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Subject: A Socially Inept Review of Bruges rss

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Tiffany Bahnsen
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Elements:

2-4 Players
60 Minutes
City Building Theme
Hand Management
Designer: Stephan Feld
Artist: Michael Menzel
Publisher: Z-Man Games


Overview:

Bruges has the type of play I have come to expect from a Stephan Feld game, that is to say there are many ways to earn points! Most points in this game are earned through the clever card play. To start a round, each player draws from two piles to build a hand of five cards. Four of those cards will be played in the course of the round. Each card can be used to do one of six actions: take two workers of that color, take money, eliminate one threat of the same color, build a canal section on a space of the same color, build a house, or recruit a person.

Once a person is recruited into a house, not only are they worth points, but they also have special abilities. These abilities are either activated immediately, activated with a worker, remain in effect throughout the game, or activate during end-game scoring. Abilities are as diverse as they are awesome (making the decision to recruit or use another action particularly agonizing). Beyond recruiting people, even MORE points can be earned by building houses, completing 3 canal segments, eliminating threats, moving up on the reputation track, finishing canals, or having the majority of people, canal segments, or reputation at the end of a round.


Thoughts:

Oh the beloved hotness! I have been stalking Bruges for months, so when I heard there were going to be copies available at Origins 2013 I was delighted. Bruges sold out super fast, but does it live up to the hype? After five plays, I will say that it didn't disappoint. Here's the good stuff:

Bruges makes for a great introduction to Feld. There are fewer moving parts than his other games AND it's more tactical than you might expect. The dice rolling, coupled with an unpredictable hand of cards each round, make it harder to plan out a long term strategy. This lowers the barrier to entry for new players and forces experienced players adapt to the ever-changing situations. Be forewarned though, gamers who are expecting engine building may become frustrated!

The mechanisms are efficienct! I'm a big fan of the Glory to Rome-esque multi-use cards. Since the cards represent every action a player can take, and all of the people, AND all of the houses, the game doesn't get overly busy on the table. The dice are much the same way. You roll them at the beginning of a round and they set the amount of money you can collect, the number and type of threats a player receives, and the cost and availability of moving up on the reputation track.

Threat markers add a good deal of tension to every decision you have to make. Once you get three of the same color a disastrous tragedy (plague, fire, flood, uprising, and intrigue?) befalls you. Here is a conversation I had with myself every time I played:

Should I pay three guilders to move up the reputation track? It's expensive, but what if everybody else moves up and I get left behind? I'll be giving up my shot at the majority and missing out on one point! BUT if I spend my guilders on this guy in my hand it will get me a five points later on. OR maybe I should use this guy to mitigate this threat of floor. I'll still get a point AND I won't lose all of my workers next round. "Oh, hey guys, is it my turn?"

Would it be a Feld of there weren't multiple paths to victory? There are many ways to optimize whatever situation you find yourself in during this game. In our first four player game, we had someone build as many houses as possible, someone who tried to recruit the widest variety of people, someone who attacked the other players using cards that give out threat tokens, and I went canal heavy. It might might feel like too many options if your group is not used to this style of game, but it's easy enough to figure out after a round or so.

Bruges seems to scale very well. I have played with every possible player count (plus a solo learning game) and the experience has felt exactly the same. In set up, the gigantic deck of cards is divided into five equal piles and only a number of those piles equal to the number of players is used for the game. This ensures game won't drag on forever or end abruptly, no matter who you have to play with.

Rating:

Components ■ ■ ■
Artwork ■ ■ ■
Theme ■ □ □


Bruges is a good-looking looking game, full of high quality components. The board is especially gorgeous and small enough leave room for the many cards in your tableau. The cards each have beautifully illustrated portraits and each one is completely unique! There is clear iconography indicating the six actions that are available each turn on each card.
I'll admit that I didn't have high expectations for the theme of Bruges, but it is a (teensy, tiny) bit more thematic than other Feld games I've played. Some of the mechanisms fit. Using workers to build houses makes sense. Needing empty houses to recruit people makes sense. Rolling dice to determine threats makes...wait, I thought the dice are supposed to represent a stock market of sorts, not sure how that works! Strong theme is not a dealbreaker for me, but this is definitely not the game for someone looking to immerse themselves in 15th century Belgian politics!

