Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
13 Posts

Magic: The Gathering» Forums » General

Subject: Please help me become better in building sideboards rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Daniël Muilwijk
Netherlands
Zeist
Utrecht
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have ten guild-themed Return to Ravnica decks that I like to pit against each other. They are a blast to play for me and my friends! They don’t have Magic cards themselves, so I just hand them over a deck. There are some unfavourable match-ups though. Partly that is caused by not having sideboards.

Sideboards help to even out the playing field, at least a little, because ideally the sideboard exists of cards that help you in those difficult matches. But when I sat down to build those sideboards I came to the conclusion that I suck at it. I mean, it’s one thing to build a deck and think of how all the parts should work together, but it’s another to build a sideboard where you have to have all the possible match-ups in mind.

Right now all of my ten decks have a sideboard, but it’s far from perfect. I’ve decided to come to you for a little help.

Before we dive into the ten sideboards that I’ve constructed, I want to mention some things:

- My cardpool consists of 4x each common, 2x each uncommon and 1x each cheap rare (less than 2 dollar a piece) of the Return to Ravnica Block. I only intent to play casually, and although I know some decks can be improved by buying extra cards, I have no intention to do so. Buying extra cards would cost me more money, but it won’t add more fun, so I don’t think it’s worth it. So please keep your suggestions within my cardpool. As a consequence, remember that I only have 4 Naturalize, for example, to divide over my ten decks.

- My decks are all two coloured, guild-themed, 60-card decks. Cards with a guild-mark on them are not allowed to appear in a deck of another guild. I have this rule purely for aesthetics, but I like it that way. I know this narrows down my options, but it helped to let my decks feel unique and it prevented decks having too many keywords. Remember, I only play with casual players.

- About our own little metagame; when me and my friends play Magic we randomly are assigned a deck and pit those against each other. So you can see this as an environment where each deck takes up 10% of the metagame and where there are no mirror-matches. I hope this information helps to give constructive feedback on the sideboards.

The problem with my sideboards right now is that it mostly consist of cards that just didn’t make the cut for the mainboard. Although some of these cards can be cute under the right circumstances, I think I can do better with my sideboards. What would you put in? What are the weaknesses of the decks? Which bad match-ups should I sideboard for? How do I do this? Can you give me an example? I hope you can give me some feedback, because I really want to learn about this subject.

So, without further ado, here are my ten decks, including sideboards.
(PS: These take up a lot of space in this post. Is there a way that I can minimize this?)

Azorius wrote:
Lands (23)
4 Azorius Guildgate
10 Plains
9 Island

Creatures (27)
4 Azorius Arrester
4 Deputy of Acquittals
2 New Prahv Guildmage
1 Precinct Captain
4 Stealer of Secrets
4 Court Street Denizen
2 Lyev Skyknight
2 Skymark Roc
2 Azorius Justiciar
1 Lavinia of the Tenth
1 Isperia, Supreme Judge

Other Spells (10)
2 Azorius Charm
2 Arrest
1 Detention Sphere
2 Cancel
1 Martial Law
2 Syncopate

Sideboard
1 Archon of the Triumvirate
1 Righteous Authority
2 Ascended Lawmage
2 Restore the Peace
2 Judge's Familiar
3 Inaction Injunction
2 Dramatic Rescue
2 Keening Apparition
Orzhov wrote:
Lands (22)
4 Orzhov Guildgate
9 Plains
9 Swamp

Creatures (27)
4 Dutiful Thrull
2 Thrull Parasite
4 Basilica Screecher
3 Syndic of Tithes
4 Tithe Drinker
2 Vizkopa Guildmage
1 High Priest of Penance
4 Kingpin's Pet
1 Crypt Ghast
1 Alms Beast
1 Pontiff of Blight

Other Spells (11)
4 Smite
2 Soul Tithe
2 Orzhov Charm
1 Underworld Connections
2 One Thousand Lashes

Sideboard
1 Immortal Servitude
1 Treasury Thrull
2 Sin Collector
2 Gift of Orzhova
1 Syndic of Tithes
3 Basilica Guards
2 Keening Apparition
2 Beckon Apparition
1 Crypt Incursion
boros wrote:
Lands (23)
4 Boros Guildgate
10 Plains
9 Mountain

