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Subject: Learning to paint for Rivet Wars rss

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Mickey
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I have been playing boardgames simce childhood, but never was interested in miniatures wargames and the painting that comes with it. But recently I purchase and backed on KS many boardgames with minis : Descent: Journeys in the Dark (Second Edition), Mansions of Madness (for which I commissioned a painter), Zombicide, and obviously Rivet Wars: Eastern Front.
The latter's upcoming delivery, gencon demos, were the trigger for me.
I really want to learn to paint these minis.

So I shall start from the beginning, and will try to maintain the discipline to practice and share my progress while asking for the community tips and feedbacks to help me improve.

September 7th 2013
Purchased a Games worshop painting kit

Painted my first mini following the guide in the kit
Time taken ~ 4 hours


I screwed up all the whites by smartly experimenting with the black wash

Questions:
1.1: I was advised to use a pallet instead of directly from pot. I founbd this pretty difficult. How to pick paint from pot to pallet to avoid wasting?
1.2 after the long painting session my brush was not in a good shape, some hair already sticking in weird directions. So how to use a brush properly and maintain it? What to do with odd hair? Clip them?
1.3 The set came with only 1 brush and I have been reading it is better to use 1 brush per color. What say you?
1.4 how to clean pallet and brush? I used thinner and still have blue fingers.


September 8th 2013
Painted my second mini following the guide in the kit
Time taken ~ 4 hours


Questions:
2.1 : I struggled like crazy for details. Obviously my brush is too big, but how to keep steady hands? Is it better to set the mini on some kind of stick? How to do this? Can i use magnifier glass ?
2.2 : when going back to a previous color, I often found the color dried up on the pallet. How to keep it from drying?
2.3 : how to clean properly the brush when changing colors? I simply washed it in water but the still were traces of all previous paints in the bristles
2.4 : Because of the black primer, I often had to add 2 or 3 layers of paint to keep it bright. But that many layers covers up the details. Is it better to prime in white or black or other colors ? When to use which?

P.S: feel free to bash the results, but please help me by providing tips too.


September 10th 2013
http://boardgamegeek.com/article/13381260#13381260

September 15th/17th 2013
http://boardgamegeek.com/article/13436991#13436991
 
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Mark Edwards
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Heishiro1976 wrote:
Questions:
1.1: I was advised to use a pallet instead of directly from pot. I founbd this pretty difficult. How to pick paint from pot to pallet to avoid wasting?


You can use your brush or another brush to transfer the paint to the pallet. It is assumed that once you do this, you will add water to thin your paints.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
1.2 after the long painting session my brush was not in a good shape, some hair already sticking in weird directions. So how to use a brush properly and maintain it? What to do with odd hair? Clip them?


Do not clip them, you will ruin the brush even more. Clean the brush in some alcohol, then rinse it in clean water. Then use your fingers or mouth to reform the bristles.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
1.3 The set came with only 1 brush and I have been reading it is better to use 1 brush per color. What say you?


That seems a bit overkill. Having multiple brushes would be ideal especially when you try using different techniques such as drybrushing or blending.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
1.4 how to clean pallet and brush? I used thinner and still have blue fingers.


Soap and water. These are acrylics, you shouldn't be using thinner.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
2.1 : I struggled like crazy for details. Obviously my brush is too big, but how to keep steady hands? Is it better to set the mini on some kind of stick? How to do this? Can i use magnifier glass ?


It varies by person, you can use a magnifier, you can temporarily mount the miniature on another object using poster putty or two sided foam tape.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
2.2 : when going back to a previous color, I often found the color dried up on the pallet. How to keep it from drying?


There is paint retarder that will help with this. If you feel brave enough, you can also look into making a wet pallet.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
2.3 : how to clean properly the brush when changing colors? I simply washed it in water but the still were traces of all previous paints in the bristles


That should work, you may need to try multiple times and to also wipe the brush off on some paper towels.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
2.4 : Because of the black primer, I often had to add 2 or 3 layers of paint to keep it bright. But that many layers covers up the details. Is it better to prime in white or black or other colors ? When to use which?


Depends on the colors you are using, sometimes it is better to prime white, sometimes black. You can always prime black then pick out certain areas to prime them white before painting them. Some difficult colors to paint such as red or yellow, I'll prime those sections a brown before painting the base colors.

For further advice, you can always look on painting websites. CoolMiniOrNot.com has some good articles/tutorials and they also have forums where you can ask questions and search out advice.
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Chris Smith
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First off for a first miniature you did a good job.

