Andrew H
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10/4/13 Edit-I just changed the title, to call this contest ready.

This is a pretty quick dice game, based on the game Cribbage. I'm calling it Cubbage (cube bage), but might change the spelling a lititle. You need 13 dice (6 of one color, 6 of another, and 1 final die which should be different if possible), and something to keep score. A Cribbage board works best, but pencil and paper can be used too.

For those that know Cribbage, there are many similarities, but it isn't the same game. Scores each round seem to be higher, and the player has an advantage over the invisible opponent. You will probably want to track how much you win by, and start you opponent several points ahead. Also note that the numbers are different from Cribbage, and you might catch yourself saying the wrong thing.

The goal of the game, is to score 121 point before your opponent does. Points are scored three ways with each roll of the dice: the "play", the "hand," and the "crib." Dice score points several ways, and score points for each way they qualify. Here's how they score:

Each set that totals 7 - 2 points
Pair - 2 points
Three of a kind - 6 points
Four ot a kind - 12 points
Five of a kind - 20 points
Six of a kind (play) - 30 points
Seven of a kind (play) -42 points
Eight of a kind (play) -56 points
Three in a row (run) - 3 points
Four in a row (run) - 4 points
Five in a row (run) - 5 points
Last die ("Go") (play) - 1 point
Exactly fifteen (play) - 2 points

Note that four in a row only scores four points, it is not two "three in a row" and one four in a row. However the dice might also score points for totaling seven. For example, a "hand" 2, 3, 3, 4, 4 has four ways to total seven (8 points) four separate ways to make three in a row (12 points) and two pairs (4 points), for a total of 24 points. The strategy will be familiar to Cribbage players.

The game is played by alternating turns when the player and their opponent has a crib. When a player has a crib, the opponent plays the first die in the "play," and scores their points first in the hand. When the opponent has the crib, the player leads and scores first. Randomly decide who gets the first crib.

First, the player rolls all six of their dice. They will choose four for their hand, and two for a crib. The choice will differ based upon whos turn for the crib, and what they think will score the most points. The player pushes the two crib dice to a side to be scored later (alternate sides of the score board when it's the opponents crib).

Next, the player without the crib leads in the "play." If it is the player's turn to lead, choose a die and push it forward. If it's the opponent's turn, roll one of their dice. Next the other player plays a die, notes the total, and scores any points based upon the chart above. The lead player then plays another die. Keep all dice used in the play face up. They will be used again to score later.

Example 1. The player leads with a 3, and then rolls a 4 for the opponent. The total is seven, and the opponent scores two points.
Example 2. The opponent rolls a 2, and the player plays their own 2. The total is now four, and the player scores two point. If the opponent rolls a 2 or a 3, the opponent would score six points (three of a kind) or two points (total of seven) respectively.
Example 3. The player leads with a 3, and rolls a 4 for the opponent (total of seven, scores 2 points for the opponent). The player follows with a 5 (total of twelve), and scores three points.

The play alternates until the total gets as close as possible to a total of fifteen, without going over. If a die can be played, it must be player. Whoever played the last die scores one point (called a "Go"), if the die brought the total to exactly fifteen, they score two points. The Play then starts over with a total of zero, and the lead begins with the player who didn't score the Go.

When rolling for the opponent near a total of fifteen, roll the die first to see if it can be played, if it cannot, it will be the lead at the start of the next play. Note, when rolling for the opponent, the player will have an advantage by knowing what the opponent will lead.

Example 1. The total is at twelve, and the opponent rolls a 4, and all of the player's dice are also 4s or higher. The opponent cannot play, nor can the player. The player scores one point and the opponent leads the 4 in the next play.
Example 2. The total is 13, and the player's dice are too high. They roll a 1 for the opponent (total fourteen), and then roll another 1. The opponent score four points (two for a pair, plus two for exactly fifteen). The player leads the next play.

The Play continues unit the player has used all four of their dice, and has rolled four dice for the opponent. Score the last points for the last die (plus any other pairs, sevens, or runs, etc.). Then move on to the "hand."