Rules ■ ■ ■
Ease of Play ■ ■ □
Teachability ■ ■ ■


This was definitely the fastest I have ever gotten though a Stephan Feld rule book! It is clearly written and made sense on the first read. I barely had to reference the rules during game play, but the layout made it convenient when I did. The game was very easy to explain and my group picked up on it quickly. I did play with one player that was a little overwhelmed with the variety of actions at first, but the reference cards helped to clarify things for him. Bottom-line, felt great to get a fairly complex game taught in less than five minutes and played in just over one hour. The game play flows so nicely, I hardly noticed the clock at all!

Balance ■ ■ □
Enjoyment ■ ■ ■
Replayability ■ ■ ■


Scores have been close in all of my plays, so the game seems balanced. The only concern I have is with the Engraver. In end-game scoring he gives two victory points for each different group in your city, and with eleven different groups it could mean a ton of victory points! The person that played this card has won in two of my five plays. That being said, there is only one Engraver in the deck of 165 cards and he can be cost prohibative. I will say he is strong, but not necessarily overpowered. Only future plays will tell for sure, and I certainly plan to be playing this game a few million more times!

There may not be anything super unique about the gameplay of Bruges, but it combines some familiar elements extremely well! The reputation track and canals are reminiscent of the council chamber and traveling from Village. The threat mechanism works similarly to the event cards in Troyes. If you couple that with the relatively fast rounds and shorter play time, it might make it to the table more often than those games. Bruges a medium-heavy weight game. Strategic decisions don't come easy, but it's still not what I would consider brain burning. It is also one of the few Euro games that I could tolerate playing more than once in a night, so that puts in into a category all it's own.

Overall, Bruges scores a 8.5/10 for me.

I like it, I'd suggest it, and I'd never turn down a game.


Submitted by The Socially Inept Gamer, Tiffany
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Chris Copac
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Great review!
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David B
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Excellent review. I would love to hear your opinion of how this compares to Rialto if you ever get a chance to play it.
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E Thomas
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Thanks for the great review. One question:

Can you comment on the card stock? Does it have a linen finish, a la Race for the Galaxy, Fleet, Glory To Rome (black box), etc., or are the cards smooth?

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wavedog98 wrote:
Thanks for the great review. One question:

Can you comment on the card stock? Does it have a linen finish, a la Race for the Galaxy, Fleet, Glory To Rome (black box), etc., or are the cards smooth?


Im not one to give a definitive answer, but all games Ive ever seen by HiG have linen finish.
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Mathue Faulkner
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wavedog98 wrote:
Thanks for the great review. One question:

Can you comment on the card stock? Does it have a linen finish, a la Race for the Galaxy, Fleet, Glory To Rome (black box), etc., or are the cards smooth?

Linen finish.
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pfctsqr wrote:
Excellent review. I would love to hear your opinion of how this compares to Rialto if you ever get a chance to play it.
I've played both, and I prefer Bruges. Rialto is a good game, and I look forward to finally getting my copy. Bruges is just an outstanding game.

To compare, I'd say Bruges is more tactical with interesting card interactions. Rialto seems more strategic in that you can somewhat decide what path(s) to take. Getting the right cards in Rialto is important, so start player is crucial. In Bruges, the card distribution is almost irrelevant to start player.

They have a totally different feel when playing, so you could own both.
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jkayati wrote:
Getting the right cards in Rialto is important, ...
Unfortunately the same is true with Bruges. And while in Rialto you can choose most of the cards you will get, in Bruges you can't.

So you may end up with mediocre cards while your opponent gets the right cards to build a nice compo.

The large amount of luck in card drawing - without options to mitigate it, ruined Bruges for me.
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Alexander Simbürger
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GeoMan wrote:
jkayati wrote:
Getting the right cards in Rialto is important, ...
Unfortunately the same is true with Bruges. And while in Rialto you can choose most of the cards you will get, in Bruges you can't.

So you may end up with mediocre cards while your opponent gets the right cards to build a nice compo.