Quote:
1.1: I was advised to use a pallet instead of directly from pot. I founbd this pretty difficult. How to pick paint from pot to pallet to avoid wasting?


I would advise against using a pallet with citadel paints - they dry far too fast. they have a catch that holds the lid open at at 90 degree angle so you can take paint from the lid lip - use that. For other companies paints a pallet is okay, specifically I would suggest Vallejo paints as they come in a bottle with a dropper top so you can just put a few drops on a pallet.

Quote:
1.2 after the long painting session my brush was not in a good shape, some hair already sticking in weird directions. So how to use a brush properly and maintain it? What to do with odd hair? Clip them?


Multiple brushes - get like 4 or 5 of different sizes so you are not constantly using the same one. Also wash the paint out frequently, even during that same color use. Also get brushes from a hobby or craft store - GW brushes are kinda crap. You can just clip or cut off stray brush hairs with a x-acto knife or nail clipper.

Quote:
1.3 The set came with only 1 brush and I have been reading it is better to use 1 brush per color. What say you?


I use 4-5 brushes of different sizes when painting a model. Right size for the right job. A brush per color seems overkill.

Quote:
1.4 how to clean pallet and brush? I used thinner and still have blue fingers


Just room temperature water for your brush. Have water right nearby when painting so you can keep your brushes clean while painting. Don't leave you brush in the water - wash it by swishing, not grinding the brush. Run it over some paper towel to see if any paint remains. Paint thinner is for oil paints - mode model paints are acrylic and water is fine. Dish soap and hot water should clean your pallet.

Quote:
2.1 : I struggled like crazy for details. Obviously my brush is too big, but how to keep steady hands? Is it better to set the mini on some kind of stick? How to do this? Can i use magnifier glass ?


Right sized brush for the job makes a huge difference. To keep your hands and the model steady and in sync keep your hands together so the heel of your palms touch while painting - this limits the independent movement each hand will do from the other. Also practice will be the big effect with details.

Quote:
2.2 : when going back to a previous color, I often found the color dried up on the pallet. How to keep it from drying?


I covered this above.

Quote:
2.3 : how to clean properly the brush when changing colors? I simply washed it in water but the still were traces of all previous paints in the bristles


I'll mention again - most model paints dry fairly quickly - wash the brush often when using even the same color to avoid dry paint on the brush.

Quote:
2.4 : Because of the black primer, I often had to add 2 or 3 layers of paint to keep it bright. But that many layers covers up the details. Is it better to prime in white or black or other colors ? When to use which?


Personal preference for me is black primer unless the model is going to be all very bright/light colors. Before painting a bright color on a part of the model paint some white then the bright color. Also depending on the pigment level of the paint some colors will require multiple coats to get the desired level of brightness/coverage.

Cheers and best of luck.
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Ryan Morgan
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first off, the model looks good to me. I think you did good work.

Quote:
Questions:
1.1: I was advised to use a pallet instead of directly from pot. I founbd this pretty difficult. How to pick paint from pot to pallet to avoid wasting?
1.2 after the long painting session my brush was not in a good shape, some hair already sticking in weird directions. So how to use a brush properly and maintain it? What to do with odd hair? Clip them?
1.3 The set came with only 1 brush and I have been reading it is better to use 1 brush per color. What say you?
1.4 how to clean pallet and brush? I used thinner and still have blue fingers.


1.1 When I use GW paint I paint from the pot. The lids are designed to be used that way, I thought. I normally just use cheap paint from an arts and crafts store. I do have a pallet for those. Some paint does get wasted.

1.2 Make sure to wash your brush frequently. When painting for long periods of time your brush will collect dry paint and ruin it.

1.3 I use multiple brushes, but different sizes for different jobs.

1.4 again, clean the brush frequently and water should be fine. I don't even bother cleaning my pallet. I just put more paint on top of it. Eventually I plan to scrape it. My "pallet" is a piece of plastic i found. I've been known to use a piece of card board and toss it after I paint.


Quote:
2.1 : I struggled like crazy for details. Obviously my brush is too big, but how to keep steady hands? Is it better to set the mini on some kind of stick? How to do this? Can i use magnifier glass ?
2.2 : when going back to a previous color, I often found the color dried up on the pallet. How to keep it from drying?
2.3 : how to clean properly the brush when changing colors? I simply washed it in water but the still were traces of all previous paints in the bristles
2.4 : Because of the black primer, I often had to add 2 or 3 layers of paint to keep it bright. But that many layers covers up the details. Is it better to prime in white or black or other colors ? When to use which?