Creatures (27)
2 Boros Elite
2 Firefist Striker
3 Daring Skyjek
4 Wojek Halberdiers
2 Sunhome Guildmage
2 Truefire Paladin
4 Skyknight Legionnaire
4 Viashino Firstblade
1 Firemane Avenger
1 Tajic, Blade of the Legion
1 Spark Trooper
1 Foundry Champion

Spells (10)
2 Madcap Skills
2 Martial Glory
2 Boros Charm
2 Annihilating Fire
2 Warleader's Helix

Sideboard
1 Assemble the Legion
1 Boros Battleshaper
2 Wear // Tear
1 Daring Skyjek
2 Martial Glory
2 Foundry Street Denizen
4 Mugging
2 Armored Transport
Selesnya wrote:
Lands (23)
4 Selesnya Guildgate
9 Plains
9 Forest
1 Grove of the Guardian

Creatures (17)
4 Centaur's Herald
4 Gatecreeper Vine
2 Vitu-Ghazi Guildmage
1 Wayfaring Temple
2 Phantom General
2 Bronzebeak Moa
1 Scion of Vitu-Ghazi
1 Trostani's Summoner

Other Spells (20)
4 Giant Growth
2 Druid's Deliverance
2 Call of the Conclave
2 Selesnya Charm
4 Rootborn Defenses
1 Growing Ranks
4 Eyes in the Skies
1 Collective Blessing

Sideboard
1 Trostani's Summoner
2 Unflinching Courage
2 Druid's Deliverance
2 Dryad Militant
2 Centaur Healer
2 Sundering Growth
2 Trostani's Judgment
2 Common Bond
Dimir wrote:
Lands (23)
4 Dimir Guildgate
9 Island
10 Swamp

Creatures (11)
2 Wight of Precinct Six
2 Duskmantle Guildmage
2 Dimir Keyrune
3 Deathcult Rogue
1 Consuming Aberration
1 Mirko Vosk, Mind Drinker

Other Spells (26)
4 Death's Approach
2 Dimir Charm
2 Warped Physique
3 Paranoid Delusions
4 Pilfered Plans
3 Psychic Strike
1 Soul Ransom
4 Grisly Spectacle
2 Far // Away
1 Mind Grind

Sideboard
1 Deathcult Rogue
1 Paranoid Delusions
1 Psychic Strike
2 Woodlot Crawler
2 Ætherize
2 Ultimate Price
3 Devour Flesh
3 Crypt Incursion
izzet wrote:
Lands (25)
4 Izzet Guildgate
10 Island
11 Mountain

Creatures (16)
2 Nivix Guildmage
4 Goblin Electromancer
2 Guttersnipe
4 Nivix Cyclops
2 Fluxcharger
1 Mercurial Chemister
1 Melek, Izzet Paragon

Other Spells (19)
2 Mizzium Skin
3 Weapon Surge
2 Teleportal
1 Mizzium Mortars
1 Cyclonic Rift
2 Izzet Charm
1 Counterflux
1 Dragonshift
2 Essence Backlash
2 Thoughtflare
2 Turn // Burn

Sideboard
1 Hypersonic Dragon
2 Izzet Staticaster
1 Weapon Surge
2 Mizzium Skin
4 Frostburn Weird
3 Dispel
2 Lobber Crew
Simic wrote:
Lands (23)
4 Simic Guildgate
10 Island
9 Forest

Creatures (25)
4 Cloudfin Raptor
2 Experiment One
4 Shambleshark
2 Zameck Guildmage
1 Gyre Sage
2 Crocanura
2 Elusive Krasis
2 Drakewing Krasis
1 Vorel of the Hull Clade
1 Renegade Krasis
2 Crowned Ceratok
1 Fathom Mage
1 Species Gorger

Other Spells (12)
3 Bioshift
2 Simic Charm
2 Spell Rupture
2 Bred for the Hunt
2 Krasis Incubation
1 Biomass Mutation

Sideboard
2 Forced Adaptation
3 Burst of Strength
2 Naturalize
1 Ooze Flux
2 Mutant's Prey
2 Crocanura
1 Drakewing Krasis
1 Bioshift
1 Adaptive Snapjaw
Rakdos wrote:
Lands (24)
4 Rakdos Guildgate
10 Swamp
10 Mountain