The large amount of luck in card drawing - without options to mitigate it, ruined Bruges for me.
While I agree that it can be depressing sometimes, when your opponents get all their nice little combos /scoring engines going, while you are still struggling with your cards, it doesn't seem to happen too often. The times when it happened so far in the games i played, people where most ofthen just going: "Ok, this round was really bad for me, let's play another round!"

I would even see it as a positive aspect of the game, as due to the easy to learn rules and the randomness of the draws, it almost classifies as gateway game (where a new player could also beat an experienced player with the right cards, not getting totally stomped by the more experienced player...).

So far I played the game with my wife, some gamer friends as well as some non-gamers (e.g. my parents) and everyone of them really liked the game.

I just see the game as a "Let's see what the game gives me and make the most out of it" - type of game, which i personally really like. But it may not be the right game for the strategic player, as it is almost completely tactical only.

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Fernando Robert Yu
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jkayati wrote:
pfctsqr wrote:
Excellent review. I would love to hear your opinion of how this compares to Rialto if you ever get a chance to play it.
I've played both, and I prefer Bruges. Rialto is a good game, and I look forward to finally getting my copy. Bruges is just an outstanding game.

To compare, I'd say Bruges is more tactical with interesting card interactions. Rialto seems more strategic in that you can somewhat decide what path(s) to take. Getting the right cards in Rialto is important, so start player is crucial. In Bruges, the card distribution is almost irrelevant to start player.

They have a totally different feel when playing, so you could own both.
That's the plan! I hope the English version of Bruges is available this September so I can (hopefully) order it from Boardgamesguru when I visit England that month!
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GeoMan wrote:
jkayati wrote:
Getting the right cards in Rialto is important, ...
Unfortunately the same is true with Bruges. And while in Rialto you can choose most of the cards you will get, in Bruges you can't.

So you may end up with mediocre cards while your opponent gets the right cards to build a nice compo.

The large amount of luck in card drawing - without options to mitigate it, ruined Bruges for me.
I really don't see the card draw as being that limiting in Bruges. You can always do something, and it's very rare you end up with such bad cards that your game is foiled.

In Rialto, your choice is severely limited by turn order, and the cards you get aren't always useful. In Bruges, I can almost always find uses for the cards. I just might have to change the direction I was building on.
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The more I read about this game, the more I get the impression that this is a similar game in feel to Macao but easier. Is this an accurate impression? For those that think the game is too random or luck based, do you find Macao more or less so? Is the need for flexible thinking in regards to the cards(as in which direction you should go at any given moment) similar to Macao? Is there more or less of a need to hold plans loosely compared to Macao? Is this game different enough to be enjoyed alongside Macao?

 
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jkayati wrote:
GeoMan wrote:
jkayati wrote:
Getting the right cards in Rialto is important, ...
Unfortunately the same is true with Bruges. And while in Rialto you can choose most of the cards you will get, in Bruges you can't.

So you may end up with mediocre cards while your opponent gets the right cards to build a nice compo.

The large amount of luck in card drawing - without options to mitigate it, ruined Bruges for me.
I really don't see the card draw as being that limiting in Bruges. You can always do something, and it's very rare you end up with such bad cards that your game is foiled.

In Rialto, your choice is severely limited by turn order, and the cards you get aren't always useful. In Bruges, I can almost always find uses for the cards. I just might have to change the direction I was building on.
I have to agree with you. Worst case, you can always use a card to get money and I've never been in a situation personally where I didn't need more money than I had. And the two separate draw decks at least give you some minor control over what color cards you end up drawing. It's not much, but it's better than nothing.
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CarlG wrote:
The more I read about this game, the more I get the impression that this is a similar game in feel to Macao but easier. Is this an accurate impression? For those that think the game is too random or luck based, do you find Macao more or less so? Is the need for flexible thinking in regards to the cards(as in which direction you should go at any given moment) similar to Macao? Is there more or less of a need to hold plans loosely compared to Macao? Is this game different enough to be enjoyed alongside Macao?

It doesn't really feel like Macao to me. I think Macao is significantly better (and I think CoB is much better than Macao). This is a Feldy card game, while Macao and CoB are board games.
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jkayati wrote:
GeoMan wrote:
jkayati wrote:
Getting the right cards in Rialto is important, ...
Unfortunately the same is true with Bruges. And while in Rialto you can choose most of the cards you will get, in Bruges you can't.

