There is nothing new under the sun.

Last November I invented a card game called Dash. Over the course of a couple phases you draft and then play a deck you make for yourself, trying for the most points. Most cards have a cost, and this cost is paid in previously-played cards. In the image to the left, the rightmost card gives you 30 diamond points, but to play it you have to trash at least 8 diamond points' worth of cards you've already played (discard them permanently). The leftmost card requires you to stash 3 diamond cards - you keep the points of stashed cards for end-game scoring, but you cannot use them to pay further costs. Player interaction is low. I made some copies through ArtsCow and have played a bit, it's a cool 20 minute filler.

After playing this game, I realized how much I ripped off from other games. The point shapes (hexagon, circle, diamond) probably came from having recently played Race for the Galaxy. The drafting element was in Dominion, Fairy Tale, and CCG booster drafts (although implemented a bit differently). The "stash or trash" aspect isn't too far divorced from the main ways of playing cards in .hack//ENEMY (sacrifice or spot). I didn't realize it when designing it, but all I had done was take other games I'd played in recent weeks and combine them into something new. I was a little upset when I realized this, although how original can games really be anymore?
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11. Board Game: Bohnanza [Average Rating:7.06 Overall Rank:371]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#4 in Months Played
#9 in Friendless Happiness

My Rating: 8

Lesson Learned: House ruling is fine... to a point.

Because I didn't start logging my plays till the last week of college, a lot of plays have not been recorded. The one to miss out the most besides Redemption could very well be Bohnanza. During the last two years of college, my friend Mars requested playing this a lot. A lot. We could've well averaged a play a day some months. While we convinced her to play a lot of Inklings, Catch Phrase, and Vegas Showdown too, Bohnanza was number one in her heart. Luckily, the rest of us liked it too.

Eventually, she acquired her own copy and introduced it to her family. They were enamored with it and requested playing it constantly. And it frustrated her to no end. When I first heard that, I figured she just overplayed it and it wasn't fun anymore. I thought that her parents had done to her what she had done to us and nearly run the game into the ground. But that wasn't quite the case. You see, she didn't have a gaming family. But the negotiation in this must've just clicked something inside them. But they didn't just trade their beans normally. It started with the "okay, but you owe me" trades that we all make and never expect repayment for what's owed. Fine. Then they got out poker chips to mark the donations and "owed" cards. A Stink Bean for free? Sure, just take this chip. Then they started trading the chips. An IOU for a Wax Bean five turns ago became trading material. Add in what was explained to me as a complete lack of understanding about the values of beans, along with some other rules I don't even remember, and Mars just couldn't handle it. This wasn't even Bohnanza they were playing anymore, but some kind of strange, distantly related trading game that used some of the same components as Bohnanza.

For the rest of us, who didn't have to deal with Mars' family, this meant more Bohnanza requests from her, so that she could get in some plays the right way after her family's "variant."

My family is shown in the picture to the left. I'm in the back deep in thought concerning her fields. My dad is depressedly about to donate a field. My cousin in white is immensely proud of his fields. My sister in black doesn't seem to care much about the game, but she probably won anyways.
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12. Board Game: Betrayal at House on the Hill [Average Rating:7.10 Overall Rank:423]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#7 in Months Played
#10 in Friendless Happiness

My Rating: 8

Lesson Learned: There can be less than meets the eye.

I played this a few times at a game store's game day, and I absolutely loved it, but by that point it was nearly impossible to find for under $100. I ended up stumbling upon it at a different game store while visiting my family in Connecticut, and I got to bring it out a bunch. "Mansion Creepy Game" became my number one favorite game, playing it whenever I could muster up any group at all. Sure, it had its flaws, like the possibility of a turn 1 haunt and such, but it was just SO FUN to play with my friends.

The seemingly endless variety of haunts was huge for replayability, and some of the cards' text was hilarious (like the Jonah's Turn event). As I kept playing, though, I started to realize that even though we were getting different haunt scenarios, they shared a whole lot in common. Find rooms X, Y, or Z, and pass skill checks I, J, and K. Run away from Big Bad Monster unless you're the strongest guy. Et cetera. I was blind to it before, because of the coolness factor, but the more I played the less I realized I was actually doing. Where I had seen strategic maneuvers, I now just see either obvious choices or no choice at all. It has since become less of a "game" in my eyes.

Still, it's a fun experience, so it keeps its 8 rating from me.
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13. Board Game: Battlestar Galactica: The Board Game [Average Rating:7.75 Overall Rank:62]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#9 in Hours Played
#9 in Huber Happiness

My Rating: 8

Lesson Learned: Theme trumps big rulebooks.

