Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
29 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Recommendations

Subject: Miniature game suggestion. rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Scott
United States
denver
Colorado
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
After doing a little cruising around the site, I've decided that in order to balance my collection I should look into a miniatures game. I don't mean collectible minis (I already have some). I'm talking about the hardcore upainted GW type games.

However, I have two concerns:

1. It will be too expensive.
2. The rulesets are so complicated that no one will want to play.

So, that being said, are there any minis games that are cheap and a little simpler than most? Or am I making assumptions about the complexity and cost of miniatures gaming?

Thanks for any help you can offer!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Leo Tischer
United States
Parma
Ohio
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just a suggestion ...

A good cross between board games & miniatures are the Command & Colors games by Richard Borg. Take a look at Battle Cry and Memoir 44 (Civil War & WWII respectively). They use plastic miniatures, dice, a card system, and a hex board with terrain tiles. If you like these games and then want to go further, you could then check out the various miniatures rules & figures.

The nice thing about the C&C games is that they are entirely self-contained (not collectable nor requiring any additional figure purchases), and scenarios can be set up and played in about an hour. They are also very easy to learn and fun to play.

There's a new game also, C&C: Ancients. This one doesn't use miniatures, however; it uses wooden blocks with stickers that show the different unit types.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rob "Bodhi" Wolff
United States
Vancouver
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Miniatures games come in two parts - the rules, and the miniatures.

The Rules
A good starting benchmark is to recognize that, amongst miniatures games, the Games Workshop Warhammer Fantasy / Warhammer 40k systems are like Microsoft -- not respected, not great systems, but so common that it is probably not the worst idea to just go ahead and use 'em!

If you go with a commercial rules system, they often have a miniatures lineup that goes alongside it, and those "official" miniatures can be quite expensive. Games Workshop is notorious for having the most expensive starting cost, upkeep, and maintenance (especially if you keep trying to upgrade your army to keep up with their expansions, erratta, and new "flavour of the month" style changes).

Indeed, you can even find older, not-much-used commercial rules online for free. Games Workshop does this at http://www.specialist-games.com/

However, you can find free, public domain wargames rules online at a lot of different places. You don't have to use the Warhammer system. There are over a hundred different free rules systems available here at http://www.freewargamesrules.co.uk/

The Figures
You can find cheap miniatures if you're willing to play non-fantasy or non-sci-fi stuff. Plastic Historical miniatures are extremely inexpensive.

Even for your "standard" fantasy/sci-fi miniatures, you can find inexpensive replacements. Reaper miniatures sells some nice stuff, at a reasonable price.

And don't forget to scour the bargain bins and online sales. You can find miniatures at an incredible discount.

////////////

Scale:
There are two general types of games - Army scale and Skirmish scale. Some games demand that you field dozens and dozens, or even hundreds, of figures in order to battle your opponent. Skirmish-level games, on the other hand, usually only require about 10 figures.

For simplicity, speed-of-play, and starting cost, you can't beat a nice skirmish-level game.

//////////////

Suggestions:

Our group used to play "Mordheim", the skirmish-level Warhammer Fantasy game. You only need a few figures to start with, the rules are ridiculously easy, and the rules are now free! We used some "official" Games Workshop miniatures, but we also threw in other generic replacement figures when we couldn't find something cheap enough. The thing that Mordheim has going for it is that it is easy to get into, relatively speedy to play, it is a good introduction to the Warhammer rules system, and the rules are free. We enjoy campaign-style games like this, where your warband gains experience after each battle, searches for loot, goes up in level, etc.

Now we play "Confrontation", the skirmish-level fantasy game by Rackham miniatures. The rules are very slick and broad, and while I don't think they're particularly complicated they are *definitely* a step up in complexity from the Warhammer-style games. The major downside is that the statistics for each figure come on cards that are packaged with the figure themselves, as do the statistics for spells, magic items, special artifacts, etc. Frankly, this can be a teeny bit addictive, as you find yourself wanting to get such-and-such a figure, in order to get access to his or her nifty new spell. Thus, you are all but forced to play with "official" figures, in order to get the stats, and the individual miniatures can be a bit more expensive than you'd expect. However, you *can* purchase the stat cards separately, and use other generic replacement figures.