2.1 When I need a super steady hand I place both elbows on the table and choke way up on the brush. I find this helps me maintain a fairly steady grip.

2.2 You can't, as far as I know. I just use little bits at a time.

2.3 I run the brush through water and then dab it in a paper towel. Sometimes I will flip flop back and forth between two brushes. If you wash the brush during a color its easier to remove the paint.

2.4 I prime black 90% of the time, but I paint differently. I'll explain.

I use a technique called dry brushing. I take a brush with a broad head and dip it in the paint. Then I wipe the brush on a paper towel until nearly all the paint has left the brush. Then I brush it onto the model and the paint catches the raised areas of the figure, leaving the black in the lower portions. This has an added effect of highlighting all the detailed areas and making it easier for me to paint them.

I usually start by dry brushing my black model brown. Then I dry brush my main color. Then I paint on everything else. Its a quick process and I can paint 1 figure in under an hour.

When you want a light/bright color on a black base start with a dark color and layer it up to the lighter color. Brown/Light brown/white/white or Brown/Brick Red/Red

Occasionally when I'm feeling lazy I'll prime them in a dark version of their primary color and then dry brush the proper color. For example, I spray painted all the terminators in space hulk brick red and then dry brushed them red before painting on the details. It sped up the process a bit.

Finally, I'm not sure were your from, but were i'm from a product called simple green will take paint off a figure without ruining it. Once I learned about that I was no longer afraid to slap paint on a figure or experiment. My speed and technique has greatly improved because I could practice without worrying I was destroying a figure.

Hope I helped a bit, good luck!
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Heishiro1976 wrote:
I really want to learn to paint these minis.


Welcome to the dark side! I never thought I would paint minis. Then I backed Kingdom Death: Monster and I figured I had to learn. I took a beginner class at GenCon last year and a few more classes this year. I have painted several hundred minis and have really come a long way. It is great fun!

Did you watch the videos they posted in the Rivet Wars KS comments? They were pretty good. Also consider joining the Miniature Painters Guild.

FYI, my latest work has really shown how far I have come along in only 1 year (these really look better in person BTW):



And everything I have painted so far:

http://boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/156170/kirks-painted-minis

Now, on to your questions!

Heishiro1976 wrote:
I screwed up all the whites by smartly experimenting with the black wash


Washes are the secret to decent-looking minis, although black wash is tricky. I tend to use brown a lot as you can get away with a lot more. For black and brown wash these are really good in that they come well-diluted already: http://www.thewarstore.com/didismagicink.html.

I also used to wash the whole mini and now I do it much more selectively. The white should be washed with a light brown or a gray watered down quite a bit. At this point you can easily re-paint the white over it though.

Heishiro1976 wrote:

1.1: I was advised to use a pallet instead of directly from pot. I founbd this pretty difficult. How to pick paint from pot to pallet to avoid wasting?


The problem is that it is important to water the paint down. You want about 50% paint, 50% water. In order to do this you must scoop the paint out of the pot onto the palette. I use the handle of my brush. Now, when I just need a dab of paint or I'm doing minor details then I'll paint right out of the pot.

Personally I have both pots (P3) and dropper bottles (Vallejo). I tend to use the latter most of the time because it is easier to mix on my palette.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
1.2 after the long painting session my brush was not in a good shape, some hair already sticking in weird directions. So how to use a brush properly and maintain it? What to do with odd hair? Clip them?


After ruining lots of brushes I finally figured out the most important thing: you need to keep your brush clean and wet all the time. And try to keep paint only on the tip (only mix paints with the back of your brush). So I dip the tip in, do a bit of painting, and rinse, and then get more paint, more painting, and rinse again. I never go more than 60s without rinsing my brush.

When I rinse I have a cup with water and I vigorously swish the brush in there without harming the tip. I then dab the side of the bristles on a paper towel to dry. Then I get more paint.

I used to only rinse between colors and that is primarily what I think ruined my brushes. I also just started using better brushes as well, but I don't think that is something you need to do right away.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
1.3 The set came with only 1 brush and I have been reading it is better to use 1 brush per color. What say you?