My parents have been good with tolerating and even encouraging my gaming. My dad played Redemption with me for years and years. My mom decorated my bedroom to be Monopoly themed, including a huge rendition of the Jail corner of the board on one wall. They took me to tag sale for old games and would play them with me. They even did the research on this site and got me Puerto Rico for Christmas a few years ago, seeing it was number one. After seeing they enjoyed playing Puerto Rico, Yspahan, Bohnanza, and Malta!, I decided to get them a non-party game they could enjoy. Since they're both Battlestar Galactica fanatics, and the game was so well-received, I got it for them last Christmas.

What I didn't realize until they opened the gift was the 32-page rulebook. I learned and taught the game, hoping beyond hope that the large number of rules wouldn't deter them from enjoying the game. If it had been themed with generic fantasy or generic space or generic farming, there's no way they could've followed the amount of stuff they'd have to remember. But as I explained, I got things like, "Oh, that makes sense, because that's how it is in the show." Their memory of the rules wasn't perfect (I managed to keep everything in check for the most part), but their enjoyment and understanding of the theme kept them active and interested.

They've since gone on to play with their BSG-watching friends, as well as some webcam-based plays with me. They involve a lot of notetaking and BGG file searching (thanks file uploaders!) on my part but it works. I'm glad I was able to find something that keeps my parents enjoying games like this, even with the 32-page rulebooks. In the several games we've played, my dad has been a Cylon every single time, and my mom has never been one. Suspicious. Also, it's hard to teach a game when you're a traitor and you have to balance making helpful suggestions with making "helpful" suggestions.
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14. Board Game: Starfarers of Catan [Average Rating:6.81 Overall Rank:850]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Accomplishments:
#9 in Hours Played
#9 in Huber Happiness

My Rating: 8

Lesson Learned: Sometimes if people don't want you to succeed, there's nothing you can do.

The most recent game of Starfarers I played was a teaching game, with three new players and myself. They caught on just fine, although I did maintain a lead. After acquiring some friendship tokens and other points, I was within a point of winning. This did not escape the attention of my opponents. Instantly, no one would even think about trading with me for any reason. I became robbed of my friendship chips and the resulting points. Occasionally one of them would think for a split second of doing a trade, but they were swiftly reminded by everyone else that I was close to winning, and so I couldn't afford a colony ship to land and give me a point, ultimately giving the victory to one of my opponents.

At that point the situation was beyond my control. No silver-tongued negotiation was going to get me any resources, no fancy rolling could ensure an encounter for the chance at a fame ring, no pleading would stop them from stealing my chips. Was there anything I could've done? Probably not, at that point. Maybe I'm just a quitter, but I think these situations where there are no effective actions come up in life, and you just have to accept your lot.

The picture to the left is not from the described game, but from a different one I was involved in. This game ended at around 3 AM, as you might be able to tell from our tired faces. Ian (center) didn't let the lateness stop him from thinking over and over about the perfect plan for the game. His idea - a pretty cool-sounding one - was to get a trade ship at the beginning to send to the Travelers at the other end of the board, and get an Encounter every turn from the friendship card there. Stock up on carbon and fill up with cannons, and get plenty of fame rings from encounters while messing up others'. Haven't gotten to try that yet, but it's at least intriguing.
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15. Board Game: Bali [Average Rating:6.35 Overall Rank:6162]
 
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Games Only in the Play Count list:

#7 (tie): Metropolys
#7 (tie): Unpublished Prototype
#9: Bali
#10: Wits & Wagers

So these are games that are too quick and haven't been played for many different months. In here we have a great light/"gateway" game, a great word game, and a great party/trivia game.
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16. Board Game: Prophecy [Average Rating:6.69 Overall Rank:1440]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Game Only on Hours Played List:

#5: Prophecy

It takes a three-hour game to be played only 7 times out of 1000 logged plays and have it take the #5 spot on the time spent list. Granted, all but one of my plays have been under 2 hours, but I am not to argue against the BGG "playing time" field.
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17. Board Game: Carcassonne: The City [Average Rating:7.21 Overall Rank:509]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Games Only in the Months Played List:

#2: Carcassonne: The City
#7 (tie): Thurn and Taxis
#7 (tie): Yspahan

These are games that have pretty spread-out plays, but that means I'm coming back to them at least.
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18. Board Game: Inklings [Average Rating:6.39 Overall Rank:6443]
Tim Mierz
United States
Middletown
Connecticut
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Five of the games on my personal Top 10 didn't make it to any other list:

#5: Space Alert
#6: Through the Ages: A Story of Civilization
#7: Puerto Rico
#8: Neuroshima Hex!
#9: Inklings

I have to make more of an effort to get these played, although they all have qualities that make them tough games to play often (coop, long, exhausted, two-player, word). But at least half of my Top 10 got played enough to merit being on other lists.
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