Creatures (27)
2 Foundry Street Denizen
2 Rakdos Cackler
1 Gore-House Chainwalker
2 Rix Maadi Guildmage
4 Rakdos Shred-Freak
2 Spike Jester
4 Splatter Thug
2 Hellhole Flailer
1 Cryptborn Horror
2 Bloodfray Giant
2 Carnage Gladiator
1 Exava, Rakdos Blood Witch
1 Chaos Imps
1 Carnival Hellsteed

Other Spells (9)
2 Skullcrack
2 Rakdos Charm
3 Auger Spree
2 Toil // Trouble

Sideboard
2 Showstopper
2 Deviant Glee
2 Shadow Alley Denizen
1 Ogre Slumlord
2 Madcap Skills
2 Act of Treason
1 Explosive Impact
2 Gore-House Chainwalker
1 Auger Spree
Golgari wrote:
Lands (25)
4 Golgari Guildgate
11 Swamp
10 Forest

Creatures (17)
2 Slitherhead
2 Korozda Guildmage
3 Sewer Shambler
3 Dreg Mangler
2 Sluiceway Scorpion
2 Rot Farm Skeleton
1 Corpsejack Menace
1 Deadbridge Goliath
1 Jarad, Golgari Lich Lord

Other Spells (18)
2 Alpha Authority
4 Drown in Filth
4 Grisly Salvage
2 Treasured Find
2 Golgari Charm
2 Putrefy
2 Down // Dirty

Sideboard
1 Naturalize
1 Rubbleback Rhino
3 Trestle Troll
1 Sewer Shambler
2 Korozda Gorgon
3 Daggerdrome Imp
2 Sluiceway Scorpion
2 Golgari Keyrune
Gruul wrote:
Lands (24)
4 Gruul Guildgate
10 Mountain
10 Forest

Creatures (25)
2 Burning-Tree Emissary
4 Zhur-Taa Druid
2 Skarrg Guildmage
4 Slaughterhorn
1 Wild Beastmaster
1 Pyrewild Shaman
1 Rubblebelt Raiders
3 Rubblebelt Maaka
2 Ghor-Clan Rampager
1 Wrecking Ogre
1 Zhur-Taa Swine
1 Rubblehulk
1 Ruric Thar, the Unbowed
1 Giant Adephage

Other Spells (11)
4 Pit Fight
2 Ground Assault
2 Gruul Charm
2 Armed // Dangerous
1 Clan Defiance

Sideboard
1 Gruul Ragebeast
2 Gruul War Chant
2 Zhur-Taa Swine
2 Wasteland Viper
1 Rubblebelt Maaka
1 Naturalize
2 Frenzied Tilling
1 Sylvan Primordial
3 Axebane Guardian
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kostas K.
Greece
Athens
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I' ll be honest and say that I can't really go through all commons/uncommons of the RtR block and compare them against all your decklists. It would help a lot if you could mention which of your decks struggle the most, and which match-ups are the most one-sided.

However a general rule is that what you really don't want to have in a sideboard is cards that were left out of the main deck because they did the same things as cards in the main deck, only less efficiently (which is exactly what you described).
You should really try to find each deck's weaknesses (which types of decks it struggles the most against, what types of threats it doesn't have an answer to, etc. For example, black/red decks commonly have a problem dealing with enchantments.)

Due to your limited card pool, you can also consider concetrating all sideboards into one binder (so you can go through them more easily) and use the whole binder as a common sideboard. This will open up some extra options.

Finally, if you aren't too attached to all ten decks, you can take some of them apart in order to increase the options of the rest, or maybe even try splashing a 3rd color in some decks.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniël Muilwijk
Netherlands
Zeist
Utrecht
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
kostool13 wrote:
I' ll be honest and say that I can't really go through all commons/uncommons of the RtR block and compare them against all your decklists.
Of course, I get that.

