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The Republic of Rome» Forums » Rules

Subject: Prosecutions in absentia? rss

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Robt. Ferrett
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Madison
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Is it possible to prosecute a governor while still at his post? Or does the Senate have to wait until the term ends (or the Governor is replaced and returns the next turn to do a prosecution) to prosecute?

Finally, if it IS possible to prosecute a Governor while he's still at his post, does he get a "popular appeal" roll?

Thanks in advance for any help!
 
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Antonello Salvatucci
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Quote:
Is it possible to prosecute a governor while still at his post? Or does the Senate have to wait until the term ends (or the Governor is replaced and returns the next turn to do a prosecution) to prosecute?


The Prosecution can take place on the turn the senator returns to Rome (6.12)

Quote:
Finally, if it IS possible to prosecute a Governor while he's still at his post, does he get a "popular appeal" roll?


I don't think it's possible to prosecute a governor while he's still at his post. The rules are unclear on this, but my understanding is that you have to be in Rome in order to be prosecuted (and to make a popular appeal).

Hope this helps.
 
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Dan Freedman
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Yep, the governor is safe from prosecutions while away.

Further, in my pbem games, I enforce the provision (in the original rules) that he can only be prosecuted (for being corrupt) on the turn of his return...aka after his 3rd term. I believe the Living rules changed it to allow a prosecution during the *next* turn so as to allow a recalled corrupt-governor to be prosecuted.
 
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John Rodriguez
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Per the living rules a governor is eligable for prosecution per the following:

(1.09.42) D. A Governor who has returned to Rome since the last prosecutions were held and only if he collected personal income from his province during his tenure (corrupt).

Per the original rules - it's anyone's guess. I don't remember any errata covering that.
 
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Dan Freedman
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First and foremost...The living rules are awesome John.

Just a very, very few things I don't agree with. The above addition being one. Mainly because I think it contradicts 6.12 in the original rules..

".....A Governor who tries to collect Personal Revenue from his Province (regardless of result) is considered "corrupt" and subject to possible Prosecutions or fines from Calpurnian Law during the Senate Phase upon his return to Rome. ..."

I also like the tradeoff the above rule offers....ie...if the Senate is going to ship out a senator to a province, those in favor have to live with the fact that he could take personal revenue 3 times before he could be prosecuted for it.
 
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Frank McNally
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".....A Governor who tries to collect Personal Revenue from his Province (regardless of result) is considered "corrupt" and subject to possible Prosecutions or fines from Calpurnian Law during the Senate Phase upon his return to Rome. ..."


I don't have the rules in front of me but I thought the criterion for prosecution was that a sEantor had to have held office (or been a corrupt govenor) or collected concession income in the previous year. Since this would be the case in the Senate pahse after the one in which a govenor was recalled he could be prosecuted. So even without the living rules I have always played he could be prosecuted in the following senate phase.

The oddest order of prosecution effect I know is that you can prosecute the new consul for a crime in the previous year, thus depriving him of his pc marker (if you assume he recieves it along with his office). If I were redoing the game I would disallow prosecution of current office holders since it is very un-roman.
 
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Dan Freedman
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FrankM wrote:
".....A Governor who tries to collect Personal Revenue from his Province (regardless of result) is considered "corrupt" and subject to possible Prosecutions or fines from Calpurnian Law during the Senate Phase upon his return to Rome. ..."


I don't have the rules in front of me but I thought the criterion for prosecution was that a sEantor had to have held office (or been a corrupt govenor) or collected concession income in the previous year. Since this would be the case in the Senate pahse after the one in which a govenor was recalled he could be prosecuted. So even without the living rules I have always played he could be prosecuted in the following senate phase.

The oddest order of prosecution effect I know is that you can prosecute the new consul for a crime in the previous year, thus depriving him of his pc marker (if you assume he recieves it along with his office). If I were redoing the game I would disallow prosecution of current office holders since it is very un-roman.


You are correct in that senators are prosecutable for holding an office the previous year, but that doesn't hold true to corrupt governors. It is specifically worded differently. They are prosecutable the turn they return to Rome. It's mentioned early on in the Revenue phase section of the rules when they explain governor income.
 
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Roberto Ullfig
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It seems that the Living Rules here were written to allow prosecution of governors who are recalled before they finish their term. Realize that every province can have a new governor assigned to it every single senate phase (via the Recall rule). So for instance if there are 12 provinces, all 12 provinces can have a new governor elected to it every single senate phase. Since, governors are elected after prosecutions are conducted such a returning governor could not be prosecuted. So there is a loophole in the original rules but maybe this is not a bad thing anyway, maybe it was intended that way.

Anyway, I don't think corrupt governors are prosecuted often. Senators with concessions are much juicier targets because their lost concession can be assigned to a new senator. I think it's much easier to pull off a prosecution against such a senator than against a returning governor.
 
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