So you may end up with mediocre cards while your opponent gets the right cards to build a nice compo.

The large amount of luck in card drawing - without options to mitigate it, ruined Bruges for me.
I really don't see the card draw as being that limiting in Bruges. You can always do something, and it's very rare you end up with such bad cards that your game is foiled.

In Rialto, your choice is severely limited by turn order, and the cards you get aren't always useful. In Bruges, I can almost always find uses for the cards. I just might have to change the direction I was building on.
I disagree. In Brügge the cards play you. You have no chance to plan ahead since if you do not draw the right colour every plan falls apart. You can only try to make the best of the cards you get, ie everything depends on the luck of the card draw. In Rialto you choose the cards you get. Yes, the choice deoends on the player order but you can influence that, too.

Furthermore the tings that happen on the board are quite unimportant in Brügge (you will not win throiugh building channels) but they are important in Rialto.
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Originaldibbler wrote:
In Brügge the cards play you. You have no chance to plan ahead since if you do not draw the right colour every plan falls apart. You can only try to make the best of the cards you get, ie everything depends on the luck of the card draw. In Rialto you choose the cards you get. Yes, the choice deoends on the player order but you can influence that, too.

Furthermore the tings that happen on the board are quite unimportant in Brügge (you will not win throiugh building channels) but they are important in Rialto.
That's my point exactly! After games like Castles of Burgundy and Bora Bora, this plays much like your average family game: draw cards and see what we can do with them...

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GeoMan wrote:
Originaldibbler wrote:
In Brügge the cards play you. You have no chance to plan ahead since if you do not draw the right colour every plan falls apart. You can only try to make the best of the cards you get, ie everything depends on the luck of the card draw. In Rialto you choose the cards you get. Yes, the choice deoends on the player order but you can influence that, too.

Furthermore the tings that happen on the board are quite unimportant in Brügge (you will not win throiugh building channels) but they are important in Rialto.
That's my point exactly! After games like Castles of Burgundy and Bora Bora, this plays much like your average family game: draw cards and see what we can do with them...

Unlike CoB, where you roll dice and see what you can do with them. The only difference is in CoB, there are only 6 possible values.
 
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clydeiii wrote:
GeoMan wrote:
Originaldibbler wrote:
In Brügge the cards play you. You have no chance to plan ahead since if you do not draw the right colour every plan falls apart. You can only try to make the best of the cards you get, ie everything depends on the luck of the card draw. In Rialto you choose the cards you get. Yes, the choice deoends on the player order but you can influence that, too.

Furthermore the tings that happen on the board are quite unimportant in Brügge (you will not win throiugh building channels) but they are important in Rialto.
That's my point exactly! After games like Castles of Burgundy and Bora Bora, this plays much like your average family game: draw cards and see what we can do with them...

Unlike CoB, where you roll dice and see what you can do with them. The only difference is in CoB, there are only 6 possible values.
It took a moment to figure out that CoB is not Children of Bodom but Castles of Burgundy here.

I am not a huge fan of Castles of Burgundy either. Nevertheless there are yellow tiles and worker chips that let you modify your die roll in order to give you lots of options. If you draw a red card in Brügge it stays red no matter what you do.
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Yes, I realize. It just struct me as a funny parallel is all.

Also, I lived I Finland and wasn't even aware of this:
Quote:
Children of Bodom is a Finnish extreme metal band from Espoo. Formed in 1993, the group currently consists of Alexi Laiho, Roope Latvala, Janne Wirman, Henkka Seppälä, and Jaska Raatikainen.
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I completely understand what you are saying about not being able to plan ahead in Bruges, but I have never felt like the cards are playing me. There always seem to be several beneficial actions despite which cards are drawn! Also, I have found that there are people you can recruit to somewhat mitigate the luck factor.
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tibahn wrote:
I completely understand what you are saying about not being able to plan ahead in Bruges, but I have never felt like the cards are playing me. There always seem to be several beneficial actions despite which cards are drawn! Also, I have found that there are people you can recruit to somewhat mitigate the luck factor.
There are beneficial actions with every card, but the one who gets the right ones will get a much better bonus.

