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Subject: Even more pleased... rss

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Keith Anderson
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A couple of things have happened over the last week or so that have made me even more pleased with buying into this game.

First, they showed an example of the improved paint scheme on kickstarter. Wow!

Second, I watched the Chief's video review on this site and this just sunk in...I had underestimated the differences in the ship cards. In prior reviews I focused on the mechanics of the game. In Chief's review, he discussed the differences in two ships and this really brought the system home to me.

For maneuvering each ship card has a color coded border that determines maneuvering possibilities based on which color the wind crosses. Okay, I knew that, but it just sunk in how different the ships can be in that color coding. For example, the red areas that show that the ship is going into the wind are considerably different between the ships Chief used as examples. In the other games of this type that I have played, all the ships usually use the same 30 degree or 60 degree angles to determine their attitude to the wind. Their differences are then limited to how differently they handle within each of these attitudes. In Sails of Glory though, the different ships also use different angles to determine whether they are running, reaching, etc. This can make a huge difference between ships. For instance, even if two ships use the same maneuver deck, one might be able to sail closer to the wind or it might have a wider range of courses where it can make best speed.

As for firing, Chief put two ship cards side by side so that it was clear how different the broadside angles can be between ships. It might then be possible that even if two ships are sailing parallel with one somewhat ahead, one might hit with full broadside while the other hits with a half broadside. In most other games these would be the same.

I don't know just how much the ships will vary in these original ships but I do really appreciate the flexibility the design allows for. The differences between frigates and SoL are easy to see. There are also some differences between the current frigates of the 2 sides. From online pics the SoL between the 2 sides also look at least slightly different.

Anyway, I realize I've been somewhat slow on 'getting' this but its a nice, late surprise.
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J. Emmett
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GamePlayer wrote:
For maneuvering each ship card has a color coded border that determines maneuvering possibilities based on which color the wind crosses. Okay, I knew that, but it just sunk in how different the ships can be in that color coding. For example, the red areas that show that the ship is going into the wind are considerably different between the ships Chief used as examples. In the other games of this type that I have played, all the ships usually use the same 30 degree or 60 degree angles to determine their attitude to the wind. Their differences are then limited to how differently they handle within each of these attitudes. In Sails of Glory though, the different ships also use different angles to determine whether they are running, reaching, etc. This can make a huge difference between ships. For instance, even if two ships use the same maneuver deck, one might be able to sail closer to the wind or it might have a wider range of courses where it can make best speed.

I've never played a naval warfare game before, let alone knew nothing about the era, but the card-based movement is so elegant in Wings of Glory that I knew Sails was a must-buy. Then these video demos have been showing just how frighteningly elegant SoG is—with just a few simple lines on each base, it seems to have just out-eleganted WoG, smuggling in all kinds of tactical differences between ships with absolutely no fuss.

I've been reading what I can about the Age of Sail since I backed the Kickstarter (gotta do my homework), and now I'm hooked and can't wait to play the game and see the simulation. Knowing what I've learned about what it was like sailing battleships, SoG looks like the ideal system. I feel sorry for any game that has tables!
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Bart Brunscheen
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Thanks KA. This looks to be the best sailing war game I've ever played. Now i just need the none prototype and the advanced rules before i know for sure. You're spot on with the subtleties. I even wondered if at some point they couldn't make different range markers. If I recall some ships had guns that could shoot further, or were more accurate. That would add even more wrinkles into the game with no added complexity.

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Mayor Jim
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armed-medic wrote:
Thanks KA. This looks to be the best sailing war game I've ever played. Now i just need the none prototype and the advanced rules before i know for sure. You're spot on with the subtleties. I even wondered if at some point they couldn't make different range markers. If I recall some ships had guns that could shoot further, or were more accurate. That would add even more wrinkles into the game with no added complexity.



Range would add a little extra complexity...but I certainly would welcome it. Great idea...
 
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armed-medic wrote:
If I recall some ships had guns that could shoot further, or were more accurate. That would add even more wrinkles into the game with no added complexity.


    Look up Rear Admiral Philip Broke, best known for his capture of the USS Chesapeake in 1813. This was a battle that changed the British Navy.

    The Chesapeake was a bit bigger with bigger guns and yes, it had greater range because of it and more punch when it landed a hit. In theory the American ship should prevail as had its sisters in most battles with the British, as American ships generally showed up with bigger guns. But Broke came up through the ranks as a gunnery officer and it was his opinion that heavy gunnery practice would make a significant difference in battle, and in this case it certainly did. The Chesapeake was boarded within fifteen minutes after opening volleys. Her Captain, James "Don't give up the ship!" Lawrence gave up the ghost shortly after the battle, his ship having received 362 hits in six minutes.

    Broke wasn't the most popular guy in Bristol. He had a bit of a chip on his shoulder because no one would listen to him, and ran his ship differently from other captains. But when you drag home a bigger ship, with bigger guns and more of them you tend to catch people's attention. The British Admiralty debriefed him and came to the realization that constant training paid off. The Chesapeake was repaired, reflagged, and served the British out of Halifax for most of the rest of the war.

             S.


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Andrea Angiolino
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Better and heavier guns have better poi ts in the game, inflicting more damage. Better aim is a special skill in the Captain & Crew Skills expansion. Longer range is not in the game... Yet.
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