Recommend
35 
 Thumb up
 Hide
13 Posts

Rise and Decline of the Third Reich» Forums » Sessions

Subject: A Most Audacious Game part 11 rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Patrick Bauer
United States
Reading
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Waste Water too
badge
Mid-Atlantic Air Museum
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Axis Winter 1940: Plan Audacious II


Last turn the Allies laid a pasting on the German Luftwaffe, but the combination of air losses and the previous season’s heavy attrition cost left France with a grim choice: reserve 15 BRPs and face Germany with a thin line or build heavy. Steve chose the latter as many Third Reich players would. But once again, his rear echelon is not configured optimally.


While my variant based strategy will no longer be fruitful, an immediate French exit will certainly salve the bitter wounds I have so far suffered. I am despondent with my deplorable showing in this game. I feel as if I have cheated my opponents of their valuable time. If I can find a way to take Paris the Allies will have no recourse: France can’t pay for an offensive and Britain’s armor is scattered (Anglo-French rules prohibit any kind of solely British liberation other than its armor exploiting through and beyond Paris). When I saw the French builds of the fall, the wheels began to turn in my head. Three days later the British build and SR file arrived. It took less than a hour for me to return the Axis Options file: Germany- West Offensive, East & Med Attrition.

I will once again attack Metz with a large armored force, drop the Fallschirmjäger on the rear, and if successful exploit on to Paris for a 1:1. The major powers are much weaker this time around: Operation Big Wing II has reduced the entire Axis in theater air to just 10 factors, all of which must counter air the 10 French based in Strasbourg. I’ve made it sound like Steve made a mistake, in truth he did no such thing. Seldom in Third Reich is any airless, large scale campaign successful. Steve played the odds and a saner less desperate Axis honcho would not be attempting this. Without the air to provide ground strikes, the airborne must clear the rear echelon hex on a 1:2 (48.57% chance of success). But if it fails all I’ll have lost is the AB and my armor can still make gainful attacks.

So I move the bulk of the armor to the point of attack, fly my rag tag air force into position and square off with the Wadfist in Algeria for an attrition.







The attrition nets nothing. My counter air costs me only the Italian factor. Plan Audacious is set:





I attack the two French infantry with four armored corps. With this portion of the Maginot having already been destroyed it’s a 2:1 and the hex is cleared with ease. Then comes the critical airborne action against the completely surprised Fr 10Inf, a 1:2 CA 1:2. I roll a 2 and score the exchange. Once again an entire hex is denuded of units in a German airborne operation that opens the door to Paris! The exploiting armor plows through the French zones of control and arrives at the gates of Paris. All that stands in the way is the Fr 2GCM who had at the year’s onset so valiantly defended The City of Light.





This is 8:6 --> a 1:1 CA 1:3. A straight up 50% chance of occupying Paris. Considering all that I’ve been through I make the roll with a wonderful mix of excitement and trepidation. Steve and Doug have been beside themselves during the files; first discounting the idea and then brutally destroyed by the successful 1:2. This is what Third Reich is all about.

I roll a 4: a big Exchange. Everything dies and Paris remains in French control.






I rebuild with a heavier heart than the last time. I learn the lesson of Big Wing II and keep my air to the rear and await the Allied rebuttal.









Part 12: Perfidious Albion @: http://boardgamegeek.com/article/12906590
27 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Patrick Bauer
United States
Reading
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Waste Water too
badge
Mid-Atlantic Air Museum
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Now a brief interlude:
One of Vassal by email’s greatest strengths is its greatest weakness: the long gaps between files, especially with games that require a lot of back and forth between players during a turn. The more players you add the longer the game can get…exponentially.

We filled the gaps of this game with little bits of fiction, mostly about our intelligence attempts and gaffes. On the Allied side Bond, Clouseau and Sonya; the Axis had Bella from Italy and since I felt slighted a pair of Germans Hans and Fritz, young radio operators pressed into the intelligence service. These bits of fiction were usually brief, sometimes funny. But Plan Audacious II stirred a great story in me (well “great” only in the sense of my capabilities). Here is the fiction before and after Audacious II:

Bella had assumed the role of a fleeing French socialite in advance of the Italian invasion. She was quite concerned with the large numbers of well armed French regular forces lying in wait behind the young boys on the front lines. But she soon found herself amongst the well bred elite of Lyon. They were in quite a stir over the recent arrival of German armor units in their fair city. And while quite proud with the speed and efficiency with which the Allies had dispatched the threat, they were worried at France's economic position. See being wealthy, war while important always takes a back seat to the overall economic future. The three months of German occupation had damaged the local economy and caused a recession throughout France. Everyone was confident that Spring would see a French recovery. Bella relayed the economic news through her new German channels to her Teutonic counterparts.