I typically use a few brushes, but the number of colors doesn't impact that (read above: I rinse them constantly). You want one small brush with a very fine tip for details (tip is most important), one larger brush for big areas, a flat-tipped dry-brush, and perhaps a junk brush for metallic paints or large areas.

Heishiro1976 wrote:
1.4 how to clean pallet and brush? I used thinner and still have blue fingers.


If you keep your brush clean and wet it won't need to be thoroughly cleaned. My palette has dried paint all over it. I just keep layering more and more paint. Eventually I'll just throw it away and get another one for a few dollars.

As for your hands, some people use gloves, but I just let it wear off. After my shower in the morning it is usually mostly gone. If you really scrub with something abrasive it will come off.

Looking at your mini it is great for your first time! If you use thinner paint (as I mentioned above) you'll see more detail. Sometimes you have to do two coats though, but it is better that way. I think you could have used more wash on most of the mini (besides the white of course). Other thing is to take more care on the boundaries between colors. I tend to paint the lowest areas first (e.g. the skin, the white robe) and then paint outer areas. When you paint the outer areas, use the very tip of your brush to paint the edge of that item (like the bottom of his breast plate that has some white paint on it: it looks like perhaps you painted the white after the metal).

Heishiro1976 wrote:

2.1 : I struggled like crazy for details. Obviously my brush is too big, but how to keep steady hands? Is it better to set the mini on some kind of stick? How to do this? Can i use magnifier glass ?


When I first started painting I bought all of the smallest brushes I could buy, but they didn't hold tips that well. Now I got a nicer brush that is still small but not tiny and has a great tip: that works much better. Also I find that as my skill improved (with practice) I don't need as fine of a brush as I used to.

This is the hard part for everybody, though. You will make mistakes: paint one color, then paint the next color, then go back and fix the first color where you messed it up.

Many people mount their mini to the lid of a pot of paint or a cork (from a bottle of wine) using sticky poster tack. It can help, but if there is a base I usually just hold the mini by the base.

Many people use magnifying devices. Personally I am very near-sighted so I just take my glasses off when I need to see fine detail.

Heishiro1976 wrote:

2.2 : when going back to a previous color, I often found the color dried up on the pallet. How to keep it from drying?


You can use a wet palette (e.g.: http://www.thewarstore.com/product48389.html) and the paint will stay wet for hours or even days.

Personally, though, I only use that for custom-mixed colors that I need to keep around for a while. Normally I just mix on my regular palette, but I only do 1 drop of paint and 1 drop of water. Then I paint that color everywhere. If I need it later and it is dry, just do a bit more (perhaps half a drop).

Heishiro1976 wrote:

2.3 : how to clean properly the brush when changing colors? I simply washed it in water but the still were traces of all previous paints in the bristles


I think that is a combination of a cheap brush, infrequent washing, and getting the paint too high up in the bristles. Wash by swishing the brush in a cup every 60s or so, don't mix or scoop paint with the bristles, etc.

Heishiro1976 wrote:

2.4 : Because of the black primer, I often had to add 2 or 3 layers of paint to keep it bright. But that many layers covers up the details. Is it better to prime in white or black or other colors ? When to use which?


For a mini like this I think it is best to prime in white. If your mini has brighter colors prime in white, if the mini is darker prime in black. It is good to do multiple layers, but be sure your paint is properly thinned first. I would prime this white and it would take two layers for most of the colors.
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Mickey
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions, I am now trying to apply some of them. and I already get better results. I tipped each of you a GG for the efforts to answer my noobs questions.

Here is what new techniques I started to apply:
I blue-tacked the mini-base on a bottle that I can grab more easily.
I try to lock my wrists or put elbows on table to get more steady hands.
I was using and cleaning the brush wrong or not often enough, now I fixed that.
I was putting too much paint on the brush, fixed.
I shall not use thinner again.
I got a bigger flat brush for priming, and a fine brush for details.
I paint directly from the pot, and here goes my pallet problems, although I can't mix colors, but I am not yet there

Here are my latest attempts which took me less than 2 hours each including set-up of material / desk

September 11th
New model type : goblin from Lord of the ring painting set.



This was easier to paint probably because the surfaces were all easier to reach than the elfs'.
This time I struggled with fine details white highlights as shown in the painting guide.


So I used a finer brush for the highlights on a second model

the brush is new and I still was not able to make really thin strands of white paint where I wanted, it was either a blob of paint where I wanted or a thin line where I did not want.
I put very little paint on the brush, and even brushed of some of it on paper towel, to no avail.