Roll another (third color) die. This will be used by both the player and the opponent for scoring. The player without the crib scores first, using their four dice from the play above plus the die just rolled. Next, the player with the crib scores with their five (four from the play plus the same fifth die). Finally, the fifth die gets passed to score with the crib dice.

Example 1. The player has a 1, 2, 2, 4 and rolled a 5 on the extra die. They score ten point and pass the 5 to the opponents hand. The opponent rolled a 1, 3, 5, 5 and scores six points with the 5.

Finally, roll the last two opponent's dice, and score all points in the crib (these two dice, the fifth die from the "Hand," and the two player dice set aside at the start of his round).

After the crib points are scored, the turn alternates to the other player. The player rolls their six dice and pushes two to the appropriate crib. The game continues with the play, hand and crib scoring until one player reaches 121 points or higher.
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Lizzie
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Re: WIP-Cubbage-A dice game for the 2013 Solitaire Design Contest-Playtesting Phase
I've only had time for a quick glance, but this looks brilliant (I'm a cribbage fan and I love dice) I will give it a go later.
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Andrew H
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Re: WIP-Cubbage-A dice game for the 2013 Solitaire Design Contest-Playtesting Phase
HuggableHamster wrote:
I've only had time for a quick glance, but this looks brilliant (I'm a cribbage fan and I love dice) I will give it a go later.

Thank you. My son and I are Cribbage fans too, and the inspiration hit when we were playing with cards and I had dice from another prototype near. I think it's easier for him, because he hasn't developed the Cribbage habbits that I have. When I count the "sets adding to seven," I often say "fifteen-two, fifteen-four, fif...seven-two, seven-four, etc." A word of warning that you may do the same. If you do, find a seven-year-old, they find it hilarious.
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Andrew H
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Re: WIP-Cubbage-A dice game for the 2013 Solitaire Design Contest-Playtesting Phase
I realized I did the math wrong for the five of a kind and up. I corrected the original post with what should be right. This is a rare event, but not as rare as my original math.
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Nate K
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Re: WIP-Cubbage-A dice game for the 2013 Solitaire Design Contest-Playtesting Phase
5, 6, 7, and 8 of a kind? Yeah, that's a bit different than cribbage....

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Nate K
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Re: WIP-Cubbage-A dice game for the 2013 Solitaire Design Contest-Playtesting Phase
I'm not sure I fully understand the "pegging" part of the game. Part of that might be because I can't tell if the game is for solitaire or two players?
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Andrew H
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Re: WIP-Cubbage-A dice game for the 2013 Solitaire Design Contest-Playtesting Phase
kurthl33t wrote:
I'm not sure I fully understand the "pegging" part of the game. Part of that might be because I can't tell if the game is for solitaire or two players?

It can be played by two players, but I'm trying to write the rules for solo play. When you play alone, you roll one die at a time for each of the opponent's play. Set each aside to score the hand later.

The random rolls are not as strong as a human opponent, but because of the smaller "deck" of six, they actually pair and get runs a lot. The last few times I've played, I've started the opponent at twenty points, and games have been close.

I've never had more then four of a kind when testing, but realized it is possible (the player has four ones, and rolls a one each time for the opponent's cards). I think the odds are one in six to the eighth power, so I'll be buying a lottery ticket if I see it happen.
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Andrew H
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A request to add this to the database has been submitted, so I'll call it contest ready.
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Jake Staines
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I'm a bit confused as to how the scoring for this game works. Am I right in thinking that:

Player rolls two ones and two twos.

Player leads with a 1, scores 0 points for a total of 0
Opponent rolls a 2, scores 0 points for a total of 0
Player plays a 2, scores 2 points (for the pair) for a total of 2
Opponent rolls a 1, scores 4 points (for a pair of 2s and a pair of 1s) for a total of 4
Player plays a 2, scores 12 points (for a pair of 1s, three of a kind of 2s, plus two ways to make 7) for a total of 14 (12 plus his previous 2)
Opponent rolls a 1, scores 18 points (two three-of-a-kinds, plus three ways to make 7) for a total of 22 (18 plus his previous 4)

?