Also some card's benefits depend on the dice rolled - the ones that give you some extra workers for example, depending on a roll of 5 or 6.

Too much is left to luck and there are no options to mitigate it (like the tiles in Burgundy that modify the dice).

I hope that Feld isn't going to follow on the Knizia's steps so soon...
 
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GeoMan wrote:
There are beneficial actions with every card, but the one who gets the right ones will get a much better bonus.

Also some card's benefits depend on the dice rolled - the ones that give you some extra workers for example, depending on a roll of 5 or 6.

Too much is left to luck and there are no options to mitigate it (like the tiles in Burgundy that modify the dice).

I hope that Feld isn't going to follow on the Knizia's steps so soon...
Just curious: When you have played, have been players who have felt completely shut out by what cards they drew? And if yes, have there scores been very far off from everybody else's?
 
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GeoMan wrote:
tibahn wrote:
I completely understand what you are saying about not being able to plan ahead in Bruges, but I have never felt like the cards are playing me. There always seem to be several beneficial actions despite which cards are drawn! Also, I have found that there are people you can recruit to somewhat mitigate the luck factor.
There are beneficial actions with every card, but the one who gets the right ones will get a much better bonus.

Also some card's benefits depend on the dice rolled - the ones that give you some extra workers for example, depending on a roll of 5 or 6.

Too much is left to luck and there are no options to mitigate it (like the tiles in Burgundy that modify the dice).

I hope that Feld isn't going to follow on the Knizia's steps so soon...
WAIT... you mean to tell me that a game with cards and dice has an inherent amount of luck and randomness involved?

Regarding the cards that give you benefits dependent on the numbers rolled: those Workers are worth 0 VP at game's end. They also trigger upon the roll of a 5 or 6, which means the benefit of getting an extra worker is offset by taking a threat marker. So, while you might you that extra worker to build a house, rolling 5 or 6 repeatedly for those perks is going to cost you houses or workers or equivalent in the long run.

In the initial game of Bruges I played, I had 3 of these types of workers (Red, Yellow, and Purple)... and let's just say that I didn't win. Let's instead say that I lost by a fairly sizeable margin to players who had prior experience and knew what they were doing.

Yes, it's a very tactical game. Typically, you have a choice between one of two colored cards on your turn, after which you need to figure out the most efficient way to play those cards. My only real gripe was that most of the interaction came via the game interacting with the players rather than the players interacting with each other. Aside from some cards that made opponent's discard, you really only interacted when it came to check majorities.

Finally, alluding to the fact that Feld is becoming like Knizia is just ridiculous. The only similarity there is that Feld, this year only, is putting out games at a prolific clip. At least his games aren't horribly math-y derivations of something he or someone else has already done.
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GeoMan wrote:
tibahn wrote:
I completely understand what you are saying about not being able to plan ahead in Bruges, but I have never felt like the cards are playing me. There always seem to be several beneficial actions despite which cards are drawn! Also, I have found that there are people you can recruit to somewhat mitigate the luck factor.
There are beneficial actions with every card, but the one who gets the right ones will get a much better bonus.

Also some card's benefits depend on the dice rolled - the ones that give you some extra workers for example, depending on a roll of 5 or 6.

Too much is left to luck and there are no options to mitigate it (like the tiles in Burgundy that modify the dice).

I hope that Feld isn't going to follow on the Knizia's steps so soon...
You mitigate the luck by not playing luck filled cards like the '5 or 6 card'. That really isn't a very strong card, and you never have to play it. Even if you don't want to play any of the cards in your hand, then you can lay the foundations to build a bunch in the future by building houses and generating $. Then when you get People you want to employ, you can just put them down. Some of the People are luck based, but some of those same people help mitigate luck (i.e. draw 6 cards, etc). It's still a light weight game, but the cards don't play you. You just have to make some tactical decisions with what to do with your cards.

This isn't a game to compare to Macao or Trajan. It plays in half of the time.
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mfaulk80 wrote:

This isn't a game to compare to Macao or Trajan. It plays in half of the time.
That's right. It is a rather quick game with multi-purpose cards. Therefore is has to be compared with games like RftG, Glory to Rome or Uchronia...
 
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