Questions:
4.1 : How to do those very thin lines ?
4.2 : while painting from the pot removed my problems with paint drying, how to have a good mix of water/paint on the brush. I hear or read we need 50/50. how to achieve that? I swished the brush in water run it on paper towel then eventually in my palm's heart line and swirl to reshape the tip. Then dip only extreme tip of the brush in paint and scrub the excess on the pot rim.
 
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Jonah Rees
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Heishiro1976 wrote:
Thanks everyone for the suggestions, I am now trying to apply some of them. and I already get better results. I tipped each of you a GG for the efforts to answer my noobs questions.

Here is what new techniques I started to apply:
I blue-tacked the mini-base on a bottle that I can grab more easily.
I try to lock my wrists or put elbows on table to get more steady hands.
I was using and cleaning the brush wrong or not often enough, now I fixed that.
I was putting too much paint on the brush, fixed.
I shall not use thinner again.
I got a bigger flat brush for priming, and a fine brush for details.
I paint directly from the pot, and here goes my pallet problems, although I can't mix colors, but I am not yet there

Here are my latest attempts which took me less than 2 hours each including set-up of material / desk

September 11th
New model type : goblin from Lord of the ring painting set.



This was easier to paint probably because the surfaces were all easier to reach that the elfs.
This time I struggled with fine details white highlights as shown in the painting guide.


So I used a finer brush for the highlights on a second model

the brush is new and I still was not able to make really thin strands of white paint where I wanted, it was either a blob of paint where I wanted or a thin line where I did not want.
I put very little paint on the brush, and even brushed of some of it on paper towel, to no avail.

Questions:
4.1 : How to do those very thin lines ?
4.2 : while painting from the pot removed my problems with paint drying, how to have a good mix of water/paint on the brush. I hear or read we need 50/50. how to achieve that? I swished the brush in water run it on paper towel then eventually in my palm's heart line and swirl to reshape the tip. Then dip only extreme tip of the brush in paint and scrub the excess on the pot rim.


Those are really good and you should be proud of them, considering they are some of your first efforts too it is incredibly impressive. With regards to your questions:

4.1 Practice! More obviously use a very fine brush (I use a Windsor and Newton Series 7 size 00) and just practice practice practice. Make sure you have only a small amount of paint on your brush too as if you don't get enough on you can always add more but if you get too much you have to wipe quickly. When I'm trying to paint thin lines I tend to start moving my brushes slowly before I get to the miniature and then try getting it to touch the miniature

4.2 To get the right consistency for the paint you want to mix it up on a palette. So put paint on the palette, gives your brush a rinse then either flick the water off inside the jar but above the water line (which is what I do) or dry some of the water off on kitchen paper. Then mix the water in with the paint on the palette to get the right consistency (somewhat like milk), rinse brush again and then start using the mix from the palette. Like with the too little rather than too much theory above it's better than it's too thin than too thick as it will start to thicken as it dries and you can always add more layers of paint.
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Thanks Jonah, have 1 GG for your tips. I can't take much credit because I just follow the Citadel painting guide provided in the box, and try to replicate what they show. after 4 minis I am not yet confident to try new color schemes or creative technics... Just going through the basics.

I remember you backed Zombicide season2 right? I picked up this LOTR painting box thinking it could be a good color scheme for the zombies, although might need to go a bit paler. What would you say ?
 
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Heishiro1976 wrote:
Thanks Jonah, have 1 GG for your tips. I can't take much credit because I just follow the Citadel painting guide provided in the box, and try to replicate what they show. after 4 minis I am not yet confident to try new color schemes or creative technics... Just going through the basics.

I remember you backed Zombicide season2 right? I picked up this LOTR painting box thinking it could be a good color scheme for the zombies, although might need to go a bit paler. What would you say ?


Following the guides is a good way to start but don't be afraid to try new things as that's how your learn how the paint and washes behave. Washes in particular are your friend when it comes to painting gross skin. If you check out my Warseer PLOG here I am doing a Nurgle themed Ogre army. If you don't know anything about GW it's basically the god of decay so I've done open wounds and manky skin on them. I started off with them quite green which you see in the first few pages but if you flick through later on you can see my more regular skin than I've discoloured using washes.

I think you've picked a great set to practice painting the sort of skin you want to do on zombies and for me they are pale enough but that's personal preference, you should paint them however you like. Painting them a similar colour then using washes to discolour the flesh will make them look more rotten. Greens, reds, purples and browns are your friend!

I'm not sure these are the best miniatures to learn to paint Rivet Wars with though. Keep practising with these as use of paint and good brush control are the most important things to learn but the Rivet Wars miniatures are a lot flatter with less detail so you may want to try picking up some Chibi style miniatures like the ones with Super Dungeon Explore or some Reaper Bones minis and practice on those. You might want to try on some vehicles too as painting larger things is different to painting regular 28mm miniatures. However, you clearly have skill and a willingness to learn so I don't think you will have any issues at all.
 
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September 14th / 17th


With this model I tried different approaches. I originally primed it white, as i wanted it paler then added the flesh layer watered down as a wash but it was looking very bad as the primer coat was very grainy, so I just reprimed it with the flesh primer without bothering removing the paint.

I used brown washes to bring out the details of the leathery equipment, and experimented with dry brushing to replace the thin lines of highlights which I still don't know how to do right.

The result is ok, although the skin looks more grainy than the previous model.


Here again the skin looks more grainy than the model done on september ... which looked really smooth. It seems the thicker the primer coat the smoother it will be.
To avoid blotches during the "crimson" wash, I used a fine brush and results are good.

Dry brushed the details with a Pallid white, but a bit too much paint so had to repaint the face.

I am quite satisfied with this model.

Questions:

5.1 : Can primer be used a the main color like in this model, or is it more common to use another layer on top of primer ?
5.2 : Should the layer of primer looked very grainy or smooth ?
5.3: Someone showed me a technique similar to dry brushing to prime models, with almost no water, is it a common technique ? any pros and cons ?

6.1 : Dry brushing: shall I first wet my brush to soften the bristles, or directly use a dry brush ?
6.2 : How to check if I have too much paint on my brush for dry brushing ?
 
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Christopher Taylor
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5.2 Primer should be smooth. If it is grainy, there was probably too much humidity in the air when you primered your models. Don't primer when it is humid!

6.1 I've done it with dry brushes and wet brushes. Both worked.

6.2 Wipe the brush on a paper towel until it doesn't make any marks. You need very little paint on the brush to drybrush.
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Heishiro1976 wrote:
5.1 : Can primer be used a the main color like in this model, or is it more common to use another layer on top of primer ?


Yes, I prime all the time in a color that is predominant on the minis. For example, for Zombicide, I primed the zombies in "Necrotic Flesh". In this case they had regular paint that matched the primer so if I made mistakes I could touch it up, otherwise you may end up repainting a thin layer of paint over the primer if you make any mistakes (still easier than painting the base coat starting from black/white).

Heishiro1976 wrote:

5.2 : Should the layer of primer looked very grainy or smooth ?


It should be very smooth. If you are using spray-on primer, consider a good brand (I use P3), don't put too much on in one coat, don't get too far from the spray head, etc.

Heishiro1976 wrote:

5.3: Someone showed me a technique similar to dry brushing to prime models, with almost no water, is it a common technique ? any pros and cons ?


Never heard of it myself.

Heishiro1976 wrote:


6.1 : Dry brushing: shall I first wet my brush to soften the bristles, or directly use a dry brush ?


I usually wet first, you don't need it super stiff usually.

Heishiro1976 wrote:

6.2 : How to check if I have too much paint on my brush for dry brushing ?


For true dry brushing you should brush the paper towel until you can barely see any paint coming off the brush. The dry means the brush is nearly dry of paint.
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Mickey
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anarchy wrote:
5.2 Primer should be smooth. If it is grainy, there was probably too much humidity in the air when you primered your models. Don't primer when it is humid!


Don't have much choice here, I stay in a humid country although I work under air-conditioning.
I forgot to mention that until now I used brush to prime models, not spray. Originally I wet the brush then primed and it took time and a few coats, loosing details in the process. But then someone showed me how to prime with brush pretty much like dry brushing but with slightly more paint on the brush. It is much quicker, dries faster almost instantaneously or within seconds, but has a grainy feel. Could it be the lack of water in the paint ? Shall primers/foundation paints be cut with paint like layer paints ?
 
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Christopher Taylor
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Ahhh! I was referring to spray primers. I don't brush my primer on, but I would imagine that dry brushing primer could led to a grainy feel. Primering is very important. I would personally spend the extra time to do it right.
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Mark Edwards
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If you're looking for a paint on primer, you may want to look into gesso.
 
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