Quote:
It would help a lot if you could mention which of your decks struggle the most, and which match-ups are the most one-sided.
I haven't played all the combinations, so I'm not sure about this one. The decks I have are pretty straight forward though, so general rules apply here. For example, my Boros deck is just a 'get out of the gates with at least three creatures as fast as possible'-deck, and I thought some of you would know what kind of decks are most troublesome for such a deck. So I don't expect you to look through all my decks and analyse our metagame carefully. Instead I'm just interested in general tips for my sideboards.

Quote:
However a general rule is that what you really don't want to have in a sideboard is cards that were left out of the main deck because they did the same things as cards in the main deck, only less efficiently (which is exactly what you described).
I hope some of you can point me at some of those cards, because for me it is not immediatly clear whether cards fall in those categories or not.

Quote:
You should really try to find each deck's weaknesses (which types of decks it struggles the most against, what types of threats it doesn't have an answer to, etc. For example, black/red decks commonly have a problem dealing with enchantments.)
This is a hard part for me. You would help me out by saying things like "I expect this deck to have problems against this and this deck, so that's why you should put this and this card in your sideboard" or "This card does more of the same, and cards in the mainboard do it better, so you should leave it out".

Quote:
Due to your limited card pool, you can also consider concetrating all sideboards into one binder (so you can go through them more easily) and use the whole binder as a common sideboard. This will open up some extra options.
A very reasonable option for if this won't work out.

Quote:
Finally, if you aren't too attached to all ten decks, you can take some of them apart in order to increase the options of the rest, or maybe even try splashing a 3rd color in some decks.
Oh I love all of these ten decks! It would bring me to tears if I would tear them apart...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian Cox
United States
Sugar Land
Texas
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Is the gentleman with the BroStache invited to this party?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Awesome! I've been meaning to do something like this. For me it really helps to try to bring out he theme of playing each guild in Ravnica.

I'm definitely going to use this as a basis to build my guild theme decks.

As to your question about Sideboards: There are people who post on these forums that are far more knowledgeable than me, but in my experience and from what I've researched, you want your deck to focus on what you want it to do, and your sideboard to cover the weaknesses.

For instance, let's take a generic deck a person would build that has good Creature removal, but doesn't have anything to combat Enchantments or Artifacts. That person would probably want to put some Enchantment and Artifact removal in the sideboard in case they came across an opponent whose deck was light on creatures.

Something like this happened to me, when I pitted my Dimir deck against my friend's Selesnya Deck. My Dimir deck was focused on milling his deck and increasing the Power and Toughness of my creatures who needed creatures in the opponents graveyard (Wight of Precinct Six and Lazav, Dimir Mastermind). Funny thing is, when the tokens from his Selesnya Populate deck were removed from play, they never went to the graveyard, so I didn't get the benefits of Wight of Precinct Six and Lazav, Dimir Mastermind. Also, when I milled his deck, it was all populating spells with very few creatures.

In this instance, it would've been great for me to be able to sideboard in something to stop his populate ability before it got rolling.

All that being said, just play with these decks a few more times and keep tweaking them as you go. If one guild ALWAYS beats another guild, figure out why this is and add the cards to the sideboard to change that.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniël Muilwijk
Netherlands
Zeist
Utrecht
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fuzzydice82 wrote:
I'm definitely going to use this as a basis to build my guild theme decks.
Thanks, I hope you have fun. I know we have!

Quote:
For instance, let's take a generic deck a person would build that has good Creature removal, but doesn't have anything to combat Enchantments or Artifacts. That person would probably want to put some Enchantment and Artifact removal in the sideboard in case they came across an opponent whose deck was light on creatures.
My Dimir, Izzet and Rakdos deck come to mind. The problem is, in those colours there is no good Enchantment removal. So even though I know that is their weakness, those decks simply don't have access to good enchantment removal. I don't know how to fix such problems. Any ideas?

Quote:
Something like this happened to me, when I pitted my Dimir deck against my friend's Selesnya Deck. My Dimir deck was focused on milling his deck and increasing the Power and Toughness of my creatures who needed creatures in the opponents graveyard (Wight of Precinct Six and Lazav, Dimir Mastermind). Funny thing is, when the tokens from his Selesnya Populate deck were removed from play, they never went to the graveyard, so I didn't get the benefits of Wight of Precinct Six and Lazav, Dimir Mastermind. Also, when I milled his deck, it was all populating spells with very few creatures.