Hans' desk was a clutter of more depressing news and stubborn general staff plans. It seemed Berlin was very worried that the timetable for some operation only named B would be ruined by France's survival into 1941. So much so that the new field orders were desperately bold -- a daring plan that seeks to quash the French position and take advantage of its reported economic peril. But so much relied on so few. Intelligence would be key. In truth the most overt form of spying was called for: sabotage. Hans sent the first order he ever sent to Fritz; he hoped it wouldn't be his last.

Fritz had always loved trains, and he had just gotten off of one at a station on the edge of Freiburg. He was hoping for a mission into Switzerland; after just barely escaping France he needed a break. A car was waiting and he was driven promptly to a ragtag little air field and hustled into a hanger. Now Fritz had never once been to an airport and was gaping like a schoolboy at all the sleek grey aircraft. He noticed elements of two combat air wings landing and returning from battle. Then he realized he was being escorted to a hanger full of soldiers. An officer handed him a very heavy rucksack with all kinds of straps ... everyone was wearing one ... his heart sank ... a sergeant helped him put on his parachute; over his protestations that he had never even been on a plane. The sergeant paid him no heed, offering him only a curt, "There's nothing for you to do -- we'll strap the hook and push you out, once you land you'll know if we did it right." The men around him laughed, he did not. So he and a small group of troopers boarded a lone rickety 226. His escort handed him orders only to opened when aloft. As the plane took off he read the orders and realized just how desperate his portion of the plan was; and how important.

He burned the orders in his helmet while in flight. When the flight officer bristled at the risk, Franz ordered him to sit down and shut up. The orders had given him command authority and he was too angry to take any more crap. Being a good German, the flight officer obeyed -- suddenly none of the other soldiers were laughing anymore.



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Hans' intelligence was exemplary. The French commander of 10Inf had considered an attack by German forces remote. So much so that he had given leave to nearly the whole corps. Some Italian agent named Bella had relayed to Hans that the French General had decided to winter in Lyon, declaring, "The Germans have not launched a winter offensive since Frederick the Great and they certainly won't be launching one now."

The 10th Corps' Headquarters and main communication facility was placed near a rail yard in Besançon. Fritz and his commandos had a relatively easy landing zone. The yard was deserted and the commandos took quick action against the two old men guarding the gate. It was really sort of sad. They were looking outward by small tin with some broken boards aflame for heat. Fritz led his men directly into the communications building through the truck dock doors that Bella had suggested. The crew there died in their sleep, unaware of the hands that thrust the knives. Four of the commandos were fluent in French, they quickly shed their uniforms and unpacked crisp French ones from the group bag. The bodies were stowed and Fritz led the rest of the commandos on their secondary mission -- the newly promoted French signal corps would work its magic on the 10th alone.

Once again Fritz was struck by the surreal nature of combat. The commando assault on the corps' headquarters was swift, violent and somehow slow to the mind's eye. The commandos were brutally adept at the short bursts needed from their weapons. Fritz hardly had to shoot but did several times when French officers appeared from somewhat surprising spaces. They had wiped out everyone in the building just as the general alarms had sounded. Like wolves on the hunt, Fritz led his men back to the rail yard where they recovered the explosives they had brought for their retreat. They sabotaged most of the railhead in such short order that they were able to enter a packed area of passenger cars unnoticed. There they waited.

Dawn seemed to take forever to come but the sky filled with troopers soon enough. The battle was fierce, but the French clad commandos in the communication center did yeomen's work delivering false information and firing coordinates. Later Hans would discover that the German general staff estimated more French soldiers died that day of fratricide than of direct contact with the Germans. As a colonel of the German 8th armor arrived at the yard, Fritz led his men out and quickly informed him of the communications sting operation. The colonel actually let out a whoop of delight. He said two whole corps of Germany's finest armor was now racing to avenge the loss at Melun. All that stood in the way was an undersized French corps.

The next day, Fritz led his commando unit back to Saarbrücken in trio of kubelwagons commandeered from a rather fat and officious motor pool clerk. Fritz led the men to the 1st Armored Corps HQ victorious. He and his men had won the war. They had taken him in like a brother and were quite glowing with their praise of his work. He was going to return the favor by averring their merits to the general staff. He walked into the main office and his heart sank....