However, my wife loves their figures and sculpts, and this is the one game where she doesn't seem to mind picking up new miniatures. She loves these guys, and thinks they are completely worth the cost!

Confrontation's new campaign-style, experience-based system "Dogs of War" is coming out in April, and will require even fewer figures to start with. A 20 dollar boxed set of grunts will probably get you started. This might be something to take a look at, to get started.

////////

If you and your friends are completely new, and not rules savvy types, you might want to try Mordheim to start. If, however, you aren't afraid of a teeny bit of reading, check out the new 3rd edition rules for Confrontation, and the upcoming campaign rules for "Dogs of War" (there is a short quick-start .pdf available online, if you want to peruse it)

////////

Good luck with your gaming.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bobb Beauchamp
United States
Volo
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There's no such thing as a true minis game that's cheap. Almost by definition, the minis are going to drive price up.

Having said that, Heroscape (which I don't own, play, or even know the rules for) is an affodable, complete minis game that you can get for under $40. It's fairly rules light, but that often translates into lack of depth that leads to replayability. Of course, like all minis games, there are expansions, but the base game should come with an adequate variety of minis that you'll be able to play several times before you start feeling like you've exhausted all the team combinations.

Battleground: Fantasy Warfare is a minis game without the minis. It comes in non-random decks for about $15 each, and each dech has enough cards to (barely) make 2 forces. Ideally, you'll need at least 2 decks, giving you 2 complete forces and a full game that you can play many, many times before reaching a stale point. It's got all the hallmarks of a table-top fantasy minis game, essentially being so close to Warhammer Fantasy Battle that most WFB players could open a pack of Battleground cards and start playing in 5 minutes. If the thing you're looking for is a table-top battle game, and the minis are optional, I don't think you can beat Battleground. Reading through the rules may make play seem dauting, but playing a few rounds should show that it's really a matter of becoming familiar, rather than that the rules are hard.

While not technicially a minis game, the Diceland series of games shares a lot of the same traits. Each unit costs a number of points, and each side builds a force to an agreed-upon point limit. It's really simple, though, and cheap.

Along the same lines is FFGs Diskwars series. It's out of print, but you can probably find some clearance bundles at your LGS. It substitutes semi-collectible cardboard flats instead of minis, but otherwise plays like other table-top fantasy minis. More on the simple side, and if you can find it, affordable.

Wizards of the Coast makes both the Star Wars and D&D minis games. Both are on the simple side for rules, but neither are cheap. You'll need to spend over $50, closer to $100, before you have a collection that you'll feel like playing.

There's always the Games Workshop lines, but there are expensive, have a lot of rules, require some assembly and painting to get the full effect of the hobby, and take a ton of room to store and play. Everything you're looking to avoid.

I've saved Doom and Descent for last because I think they're your best bets. Doom is cheaper, and if you don't like the PC game Doom at all, you probably won't like this setting. It's not complex, has minis, and you can get the whole base game for under $50. Plus, there's an expansion, if you do like the game. Descent is more of the same, only with a fantasy setting, and is more favorable to the hero player than Doom is to the Marine player. It's a bit steep at $80 retail, but it comes chock full of minis, 9 decent starting quests, enough heroes to give you tons of incentive to try those 9 quests over and over, a planned expansion later this year, and a free quest editor and player-made quests at FFG's website. Plus it's on the less complex side for rules, although determining what they all are from just the rulebook can be a challenge by itself. arrrh
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott
United States
denver
Colorado
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sorry, I should have mentioned in my original post that I am pretty set on having something that I could paint myself.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Read the rulebook, plan for all contingencies, and…read the rulebook again.
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Plenty of folks have taken to painting their Memoir '44 and Battle Cry sets. (Doom and other "crawly" games, too, for that matter.)
---
If you want a miniatures set that is fairly self-contained (as GW-type rules sets go), is fairly easy to learn, covers a theme that almost everyone can get into, and can use whatever miniatures you can obtain for the theme, I would go with Games Workshop's "Legends of the Old West."