Assuming that I'm getting it right, it seems that the scores at each step are more or less meaningless, the only thing that matters is who gets the last score - because each player's score will be at least as much as the opponent's last score plus any extra they manage to add. It seems like a pretty overly-complex way to score when it could more or less be simplified down to "whoever plays the dice that brings the total to or above 15 wins the round and scores whatever new pairs/triplets/etc. he has brought into existence with that last play".

(The only reason it seems that it can't be simplified down to that is the first-to-121 victory condition - presumably that can be reached right in the middle of a round, rather than just at the end of one?)

Maybe it makes more sense to Cribbage players, but I just found it confusing and I didn't really understand what I was doing at any point. I hope I am missing something!
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Andrew H
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Bichatse wrote:
I'm a bit confused as to how the scoring for this game works. Am I right in thinking that:

Player rolls two ones and two twos.

Player leads with a 1, scores 0 points for a total of 0
Opponent rolls a 2, scores 0 points for a total of 0
Player plays a 2, scores 2 points (for the pair) for a total of 2
Opponent rolls a 1, scores 4 points (for a pair of 2s and a pair of 1s) for a total of 4
Player plays a 2, scores 12 points (for a pair of 1s, three of a kind of 2s, plus two ways to make 7) for a total of 14 (12 plus his previous 2)
Opponent rolls a 1, scores 18 points (two three-of-a-kinds, plus three ways to make 7) for a total of 22 (18 plus his previous 4)

?

Assuming that I'm getting it right, it seems that the scores at each step are more or less meaningless, the only thing that matters is who gets the last score - because each player's score will be at least as much as the opponent's last score plus any extra they manage to add. It seems like a pretty overly-complex way to score when it could more or less be simplified down to "whoever plays the dice that brings the total to or above 15 wins the round and scores whatever new pairs/triplets/etc. he has brought into existence with that last play".

(The only reason it seems that it can't be simplified down to that is the first-to-121 victory condition - presumably that can be reached right in the middle of a round, rather than just at the end of one?)

Maybe it makes more sense to Cribbage players, but I just found it confusing and I didn't really understand what I was doing at any point. I hope I am missing something!

It's a little different with the pairs. If a player immediately pairs the die played before, they get the points. This can then be countered with another pair (which would score 6 points), but if another die is played, it breaks up that pairing.

In a normal card game version of Cribbage, each of these three scoring times (play, hand, crib) can get between 0 and 29 points, with less than 10 on each being pretty common. This game can score higher than that, but it's not that common. In my tests, the game typically lasts 4-5 rounds, where you both lead and follow.

With the dice you listed, there would only be 2 points scored, for when the player played the 2 after the opponent rolled it (the third line).

However, after the play is done, each player gets to score their hand. With those dice, the player would have at least 2 points (for the pair of 2s) and the opponent would have at least 2 points (for the pair of 1s).
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Julian Anstey
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Another Cribbage fan here. I've played this twice and will definitely play it some more because I enjoyed it. I will say that I would rather play it 2 player, but it's interesting how competitive the AI player can be due to the values only ranging from 1 to 6. Like you say, scoring in play with pairs, runs or 7/15 is quite common. Also, a big scoring hand like 2,3,3,4,4 is way more likely than in Cribbage. I, er, lost my 2nd game shake (of course giving the AI player a 20 point headstart, and only due to timing of the scoring). I won the first handily though.

The only irritation is leading in play when knowing what AI will be playing next due to a "near 15" situation. I suppose that's not going to happen often. It happened once to me and gave me a pair which AI would otherwise have scored. I kind of felt as if I were half-cheating taking advantage of that information.
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Jake Staines
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fur94 wrote:

It's a little different with the pairs. If a player immediately pairs the die played before, they get the points. This can then be countered with another pair (which would score 6 points), but if another die is played, it breaks up that pairing.

Aha! Thanks for clearing that up, it makes much more sense now. I'll have to give it another go!
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