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Subject: Can Someone From Each Team Call Tichu In the Same Round? rss

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James Fehr
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The rules seem unclear about whether more than one person can call Tichu in a round. Obviously it makes no sense for two people on the same team to call Tichu, but what about one person from each team calling Tichu in the same round? Or one calling Tichu while another calls Grand Tichu? Is this allowed?
 
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L. Scott Johnson
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Yes, it is perfectly legal.
 
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Charles Hasegawa
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Yes, someone from each side can indeed, though calling it again after its been called is pretty brave Though depending on what you are holding, it could make for a nice swing in the scores.
 
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Adam Ruprecht
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fehrmeister wrote:
Obviously it makes no sense for two people on the same team to call Tichu


It doesn't come up all that often, but I have seen players correctly call Tichu when it was clear their partner (who had already called Tichu) could not go out.
 
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James Fehr
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Thanks for the quick feedback.
How could it be clear that a player's partner can't go out that early in the game (in time for the player to call Tichu to balance out the score)? If you can't call Tichu after playing your first card, I don't see how this could happen outside of the partner openly stating right away that he/she made a big mistake in calling Tichu and realizes they shouldn't have called it.
 
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Adam Ruprecht
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fehrmeister wrote:

How could it be clear that a player's partner can't go out that early in the game (in time for the player to call Tichu to balance out the score)? If you can't call Tichu after playing your first card, I don't see how this could happen outside of the partner openly stating right away that he/she made a big mistake in calling Tichu and realizes they shouldn't have called it.


When this happens (like I said, it's very rare) usually the player who calls the second Tichu will have a hand that fits very well together (say, two full houses and running pairs, or a very long straight) such that they don't want to play on many things that come through. The easiest way for it to become clear that partner can't go out is having him pass a lowish single with one card left; this can happen without serious miscalculations if the tichuer was betting that there would be no bombs.
 
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Mark McEvoy
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fehrmeister wrote:
Thanks for the quick feedback.
How could it be clear that a player's partner can't go out that early in the game (in time for the player to call Tichu to balance out the score)? If you can't call Tichu after playing your first card, I don't see how this could happen outside of the partner openly stating right away that he/she made a big mistake in calling Tichu and realizes they shouldn't have called it.


It may be borderline tabletalk, but usually the look on the Tichu caller's face (or the volume of his/her sigh) after his/her huge-lead gets bombed or his/her bomb gets overbombed can often tell a whole lot.


Another possibility is if an opponent's MJ wishes an ace with a straight lead... and draws out an Ace bomb from your Tichu-calling partner. At that point it's pretty much curtains for your partner... and if you've got sets and Kings, maybe a good time for you to take control.
 
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David desJardins
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fehrmeister wrote:
Thanks for the quick feedback.
How could it be clear that a player's partner can't go out that early in the game (in time for the player to call Tichu to balance out the score)? If you can't call Tichu after playing your first card, I don't see how this could happen outside of the partner openly stating right away that he/she made a big mistake in calling Tichu and realizes they shouldn't have called it.


It doesn't have to be early in the hand to call Tichu. Often when your partner has called Tichu you won't play on any of the tricks that go by---you're more likely to get in his way than to accomplish something positive. Especially if you have a hand dominated by sets and sequences that is a good candidate to go out fast.
 
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James Fehr
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DaviddesJ wrote:
It doesn't have to be early in the hand to call Tichu.


OK, now I'm really confused. I was sure that you could not call Tichu once you had placed your first card in a round. The game doesn't even make sense if you could call Tichu immediately before losing all of your cards. I understood the rules to say that I can call Grand Tichu after 8 of my cards have been dealt to me, but not after that, and that I can call Tichu only before I've played the first card from my hand (although this could be after other players have played from their hands). Is this not correct?
 
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Adam Ruprecht
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fehrmeister wrote:

OK, now I'm really confused. I was sure that you could not call Tichu once you had placed your first card in a round. The game doesn't even make sense if you could call Tichu immediately before losing all of your cards. I understood the rules to say that I can call Grand Tichu after 8 of my cards have been dealt to me, but not after that, and that I can call Tichu only before I've played the first card from my hand (although this could be after other players have played from their hands). Is this not correct?


This is all correct, but (failing wishes) there is no requirement that you play your first card early in the hand. With, say, KKKQJT98765444, you might hold off on playing a card at all until a full house or low pair comes around; if you're confident that no one can bomb or play aces over your kings, you have a tichu call over a full house.
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Devin Smith
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Sure. But you can still have a hand full of cards when everyone else has one or two, and then call tichu and go out first. It's not 'early' in the hand, but you haven't played yet.

--DHS
 
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James Fehr
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Thanks - Now it's all finally clear to me. I have never played this game with anyone that's had a lot of experience, and I've never seen someone hold onto all of their cards for very long. I'm now a little wiser.
 
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thatmarkguy wrote:
Another possibility is if an opponent's MJ wishes an ace with a straight lead... and draws out an Ace bomb from your Tichu-calling partner. At that point it's pretty much curtains for your partner... and if you've got sets and Kings, maybe a good time for you to take control.

But I was taught and always play that you never wish for something you know the opponent on your left can't furfill (because you passed it to them) for exactly the reason you give (where you could screw your partner).
 
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Adam Ruprecht
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JeffyJeff wrote:

But I was taught and always play that you never wish for something you know the opponent on your left can't furfill (because you passed it to them) for exactly the reason you give (where you could screw your partner).


Some people play that way; other people will make random wishes. The random wish strategy is higher risk, but generally higher reward. If you know from the pass that your partner won't be calling Tichu, why not try to screw up LHO's hand?
 
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Ralph H. Anderson
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I like holding the Sparrow (wish card) till late in the round on certain hands so that once I have figured out what people may have left I can wish something devastating out of their hand. This has worked VERY well for me several times. And in case you are wondering, the rule states that the player WITH the Sparrow starts play. It does not state that he has to play the Sparrow. CAUTION: This is dangerous as the Sparrow can be very difficult to play later, but it can also become a very powerful weapon in your arsenal.

And I have seen three players call Tichu in the same hand. Three guesses who went out first! devil
 
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David desJardins
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JeffyJeff wrote:
But I was taught and always play that you never wish for something you know the opponent on your left can't furfill (because you passed it to them) for exactly the reason you give (where you could screw your partner).


I guess it depends whether you think "screwing" your partner once in a while is the end of the world.

Or whether your partner does.
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