In this instance, it would've been great for me to be able to sideboard in something to stop his populate ability before it got rolling.
That sounds like a bad match-up indeed, but in case of my own Dimir deck I tried to answer that by building my sideboard in such a way that the deck can be changed to a pure removal and mill deck, without relying on creatures like Precinct. A lot of the removal is very cheap, so the deck should be able to remove the tokens before the populate machine gets going. And AEtherize is in it purely for the Selesnya match-up. So I guess I got that covered, in a way. I hope this gives some insight in how I came up with my sideboard for Dimir.

Quote:
All that being said, just play with these decks a few more times and keep tweaking them as you go. If one guild ALWAYS beats another guild, figure out why this is and add the cards to the sideboard to change that.
I will do that for sure (although it will be hard to play all the match-ups; there are 45 of them!). The cards I listed are my first attempt at a sideboard and I hoped the people here would be able to filter out the 'newbie mistakes'.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniël Muilwijk
Netherlands
Zeist
Utrecht
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
b a n j o wrote:
For each deck, I recommend the following system:
I will try to do that, even though I'm not sure I have the knowledge to do it. For example, I have a hard time to see which is a good and which is a bad match-up for my Azorius deck.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrés Santiago Pérez-Bergquist
United States
Mountain View
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
In order to make truly effective sideboards, you need to tailor them for a specific environment where you know what kinds of decks you'll be facing and identify ways to plug your weaknesses that they would otherwise exploit and to take advantage of theirs. For casual play, though, you just need to generalize to the sorts of strategies you might be facing and how to improve against them.

The way I do it to design my main deck to the be the more aggressive, less interactive version of my overall plan that just tries to run full steam ahead. After game one, when I've seen what my opponent is trying to do and how he plans to stop me, I can swap in more reactive, controlling cards to aim to disrupt his specific strategy. Key categories are:

• Targeted Removal — Silver bullet spells aimed at taking out crucial creatures, enchantments, artifacts, or even lands.
• More Counterspells — Once I know what is important to counter and what isn't, I can use them more effectively and know on which turns I need to hold back to stop key enemy plays. They're also for protecting my key spells against enemy counterspells.
• Sweepers — In particular, cheap sweepers like Pyroclasm can be devastatingly effective at slowing down aggressive decks to give you time to fight back. More expensive sweepers that clean the whole board let you fight back against midrange decks and token engines, or dealing with untargetable creatures.
• Walls — Having a few cheap, effective blockers to deal with aggressive decks can be useful and is a good counterpoint to sweepers. Non-creature ways of gumming up attackers fall in this category as well.
• High Risk, High Rewards — These are cards specific to my strategy that can be very effective, but are vulnerable to disruption, such as beefy creatures with no defenses against removal. If you determine game one that your opponent doesn't have effective answers to them, you can bring them in. This is really sort of a corner case.

One very useful disruptive card that belongs in your main deck and not your sideboard is targeted discard. This is because, for the cards that let you look at your opponent's hand, it provides key early-game information about your opponent's plan and capabilities, and you can make effective use of it without having seen the deck, since it lets you see part of the deck.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sean Raffuse
United States
San Rafael
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
One thing you will need to be comfortable with is that the match-ups will always favor one deck over the other, especially in the environment you have set up. Even after sideboarding, there will be holes. For example, Dimir has very few ways to interact with enchantments. I can think of one in the block, but it is rare and temporary (Cyclonic Rift). The best you can hope to do with your sideboards is to understand where each deck fits in your metagame and react accordingly.

One approach is to understand your metagame clock (i.e., which deck is the aggressor in each matchup). To get what I am saying here, I suggest Googling and reading "Who's the Beatdown". In essence, in each match-up one deck is trying to end the game quickly with it's aggressive cards while the other is trying extend it by staying alive until it's more expensive and more powerful cards can take over the game. I haven't stared at your decklists, but a rough guess of ranking from most aggro to most control/attrition based on my drafting experience might be:
Boros>Rakdos>Gruul>Azorius>Izzet>Simic>Dimir>Selesnya>Orzhov>Golgari

Your sideboard cards could help to make your deck more or less reactive depending on the situation. For example, if Golgari is facing Boros, Golgari needs to lower it's mana curve to ensure it survives the early game. Add some cheap blockers/removal and take out some of your expensive cards. On the other side of the coin, Boros would like to add cards that can punch through blockers or do the last few points of damage outside of combat.

