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Subject: CBS / Time Warner rss

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Shawn Fox
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So I've always hated cable because there is hardly anything on TV worth watching and they force me to buy 200 crap channels just so I can watch a few sports programs and comedy central. I finally cancelled cable completely a few months back, but that isn't the point of this post...

Anyway, I think most of the problem is actually due to the way that the TV providers force 15 channels down the cable companies' throats, with Disney (owner of ESPN) being the most egregious of the bunch. That isn't to say that even outside of that the cable companies aren't ripping us off (expensive internet for example), just that they are probably only 25% responsible.

The point of all this being, Time Warner just told CBS that they would be happy to offer CBS as an a la carte channel, which to me is what I'd love to see happen with every channel. Yes it will cause a lot of channels to disappear, but I don't see that as a problem at all. Most channels are crap anyway, and they just eat up the limited bandwidth on cable (forcing higher compression rates with the resulting artifacts during rapid motion). CBS will never accept of course, but I think it is a great move by Time Warner to show that it isn't their fault that cable bills are so ridiculously expensive.
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Scott Daniel
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That's a great deal for Time Warner, CBS is the #1 network and brings lots of traffic. This will be an interesting battle to watch, I agree there's a lot of crappy channels, but CBS isn't one of them. The distribution vs. content provider battles are about to begin in earnest.
 
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Chad
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The really interesting thing to watch is the rise of alternative content creators (aka Netflix) combined with Internet Providers circumventing the traditional creators/networks/cable.

It would not stun me if in 10 years, the entertainment market is radically different.
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Scott Daniel
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Utrecht wrote:
The really interesting thing to watch is the rise of alternative content creators (aka Netflix) combined with Internet Providers circumventing the traditional creators/networks/cable.

It would not stun me if in 10 years, the entertainment market is radically different.


I agree, we could see some radical changes coming. My gut is that power will swing to the content creators, not the distributors.
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Orange is the New Black and House of Cards was really good, and I like the whole season at a time model.

CBS is just "alright". We do watch Elementary, Good Wife and Under the Dome, and Monday night Football. But we really don't need to have it on cable, so I can save $20 on my bill and hook up the HDTV antennae to get CBS.
 
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Born To Lose, Live To Win
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I dumped cable/sat a few months ago and I'm actually going to build myself an HD antenna this evening since the football season is about to ramp up.

Take that "Big Antenna"!

http://www.tvantennaplans.com
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Paul W
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Honestly, sports is the last good card that cable companies are holding, and I think it's only a matter of time before leagues start offering direct-streaming options for their games. Lots of young folks are cutting the cord, and I think cable companies are going to have a very hard time trying to woo them back.
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I still have Dish but mostly because the DVR service is great.
 
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Eric "Shippy McShipperson" Mowrer
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fizzmore wrote:
Honestly, sports is the last good card that cable companies are holding, and I think it's only a matter of time before leagues start offering direct-streaming options for their games. Lots of young folks are cutting the cord, and I think cable companies are going to have a very hard time trying to woo them back.


If they are smart, they won't try to woo them back over the long term, but rather embrace the future that is digital download and streaming services. The networks and operators that can't adapt will die and be replaced by ones that can.
 
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Chad
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Formersd wrote:
Utrecht wrote:
The really interesting thing to watch is the rise of alternative content creators (aka Netflix) combined with Internet Providers circumventing the traditional creators/networks/cable.

It would not stun me if in 10 years, the entertainment market is radically different.


I agree, we could see some radical changes coming. My gut is that power will swing to the content creators, not the distributors.


Absolutely - Distributors are fucked. If you are not creating content, there is no place for you in the value chain.

The ONLY glitch in this is that mobile companies are going to start throttling data consumption - and until 5G roles around, there may be situations where a land line/cable provider can satisfy that bandwidth gap. But 5G and 6G will ultimately minimize that (granted, HD movies still will stretch things)
 
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fizzmore wrote:
Honestly, sports is the last good card that cable companies are holding, and I think it's only a matter of time before leagues start offering direct-streaming options for their games. Lots of young folks are cutting the cord, and I think cable companies are going to have a very hard time trying to woo them back.


This is the future. The best I've seen so far is MotoGp's season pass. For just over $100 per year you get an amazing array of HD programming that includes multiple cams on multiple motorcycles, all the qualifying and practices, all 18 GP events featuring all the classes of races and unlimited access to the video library which has a mind-numbing quantity of video and races dating back decades.

Less than $10 a month.
 
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Born To Lose, Live To Win
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fizzmore wrote:
Honestly, sports is the last good card that cable companies are holding, and I think it's only a matter of time before leagues start offering direct-streaming options for their games. Lots of young folks are cutting the cord, and I think cable companies are going to have a very hard time trying to woo them back.


Lucrative contracts with local network affiliates is what is holding them back I think. As it is now, the NFL only streams "replays". The live broadcasts are already contracted away. If they streamed it would have to be in cooperation with the local TV stations. Not impossible, but complicated.
 
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Chad
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TheChin! wrote:
fizzmore wrote:
Honestly, sports is the last good card that cable companies are holding, and I think it's only a matter of time before leagues start offering direct-streaming options for their games. Lots of young folks are cutting the cord, and I think cable companies are going to have a very hard time trying to woo them back.


Lucrative contracts with local network affiliates is what is holding them back I think. As it is now, the NFL only streams "replays". The live broadcasts are already contracted away. If they streamed it would have to be in cooperation with the local TV stations. Not impossible, but complicated.


what will start to happen is that the NFL will start to negotiate directly for advertising as part of their stream.

Oh, I forgot - the other potential glitch is the Internet Providers - they are going to want a piece of the value pie streaming along their pipes - that will be an interesting one to watch (by this time, CBS/NBC/ABC/Fox will be almost exclusively in the content business)
 
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Richard Hefferan
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Why are people laboring under the delusion that ala carte television will create a reduction in prices for the consumer? Where you pay $80 per month now for 150 channels you'll soon pay $78 for the 6 channels you care about. They're not going to take a huge cut in profits simply because people would like them to and the business model is changing. Their pricing scheme will change right with it and we'll just get less for the same money. Hooray.
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Utrecht wrote:
The really interesting thing to watch is the rise of alternative content creators (aka Netflix) combined with Internet Providers circumventing the traditional creators/networks/cable.

It would not stun me if in 10 years, the entertainment market is radically different.


It's already radically different than 10 years ago.

The thing is there are two forces at work here. The studios and networks who have something that has been working for them for decades and aren't really excited about what change might do to them. The second is the change itself or specifically the people creating new ways to bring entertainment into people's homes. So you have this tug-a-war between the two. The one is racing into the future and the other is dragging it's feet wanting to take a slow and steady approach. In the end money will decide how fast we advance. Specifically our money. The faster we accept the changes the faster they will happen and the studios will have to keep up.

My wife and I will soon have Google Fiber. When that happens how we watch TV will forever change. Forget about DVDs, HBO and that stuff. Our Internet and TV will literally be merged together. Beats the days when our only choices if we wanted to watch TV were whatever was on the big three networks, PBS and a UHF station that played old movies and reruns.
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