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Subject: Interesting Backstory rss

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Oliver Kiley
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Thanks for recognizing the backstory. I admit it isn't super detailed at this point - but I do have a lot of thoughts running in my head about how it can continue to be expanded.
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Kevin Brown
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Interesting that it isn't typical space opera fare of multiple alien races. I like the notion of the game being a mostly human endeavor. Sure, the humans are altered to the point where they are essentially aliens... but they are still human. This combined with the more political/managerial strucyure does a good job of making the game less fanciful and roots it in 'reality'.
More Dune & Hyperion than Star Wars IMHO. I like it.
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Oliver Kiley
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Yes - Dune certainly comes to mind.

Hyperion IS my all-time favorite story/series. I also really enjoy the Revelation Space series and Peter F. Hamilton's Commonwealth/Void series. While there are some aliens here and there in Hamilton's work - by the bulk of the above series focus on humanity.

Oh - and perhaps the biggest direct influence was another Simmon's work - the Illium/Olympos novels. Among other things, it had an advanced strain of humans that became "gods" through quantum manipulation and related technologies - in terms of both power and that they chose to fashion themselves after the Greek pantheon. Hence - the Great Houses containing the mythological roots.

The other inspiration(s) drew from theoretical physics and some of the crazier concepts coming out of string/M-theory and how they could be extrapolated out to far-future technologies.

EDIT: As an aside - I also wanted the whole thing to be a bit of a commentary on humankind's expansionist mentality. What does it say about our ambitions and ability to live within our means that we see fit to not only fill up our home galaxy (i.e. the Milky Way) - but now see fit to go and take over another one? There is a bit of an ethical/moral undertone there if you choose to read into it that way. Nothing is stated in obvious terms like that, but it's a thought I had in the early days. It does relate to the game's title of course.
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Ben Rubinstein

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korxonthos wrote:
I like how the fluff integrates eastern spirituality into sci-fi. I find it quite interesting how even some of the tech card names have a very subtle, Buddhist/Hindu feel to them. I find that most sci-fi is either dystopian or overly secularized, and I'm glad that Hegemonic's backstory stands out.


You should read Dune. It's got really interesting religious inclusion.
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Wim van Gruisen
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korxonthos wrote:
I find that most sci-fi is either dystopian or overly secularized.


korxonthos wrote:
[...] reading fiction and me mix together like TNT and fire. I simply cannot sit down and read even a 200-page novel. If I do, it takes me an inordinately long time to finish even a couple of chapters, and if I force myself to read faster than I normally read, I forgo 60% of my understanding and even begin falling asleep.

OK, curious. How did you form your opinion of sci-fi if you don't read sci-fi?
Movies, TV series and such are all nice, but the heart of SF, the daring ideas and grand concepts, are all found in the books. By discounting those, you miss quite a lot and your view of the genre is inevitably skewed.
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Wim van Gruisen
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So you base your idea that most SF is dystopian or secularized on the reading of science books?
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Wim van Gruisen
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korxonthos wrote:
OK fine. Denounce me as some nut-head philistine who doesn't read novels. I have been hating novels since my childhood. I never had any good experiences, so I feel that reading novels is arduous.

I didn't have the intention of denouncing you as anything. Sorry if you read that in my posts. Everyone has their own preferences. As I said in my first message, I was curious on what you based your opinion of SF on, as you don't read books.

Religion is a theme in a number of good SF books. Dune and the Hyperion cantos have already been mentioned. Zelazny's Lord of Light is another good one (and has the advantage of being significantly less bulky than the previous two). Riverworld is another example, as Moorcock's Behold the Man. And there are lots more with religious themes.
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Christian Gindlesperger
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http://www.audible.com/search/ref=search_tseft__galileo?advs...

...if you're curious and inclined, there are other options. (You might also be surprised at the wealth of audiobooks at your local library, or available to borrow online.)

I'm an former English major who just doesn't have the time and energy to crack open the physical books these days--if I do, I tend to get droopy-eyed and fall asleep within minutes. Listening to a book while driving or exercising or doing almost anything is a nice alternative for us literary narcoleptics.

But, of course, gaming and drawing are equally valid and rich imaginary experiences, so by all means, follow your bliss.

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Wim van Gruisen
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I found a few short (and quite famous) SF stories involving religion, by Arthur C. Clarke, on PDF. They give a small taste of how SF can treat religion. One story is six pages long, the other four pages. If this length doesn't put you off, I hope that you enjoy them.

The stories are easily fifty to sixty years old, BTW, but IMHO still enjoyable. Just disregard the difference between computers of sixty years ago and today.

The Nine Billion Names of God: http://maggiemcneill.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/the-nine-bi...
The Star: http://www.uni.edu/morgans/astro/course/TheStar.pdf
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