He knew immediately something was terribly, terribly wrong. The reports were crushing, stunning and utterly unbelievable. The French 2GCM had circled behind the Germans at Melun again. And again, Paris stood defiant.

13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Appleton
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Back in the old 1d6 days of World in Flames a friend of mine had a joke about a die which he called "the device which rolls sixes". He only brought it out on S/O '41 weather turn die rolls and when he was attacking Gibraltar. You need just such a device.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Doug Poskitt
Portugal
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
France still alive and kicking in the 1941 YSS ... Stalin extended his holiday on the Black Sea, Molotov took time out to receive his grandchildren and gave them an in-depth tour of the Kremlin.

M Daladier could hardly believe his luck ... he should do well at the next elections! There was the expense of building more PoW camps to accommodate yet more Panzer Corps Commanders and their crew, but that was a small matter.

As for Churchill, he lived in his bath and those close to him wondered if his cigar could possibly get any bigger ... "Never in the field of human conflict have so many wasted so much for so little" was his comment on Plan Audacious I & II.

At this stage of the war, Pat seemed to be digging his hole ever deeper, and the chances of him knocking out any major power but the French looked rather dim.

An 83% 1:1 is one thing, but a straight 50% 1:1 began to smack of desperation. After the latest German disaster, as the Allied player I began to start thinking about how the rest of the war might play out and what Britain's position should be for 1941 through to when the USA entered in 1942.

France had proved a splendid irritant to the grand strategic plans of the mad Corporal, but was it a good idea for her to stand through 1941? Given his losses to date, I considered it most unlikely Pat would commit Germany to a two-front war. All the while France stood, the Red Army were lined up along the Nazi-Soviet Pact line, far too near Berlin for comfort.

Some hard decisions were called for in the 1941 campaign season ...
devil



7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave Durrell
United States
Maine
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Terrific Game reports Patrick, thank you!

I can certainly commiserate with your position, and appreciate your sense of futility given the position of the Reich in one of the games I am playing, in which the military mite to the south also must render economic aid to Germany.

Oh, and I believe Doug is the Webmaster at PBE dieroller. whistle

Regards,

the leader
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Doug Poskitt
Portugal
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Classic gamer wrote:
Oh, and I believe Doug is the Webmaster at PBE dieroller. whistle

Regards,

the leader


Damn! My cover is blown!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave Durrell
United States
Maine
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Jut kidding Doug.... I think?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nathaniel GOUSSET
France
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
And that is why I love the Europa CRT and exchange rules so much... In a Europa game the exchange would have left you with one Panzer unit in Paris.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
fangotango
Canada
Halifax
Nova Scotia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
IKerensky wrote:
And that is why I love the Europa CRT and exchange rules so much... In a Europa game the exchange would have left you with one Panzer unit in Paris.


And Third Reich has big and small exchanges. A small exchange, also a distinct possibility at 1:1 odds, would have left German units to enter Paris. The big exchange, in this case, did not. If the Germans had been able to muster two air factors of ground support, then even the big exchange would have left a panzer unit.

But if Pat had had those two extra factors, I am sure the die would have come up slightly differently. A special circumstantial +1 DRM would have kicked in.....
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Doug Poskitt
Portugal
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
One thing I can say at this point ... the Gods of War were not finished meddling in this game yet, not by a long way!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
fangotango
Canada
Halifax
Nova Scotia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have a feeling this AAR was not started, two years after the fact, in order to report on a short-lived game.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Doug Poskitt
Portugal
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quite right sir.

In actual fact, it only finished a few days before Pat started posting his AAR.

Quite apart from Pat's wonderful presentation, the game itself proved to have many a twist and turn and was one of the most engrossing I have ever played.

I shall always remember this game and the spirit in which it was played.

In fact, now that it's over, something is missing ...
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Timothy B.
United States
Missouri
flag msg tools
dougposkitt wrote:
Quite right sir.

In actual fact, it only finished a few days before Pat started posting his AAR.

Quite apart from Pat's wonderful presentation, the game itself proved to have many a twist and turn and was one of the most engrossing I have ever played.

I shall always remember this game and the spirit in which it was played.

In fact, now that it's over, something is missing ...


Wife and kids? (Hey... when did they move out...?)
laugh
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.