Basically, players form a band of lawmen, desperadoes, or cowboys of about 5-12 characters apiece. You can buy unpainted cowboy figures in either pewter or plastic (which allows you to control your spending) from almost any source you choose. Terrain is also pretty basic an can be obtained or made fairly easily.

What's more, there are other Wild West rules available if you decide to explore other miniatures rules sets further without having to subsequently invest in a new period or line of figs.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Campbell
United States
Excelsior
MN
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
You might want to check out Warmachine.

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/4741



It's a skirmish level miniatures game with a fantasy/steampunk theme.

The minis are gorgeous. There are four factions to choose from: Cygnar, Menoth, Khador and Cryx. They also have a lot of mercenaries.

Because the army lists are smaller, you can get started at a fraction of GW games.

The player base is growing so it shouldn't be a problem finding opponents.

The web site of the publisher is:

www.privateerpress.com

Have a look.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob Roberts

Unspecified
msg tools
Avatar
Dunno what genre you're looking for but for more info than you can probably stand on miniatures go check TMP here: www.theminiaturespage.com

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Glenn Pruitt
United States
waxhaw
North Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
badinfo wrote:
Dunno what genre you're looking for but for more info than you can probably stand on miniatures go check TMP here: www.theminiaturespage.com



I'd second the recommendation that you check out the miniatures page to see what is available. If you find a particular historical (or fantasy) period that interests you, you can post in the relevant forum and get lots of suggestions for appropriate rulesets.

I would heartily recommend that you stay away from plastic figures - sure they are cheap - but if you plan on painting figures then plastic is a waste of time. Plastic simply does not take the paint as well, and does not last as long as a metal miniature. I'm sure some folks would debate this point - ignore them. I've been painting miniatures for about twenty years or so, and I know plastic doesn't last. If on the other hand you put together a nice collection of painted metal figs, you'll have them forever.

I have also found that the best rulesets are created by hobbyists. Beware of the big slick corporate offerings.

So, I think you should start by deciding on a period, then decide on a scale. Next, pick out a ruleset for that period and scale that fits your desired level of complexity, and has a bit of popularity among hobbyists. Lastly, buy your miniatures.

-Glenn

-ps I only wish that TheMinaituresPage was half as nice as BGG!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Heinzmann
United States
Mesa
Arizona
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
$80 gets you into Starship troopers Minis Game. Basic Box set lets you paint and play, and you don't have to deal with Games Workshop.
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/15435
Too bad you didn't post this three weeks ago you could have gotten a GW Warhammer 40k starter for $25 at Barnes and Noble, but it's GW, some people don't like that company.

I don't have Warmachine but it always gets good write ups but the minis are expensive but they are sooo cool looking.

WWII: Flames of war seems to be very popular now, they have nice big minis but a starter 'Company' will run you $200+ then the rule book.

If you like easier rules with a HUGE fan base
DBA/DBM/DBR might also be the way to go. The rules are $12 for DBA and a armies book is $12, and you can play whatever scale you want.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Francisco J. Piña A.
Chile
Calama
Antofagasta
flag msg tools
badge
Insert any witty/stupid overtext you can think of here... I got nothing
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
steamrunner wrote:
If you like easier rules with a HUGE fan base
DBA/DBM/DBR might also be the way to go. The rules are $12 for DBA and a armies book is $12, and you can play whatever scale you want.


I got DBA and DBM, and both are great games, though I prefer DBA over DBM: lighter, quicker and easier to teach, and it also has a "Big Battle" option if you want a game with more than 12 elements on each side. Also, the DBA book comes with all the army lists you'll ever need (4000 BC - 1500 AD aprox). With DBM you have to buy the army lists separately (4 books in total).

Amout scale, it supports almost any scale you can find, with preference for 15-25mm, and it needs very few minis for a complete army (no more than 70-80), my Camillan Roman army is made with 46 minis, including the General stand
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob Roberts

Unspecified
msg tools
Avatar
While I am a big fan of DBA, and have several armies and more that need painting, I will recommend it only with the caveat that it is considered difficult to understand by some folks. The rules are written in a dialect of English known as "Barkerese" after Phil Barker, the rules author.

That being said,once learned its a great game, you only need to buy the rule book, it comes with over 100 army lists. Armies are inexpensive, averaging maybe $25-30. There are lots of folks that play, and tournaments all over the world if you're in to that aspect.

For more on DBA, including a link to DBAOnline which is a great way to get a feel for the game ( its a subscription base online version but you can play several free trial games againts mentor players, and unlimited free hotseat games against yourself) go check out www.fanaticus.org
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Washington
United States
Unspecified
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
Checkallday wrote:
After doing a little cruising around the site, I've decided that in order to balance my collection I should look into a miniatures game. I don't mean collectible minis (I already have some). I'm talking about the hardcore upainted GW type games.

However, I have two concerns:

1. It will be too expensive.
2. The rulesets are so complicated that no one will want to play.

So, that being said, are there any minis games that are cheap and a little simpler than most? Or am I making assumptions about the complexity and cost of miniatures gaming?

Thanks for any help you can offer!


Really surprised that no one's mentioned NECROMUNDA, the squad-level minis game - basic rules are particularly simple for minis games (in part because it's man-to-man combat, and also because there's not as many different factions and sub-factions to the game universe and thus not a lot of special rules for everything), and it's doubtful you'd genuinely need more than a dozen and a half figures at most. Plus, there's a solid optional experience system where your gang gains in attributes and skills as they win more, so campaigns can be very involved affairs.

Also a little surprised that while 3 different people speak of this "DBA" whatever, not one of them nor the site linked to actually bothers to explain wtf that might be...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bobb Beauchamp
United States
Volo
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Checkallday wrote:
Sorry, I should have mentioned in my original post that I am pretty set on having something that I could paint myself.


In that case, I'd suggest a skirmish level game. Although you can paint the minis from Descent/Doom, too.

Mordheim from GW is pretty cheap to get into. It's compaign based and open ended, too, so you can play as often or as little, and see advancement after every game. But you do need to have some good scenery, too, which takes up more storage space.

Warmachine is a really good system, and a starter box is all you need for one side to play. I love the minis, so much that I'd get them to paint even if I didn't play. And in a few months, maybe sooner, the same company is releasing Hordes, a Warmachine compatibable game that uses organic monsters instead of steampunk warjacks.

Maybe it would help if you gave some idea as to what $ level you're willing to invest. From a certain point of view, even the GW games are affordable initial investments. You can get WFB for $80 or so, with 2 armies. Not huge armies, but enough to form 2-4 core units. It's only when you try to collect every army that things start to get Lotto winner only. arrrh
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Glenn Pruitt
United States
waxhaw
North Carolina
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
oldmanrivah wrote:

Also a little surprised that while 3 different people speak of this "DBA" whatever, not one of them nor the site linked to actually bothers to explain wtf that might be...


If you search BGG for "DBA" you'll find this;
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/299

I'm surprised that so many people on this list assume the original poster is interested in a fantasy/sci-fi miniatures game...there is reality you know...

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Barry Kendall
United States
Lebanon
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Before you take the plunge, invest some time in contemplation and in research. You'll be glad you did.

Establish some parameters for your foray into miniatures, such as:

Do you like history-based subjects, or fantasy/science-fiction?

Does hand-to-hand combat, or ranged combat interest you more?

Does mechanization hold a fascination for you? If so, do you think about tanks/armored fighting vehicles, aircraft, or warships?

If you like history, what era? Ancient? Medieval? Musket era? Colonial? Twentieth Century? Modern? If fantasy/s-f, do you like the Tolkien-style realm of multiple races? Do you like, or abhor, "magic" represented in a game? Would you like to re-create something like the "Aliens" situation, or "Starship Troopers," or do you want an entirely fresh world to fight in?

When you think "miniatures," do you envision masses of troops and equipment, or a small group of individuals such as a squad of soldiers, party of knights, or skirmishing frontiersmen?

The last question will also have a bearing on this one: What size figures would you like? Large figures, requiring detailed painting and shading, that will "stand out" on the tabletop and might be individually based? Smaller figures, that can be grouped on bases to look like a whole unit massed in formation?

If you prefer "ranged" combat to hand-to-hand, and/or preferr "massed" armies to skirmish groups, you might want to choose a smaller size figure range--15mm, 12mm, 10mm or even 6 mm. These figures are less costly, man-for-man, than the "large" 25mm, 28mm, 30mm, 40mm or 54mm figures. One benefit of smaller sized figures is that they allow a gamer to represent a larger battlefield area on the same table top (imagine, for example, trying to depict the whole Gettysburg battlefield on your dining room table using figures 30 mm high. Then imagine using figures one-third that height. The visual effect will be quite different).

Smaller figures, paradoxically, are also easier to paint. They take less time (smaller surface to cover) and some details that demand representation on larger figures (such as lace patterns on Seven Years' War soldiers) can be suggested or ignored on smaller figures.

Consider, also, your preferred gaming arrangement. Do you like to game solo? With one other player? Do you have a regular gaming group? Some game rules, such as Tactica, Armati, and DBA ancients, essentially pit one player against one other player (though they may be played solo). If you have a group of half a dozen friends who plan to play together, then a system allowing for multiple commanders, such as Fire & Fury or Battalions in Crisis, might be preferred.

How much painting experience do you have? Have you ever painted miniatures? If not, I would suggest buying some inexpensive plastic figures, or finding some second-hand "cheap" lead figures at a hobby flea market or hobby shop "clearance" box. Practice "cleaning up" the figures with small files to remove mold seams and "flash" (mold extrusions). Experiment with white primer and black primer to see which effect you like when you add colors. Learn to use different size brushes for accuracy and speed. Try enamel paint and acrylic (water-based) paint to see which medium you prefer to work in (many hobbyists prefer acrylics today, but I'm an old enamels guy).

How much MONEY do you have to spend? Miniatures gaming can be very expensive. A single 28mm infantry figure in lead now sells for anywhere from 90 cents to three dollars, depending on manufacturer, quanty of figures bought and distribution network (not to mention dealer discounts, if you're lucky). Now multiply times four hundred for two modest-sized infantry armies.

Before investing in metal, check out the "Plastic Soldier Review" web site. Many manufacturers are releasing dozens of new sets of plastic miniatures in common 20mm scale each year. These are "soft plastic" figures, and must not be painted with enamels (they bend and the paint chips). But Krylon spray paint for plastics provides a good primer coat for such figures. Acrylic paints adhere just fine if the figure has been washed well in warm water and dish detergent (to remove mold release residue). And the plastic figures are far more affordable than metal.

Finally, consider what "look" you want your miniatures army to have. Do you want it to be colorful? Bristling with spears and swords, banners and shields? Do you want it regular and imposing, rank upon rank of orderly infantry and cavalry with glittering bayonets and sabers? Do you want it mobile and menacing, with battalions of hulking tanks and companies of infantrymen, machine gunners and recce forces ready to roll? Do you want helicopters and wonder weapons? Aliens? Armed and angry hobbits?

It's a lot to think about, but break it down into your "dream army" and start there. Many miniatures gamers got their start falling in love with the visual aspect of some epic movie or other and setting out to re-create that epic on a table top. For me, the catalyst was "Zulu." For you it might be a film, a book or even a video game. Or it might be the battle your grandfather fought in, or a heroic warship named after your hometown.

Whatever your inspiration, miniatures gaming is a wonderful hobby, and I can assure you that right now is the Golden Age. Never in the history of the hobby has there been such a selection of rules, miniatures, periods, scales, accessories, and reference materials as now.

That being said, here's one caveat: thirty years of experience has taught me a compelling principle: In the realm of miniatures and accessories, if you see it, and you know you want it, buy it: you might never see it again.

This further emphasizes the value of planning your period and your armies and doing some research before you start spending your hard-earned cash. Good luck and HAVE FUN!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott
United States
denver
Colorado
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for all the info. There are a few of periods/genres I find intersting:

1. Very far in the future; Book of the New Sun type stuff.

2. Ancients

3. LOTR; except I find it hard to imagine a skirmish-level game on that theme.

4. Perhaps mythological-type stuff.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jesse Smit
Australia
Sydney
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mb
"4. Perhaps mythological-type stuff."
Have you looked at Wargods of Aegyptus? (www.crocodilegames.com) Quite cheap as far as these games go, beautiful miniatures and a simple rule set.

And ill second Warmachine, its the best miniatures game i have ever played.