Sideboard cards are not those that just missed the cut. The classic sideboard card is one that is awesome in specific contexts and useless in others. For example, Electrickery is a great sideboard card. Against Boros, Rakdos, and Azorius, it could be a total blowout. Against Golgari, Gruul, and Simic, it is nearly a dead card.

This is a very complex topic. Another approach would be to skip sideboarding for now. You should definitely start keeping some stats on what beats what.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tommy Occhipinti
United States
Decorah
Iowa
flag msg tools
Magic Fanboy
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
For something like this, I'd never include sideboards. Sideboarding is incredibly difficult, and you can't possibly do it without a rather deep understanding of the matchups involved. I would suggest you wait on sideboarding until you have a lot more experience with the game.

Have you played these decks against each other by yourself? That is the best way to tweak decks. Play both sides and watch what happens. If you do that enough, you can improve the decks a lot, and you'll understand what sorts of cards help in what sorts of matches.

Also, I should note, there is a really great episode of Limited Resources on sideboarding (found here: http://lrcast.com/limited-resources-185-sideboard-strategy-w... ). The show is about limited, of course, so there are some differences, but a lot of the principles about what you are looking for in a match-up apply.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniël Muilwijk
Netherlands
Zeist
Utrecht
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
delirimouse wrote:
For something like this, I'd never include sideboards. Sideboarding is incredibly difficult, and you can't possibly do it without a rather deep understanding of the matchups involved. I would suggest you wait on sideboarding until you have a lot more experience with the game.
I've came to the conclusion as well that sideboarding is hard. It's a lot more subtle and game changing than I originally thought. I'm willing to go the extra mile here though.

But, for what it's worth, I'm not aiming for the perfect sideboards. I'm just aiming for reasonable sideboards that give the players some decent choices in between games. I also know it's quite a task to take on, and I probably should be way more experienced with Magic to be able do it well, but it's an activity that I really enjoy. Although I only play casually, Magic has been on my mind every day for over a year now. Extending these home-brew decks is simply a pleasant activity for me.

Raffscallion wrote:
This is a very complex topic. Another approach would be to skip sideboarding for now. You should definitely start keeping some stats on what beats what.
delirimouse wrote:
Have you played these decks against each other by yourself? That is the best way to tweak decks. Play both sides and watch what happens. If you do that enough, you can improve the decks a lot, and you'll understand what sorts of cards help in what sorts of matches.
I've played a couple of match-ups myself, but not enough. The comments of both of you made me search a bit further though, and I just found the program Forge. It's a perfect program to test these decks against each other. I will use that program to play all the different match-ups and come up with some conclusions. I started with me playing Orzhov and the AI playing Azorius and it already gave me some very helpfull insight! (as it turns out, detain is a pretty bad mechanism against Orzhov, because extort isn't an activated ability, so detaining doesn't work, arrest doesn't do a lot of work for the same reasons, and counterspells don't prevent extort from happening as well... talk about a bad match-up!)

I should add that I play these matches against the computer without the sideboards I listed above. I do take notes though what I would have sideboarded in in those cases. And I take notes about the feel of the matches as well. Once I have some decent data I'll surely report it here.

Quote:
Also, I should note, there is a really great episode of Limited Resources on sideboarding
Thanks, I will listen to that tomorrow!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniël Muilwijk
Netherlands
Zeist
Utrecht
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I've listened to the podcast, it was quite entertaining and it gave me a little bit more insight into sideboarding.

I've tried to pit my decks against each other using Forge, but the AI there is a bit lacking. Are there better alternatives to test these decks out?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tommy Occhipinti
United States
Decorah
Iowa
flag msg tools
Magic Fanboy
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Seabie wrote:
I've listened to the podcast, it was quite entertaining and it gave me a little bit more insight into sideboarding.

I've tried to pit my decks against each other using Forge, but the AI there is a bit lacking. Are there better alternatives to test these decks out?
Nothing will be better than playing them by yourself on your kitchen table. You want to see both sides at the same time.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls