Imagining the Game: Past, Present and Future
Chuck Uherske
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This unconventional, idiosyncratic list is dedicated to the proposition that the unexamined life is not worth living, and the unexamined game is not worth playing.

There are people who live in the moment. I am not among them. From as far back as I can remember, I have been as interested in my past and my future as much as my present.

Whenever I've taken a journey, whether an early-childhood trip to Disneyland, or last year's solo pilgrimage to Mongolia, I've experienced it multiple times: in the anticipation, in the actual experience, and in the recollection. I will huddle with the Lonely Planet guide for weeks in advance, assembling imagined images of what I'm about to see. When finally there, I'll watch in fascination as actual reality gradually displaces what I'd had anticipated (never completely; I've noticed that a bit of the latter forever co-exists with the former.) And then afterwards I'll relive the memories over and over. It's pretty good for the travel budget: I get dozens of journeys for the price of one.

This doesn't, however, apply solely to travel; it's embedded in my psyche. Not only do I have absurdly vivid recollections not only of my old elementary school days, I actually have vivid recollections of my anticipation of those events. I can still remember, for example, the morning of my first day of kindergarten, watching my mother make the bed before we shuttled off, and imagining what it was going to be like inside that big red brick building.

There is thus always a part of me that is stepping back from every scene, not fully participating in the moment, maybe imagining how it will look from the perspective of the future, or anticipating some future event.

I used to worry about this aspect of myself (we are, after all, bombarded with constant admonitions to live in the moment and to "let go," as it were.) I was greatly relieved when I stumbled across Marcel Proust's writing, and he effectively told me that I was, if not typical, certainly not alone in this condition.

So what the hell does this all have to do with playing games? My thesis here is that game-playing is a similar sort of manipulation of mental space, and thus it attracts people who are more likely to exhibit a version of these tendencies: people who think about what they're experiencing instead of simply experiencing it.

I hardly ever play games purely in the moment. As the game develops, as tactics are tried, and then succeed or fail, I start chronicling, critiquing silently. The post-mortem is, to me, as much fun as the game. I'm always eager to chat or swap e-mails afterward, discussing what happened, and why. And though no one in our group suffers from this quite as much as I do, everyone does it to some extent.

So what's this list all about? It's about games as experienced in the Past, in the Present, and in the Future. How do we remember the games that we play? Do we think about anything new as we play them, or do we simply execute previously-conceived movements? And how do we anticipate games not yet played?

Feel free to add to this list, though frankly -- it's so odd, I haven't a clue what it might inspire you to add.
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1. Board Game: The Princes of Florence [Average Rating:7.57 Overall Rank:116]
Chuck Uherske
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The Past, I: Princes of Florence is a game that is almost entirely about its own past. A newcomer to a game cannot possibly know what to do, what is the relative value of a jester versus a recruiting card.

Within the current game, the margin of error is so slight that not all of the game is really played within the present. You have a limited number of moves in which you can get out of the situation in which you find yourself. That die is cast before you fully realize it.

Your fate in this game will depend on how you handle your own past: what you realize when you look back on previous games. You constantly modify your evaluations of the game's various elements, refining on each occasion that adds to your catalogue of past experiences.

Consequently, each player in a PofF game is usually remembering previous games even as they play. Thinking: "There was that game at WBC where that woman smoked me after getting two jesters in the first two rounds. She wasn't half-bad-looking, in a librarian-ish sort of way. . ."
 
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2. Board Game: I'm the Boss! [Average Rating:6.82 Overall Rank:933]
Chuck Uherske
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The Past, II: For many people, I'm the Boss must be a game played in the present. It's dominated by the unpredictable chaos that ensues from players disrupting one another's actions, hurling cards at the playing surface.

Which is precisely why I can't play I'm the Boss entirely in the present. I'm disoriented by everything going on during the game, and all I can is try to survive based on what I feel I learned after judging my performance last time around. It's only in between games that I can decide to modify when I draw cards, when I open negotiations, when I offer an investor, and when I disrupt. To the extent I try to invent this all anew during a game, I'm doomed.

I'm the Boss is also a game about fellowship. It's perfect for playing with friends who know each other well, and thus is a good game to remember to picture old scenes around the game table.
 
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3. Board Game: Evo [Average Rating:6.88 Overall Rank:756]
Chuck Uherske
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The Past, III: Evo, too, is a game that is seemingly about the present. Dinosaurs evolve and move towards each other on a small island. Soon there are more dinos than can thrive in the habitable land, and they have to prevail in competition to survive. It's all about watching your back, and seeing when the other guy has left his unguarded.

But for me, what transpires in Evo is almost entirely a product of who has acquired what powers, and this in turn requires one to remember what happened last time around. It ought to be more obvious, mathematically, what is a valuable power, and what isn't, in Evo. But for some reason, it has eluded me so far. So in Evo I find myself always thinking back on past games, and struggling to learn lessons from them.
 
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4. Board Game: El Grande [Average Rating:7.79 Overall Rank:54]
Chuck Uherske
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The Past, IV: El Grande is positively made for post-mortems. Though the basic options available to each player are fairly straightforward, their application can take so many various forms that only a much smarter person than I can really plan out his game during play. Immediately upon the game's conclusion, everyone revisits the events, and shares their often-very-divergent views of what took place and what could have taken place.

El Grande leaves me forever looking back at the last game, and what I learned from it. It's Ben making better use of the Castillo than I; it's failing to have realized the power of a special scoring card. A game for regrets and the self-corrections they inspire.
 
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5. Board Game: Santiago [Average Rating:7.13 Overall Rank:523]
Chuck Uherske
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Rockville
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The Past, V: I suspect I may be unusual in thinking about Santiago in terms of Its Past. Someone who is better attuned to the dynamics between players can perceive, during the game, the consequences of a particular bribe or a tile placement.

But not me. Each set of opportunities may have a particular Potential Value, but only with experience do I learn how that Potential Value relates to the actual value as it unfolds empirically during the game. I am constantly looking back at past games and noticing that I was systematically bidding too low, or more recently, bidding too high when overlooking a certain tactical reality. Perhaps if I played this game more in the moment, I would do better at it, but I am forever looking backwards at previous games and trying to correct past errors.

Santiago, too, has a certain aesthetic purity to it that resurrects the sublime feel of a good game day: just the right mix of streamlined rules, player interaction, and mutually deceptive silence. It's a call to the pleasant past amid the stresses of the present.
 
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6. Board Game: Chess [Average Rating:7.09 Overall Rank:415] [Average Rating:7.09 Unranked]
Chuck Uherske
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The Present, I: Perhaps no game more than chess has facilitated my stepping back during the game and thinking, "What is it I am trying to accomplish?" You play tactically within the moment, but if you are like me, you also are constantly consulting an inner encyclopedia of chess openings, strategic principles, and endgame lessons. Chess is, no doubt, a game about its past as well, but I can think of few gaming experiences that seem to offer as much inner consultation of factors transcending the game of the moment, in the moment.

When I used to play chess competitively, the intense "in the moment" experience used to extend to the tournament room itself: I was very alive to what was happening around the room -- what upset was taking place three boards down, the books for sale at a nearby table, and so forth. Little of this used to destructively distract me when I was "in the zone."
 
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7. Board Game: Scotland Yard [Average Rating:6.51 Overall Rank:1061]
Chuck Uherske
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Rockville
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The Present, II: I don't spend much time thinking about Scotland Yard strategy between games. Beyond recalling its alluring map of London, I don't tend to look back on previous games with detailed nostalgia about how they unfolded.

Instead, for me, Scotland Yard is a game that unfolds almost entirely in its Present. If you're Mr. X (one of gaming's great experiences) you watch your opponents collaborate and you silently calculate, based on that, what you yourself will do. Few gaming experiences are more fun than taking a small risk of being nabbed in order to slip through the cordon and sail quickly across the board, far from your pursuers.

On the other side, too, it's all about the moment. The team of detectives doesn't spend time worrying about past games; they must look at the realities of the board and figure out, anew, how best to hem in the fugitive. This requires total cooperation in the moment in order to work.
 
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8. Board Game: Pacal [Average Rating:6.22 Overall Rank:7939]
Chuck Uherske
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Rockville
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The Present, III: Pacal is a rarity among my game collection. It somehow escapes my obsessive tendency to mull over strategic changes between games. The game seems too simple for that, as though time thus spent could not possibly be worth the investment. Instead, I find myself, during Pacal games, not only calculating the best tactical moves, but also revisiting the larger strategy of the game, in mid-game. I may do a little of this in other games, but in no game other than Pacal do I feel so comfortable taking apart and reassembling my entire strategic conception of the game as it is taking place.
 
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9. Board Game: Empire Builder [Average Rating:6.93 Overall Rank:951]
Chuck Uherske
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Rockville
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The Present, IV: Empire Builder has a strong "past" element for me, in remembering previous games in which I'd screwed up, as well as long-ago games of EB that enlivened my teenage years. But it is a game, for me, that is very much experienced in the Present. Part of this is the length and deliberate speed of the game. Chances are that during your opponent's move, you will have time to ponder not only your next set of tactical moves but to constantly modify your larger strategy. You may find yourself staring at the board, getting outside of the immediate tactical situation, and visualizing a larger plan for the optimal rail network.

Then, too, the game is made for long, lazy sessions with two players who don't have to work the next morning. Its about the aroma of coffee and the grit of Chex Mix on your fingers. All of this adds to the immediacy of the gaming experience.
 
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10. Board Game: Acquire [Average Rating:7.36 Overall Rank:207]
Chuck Uherske
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Rockville
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The Present, V: Acquire is one of the games I've played where I felt most strongly a sense of self-actualization: as if my whole world had come together in a perfect bubble of contentment, and I didn't want to be anywhere other than where I currently was.

There have been occasional moments in Acquire when I have looked around the table and felt total zen-like serenity; no desire, no frustration, no ambition, nothing other than me and the board and my friends and the mergers around the corner.

I suspect that this is due in part to the fact that Acquire is so familiar, and there isn't that much heavy strategy to review between games, once you've played a few dozen times. This frees you to delve into every Acquire game without conscious focus on the last one or the next one.
 
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11. Board Game: Wallenstein (first edition) [Average Rating:7.51 Overall Rank:342]
Chuck Uherske
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Rockville
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The Future, I: Now we come to the games of the future, games as I only imagine them to be.

Wallenstein inhabits a unique location in my imaginary gaming world. It is described as part German game, part wargame -- a description that virtually ensures that it will be intensely imagined. It is all too easy for the mind to summon up images of extended hours of wargaming in youth, maybe a dash of the slowly unfolding pleasures of Civilization, minus the enervation of too long at the gaming table, and there substituted the more intense engagement and involvement that have flowed from more recent German game experiences.

I imagine the map for this game laid out on the table, the dice tower poised by the side of the board, some players sitting, others walking around the table, studying it like the map in Churchill's Underground War room, on their way to retrieving their next glass of soda. I may never play this game, but it has been the subject of ample involuntary anticipation.
 
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12. Board Game: Dschunke [Average Rating:6.69 Overall Rank:1825]
Chuck Uherske
United States
Rockville
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The Future, II: I tend to discount atmosphere in game-playing, a tendency I should shift a bit now that I am clearly so affected by the smooth melding of theme and mechanic that makes Traumfabrik so enjoyable.

Dschunke is a game that haunts my imagination. Southeast Asia is one of my three favorite places in the world (the other two being Venice and the Utah canyon country), and a game that depicts the languid, indolent atmosphere of wooden boats bobbing in the floating markets is too much for me to resist. The game doesn't receive uniformly good reviews, but it reportedly has a fairly spare design that admits of my anticipating the sensation of a certain Zen-like serenity.
 
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13. Board Game: Die Macher [Average Rating:7.65 Overall Rank:186]
Chuck Uherske
United States
Rockville
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The Future, III: This game has an exalted reputation, and is of an age that might suit those of us who fell in love with gaming before the recent German design revolution. It is easy to imagine it being an engrossing, obsessing way to spend an afternoon -- or two -- or dozens.

I had a few politically themed games as a kid, and though none of them were great, there was something about the strategy of brokering coalitions and controlling regions that appeals to the strategist in me (however distasteful I find the actual practice in life.) This game thus occupies a firm place in my imagination, a game I may never play but have often imagined myself playing.
 
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14. Board Game: MarraCash [Average Rating:6.83 Overall Rank:1719]
Chuck Uherske
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Rockville
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The Future, IV: We go from the more distant anticipation to the more immediate. I don't spend that much time thinking about Die Macher, as it's unlikely I will actually own or pay it. But Marracash has worked its way into the zone where anticipation becomes more intense for being likely to be realized. I read the reviews of Thi and Michael and others that describe this as exactly the sort of minimalist elegance that so appeals to me.

Marracash may or may not be all that, but it's on my near-term wish list now, and I do find myself checking out the rules now and then and imagining how a game unfolds. I don't have Sid Sackson's reputed ability to predict how a game plays out simply by reading the rules; but Marracash's descriptions would call that ability into operation if I did possess it.
 
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15. Board Game: Taj Mahal [Average Rating:7.32 Overall Rank:306]
Chuck Uherske
United States
Rockville
Maryland
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The Future, V: With a dash of the past. I can't believe that when this game was first released, I walked so many times past it in the game store without picking it up.

Now I think of Taj Mahal primarily in terms of the imaginary future: descriptions by Thi, Gola and Fawkes create an image of an intense, sublime experience filled with calcuation and bluff and mystery and frustration. Yet the game never comes into clear focus; it's not like Marracash in that I have a clear sense as to the actual play, but rather more like my images of Die Macher, a vague sense of its aesthetic feel.
 
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16. Board Game: Goa [Average Rating:7.62 Overall Rank:107]
Damian Evans
United States
Spokane
Washington
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Recent Past & Present-
It looks to dry for my wife. It is highly regarded by my geek buddies. It may be great and wouldn't see the light of day.(The Worst)

It had been "on the bubble" for about a month when I found that Duane, from our gaming group, had it. He sent us home with it. Yay!!! Fresh Meat!! I read the rules as soon as it was home. (Can be almost as fun as playing games) It looked very interesting.

Played the game.....
..........
...

My wife thought it was dry.
It felt that way to me too. I dismissed the game without immediatly. [I don't have the vision you do, Chuck. I'm more of a hindsight 20/20(past) and a cause & effect(present) kind of guy.]

What I didn't realise was that the game was already in my head.
hmm... If I never take taxes? I have more actions.
hmm... What if I concentrate on different spice to start?
hmm... How should I appoach the auction?

16 hours later...

"Honey.... Would you mind playing Goa again?"

Though, in the end, the theme does feel slapped on and is a little to dry for my wife. There seems to be alot of game here. I am looking forward to more plays for sure.
We know someone with a copy.
So we don't need a copy.
Do we?...

Maybe I should have put this game in the "Game... GET OUT OF MY HEAD!!!" list.


 
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