Do NOT listen to the guy who said heroscape, that game is for 10 year old kids at best.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Washington
United States
Unspecified
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
gpruitt wrote:

If you search BGG for "DBA" you'll find this;
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/299


That would require a reaction more based in "curiousity" than "annoyance", but thanks very much for the explanation...

gpruitt wrote:

I'm surprised that so many people on this list assume the original poster is interested in a fantasy/sci-fi miniatures game...there is reality you know...


Gotta presume this is a general comment for the crowd as whole, since of course my suggestion only presumes the original inquirer is interested in "games known to use less figures and therefore be less expensive than most" and "games known for having particularly uncomplicated rulesets"...even there seem to requires multiple figures per unit, whereas in NECROMUNDA "a dozen units" really means a "dozen figures". Of course, since the original poster has specifically mentioned such a preference...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott
United States
denver
Colorado
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Maybe it would help if you gave some idea as to what $ level you're willing to invest. From a certain point of view, even the GW games are affordable initial investments. You can get WFB for $80 or so, with 2 armies. Not huge armies, but enough to form 2-4


Well...I would like to have enough minis to get 2 people playing for under $50 dollars. If at all possible I would prefer that cost included paints etc.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Robert Washington
United States
Unspecified
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
Checkallday wrote:

Well...I would like to have enough minis to get 2 people playing for under $50 dollars. If at all possible I would prefer that cost included paints etc.


Like I said, I really think this would be possible with NECROMUNDA, since we're talking maybe 8-10 figures per person to start, and that's individual figurines as opposed to "units" of 2-6 figures each. I'm not sure you could get a decent start in any other system at or below that expense point...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob Roberts

Unspecified
msg tools
Avatar
Quote:
Also a little surprised that while 3 different people speak of this "DBA" whatever, not one of them nor the site linked to actually bothers to explain wtf that might be...


Sorry, guess I got the link wrong, the index page here: http://www.fanaticus.org/DBA/index.html is a better start place. And if that website doesn't explain "wtf" DBA is then there is no explanation.
It is also listed here on BGG as was pointed out.
Just remembered, the chaps at the Washington Area DBA Gamers recently released an excellent guide to learning DBA, which can be found here http://www.wadbag.com/DBAGuide/

You can pick up the rules for $15, and there are several pre packed 15mm DBA armies out there for around $25 or so. Paints, for starting out I would suggest Delta craft paint from Wal Mart. Its cheap and does a decent job. I have been painting figs for 20+ years and while I have a large selection of $3 a bottle paints specially made for minis I also have a large selection of those craft paints from Wal-Mart and I still use them regularly.


Necromunda, you can download the rules but they left out the sections on how to actually build a gang. So you would either need to find that info somewhere or buy a copy of the rules...
Necromunda figures run $5-6 each or $40 for one boxed set (one gang).
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave
Canada
Vancouver
British Columbia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
For rules that aren't linked to a particular brand/make of figures, I would recommened either Armies of Arcana (skirmishy like Warhammer where you are dealing with individual models that have to be removed when) or Fantasy Rules! (where you are dealing with groups of models instead). I think that both rule sets are very good, and you can use whatever models you like.

I'd also recommend Warmaster by Games Workshop. The models are 10mm, and you are commanding larger armies but the rules are quite streamlined. You could probably pick up 2 starter armies on eBay for about $50, and the rules are available online (or you could pick up the rulebook).

There is also a Lord of the Rings game based on the Warmaster rules. It is a boxed set called battle of the Five Armies, and comes with the rules and a ton of plastic models(10 mm) fo about $65 US. You get elves, dwarves, men, eagles, the heroes, goblins, worgs and more.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonathan Scott
United States
New Yource
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
I've never played a mini game -- but have been looking at: . If you don't like the game, you can always use your legos for something else .

Has anyone tried any of the brick games? If so, whats your thought on the game?

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Pack
United States
Unspecified
Unspecified
flag msg tools
You might want to look at Combat Zone from EM-4. For 35 bucks you get 30 plastic miniatures, some scenery, dice, and rules. The rules are pretty simple, the miniatures are OK, and you would still have money left over for paints and such.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.