Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
7 Posts

Bonaparte at Marengo» Forums » Rules

Subject: Limit of blocks in an approach? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
David Hansen
United States
Rochester
New York
flag msg tools
mb
Am I correct in my understanding that there is no limit to the number of blocks that can be in any one approach (aside from the locale's overarching stacking limit, of course)?

I see nothing in the rulebook to suggest that there would be such a limit, but for some reason I recall someone mentioning to me that in BaM, no more than 2 pieces can be in any one approach, and it's undermining my grasp of this rule.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Hansen
United States
Rochester
New York
flag msg tools
mb
Of course. But is there a limit (excluding the locale's capacity limit) to how many blocks can go into an approach?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Interesting... It is a bit confusing since the rules say "Approaches can be either narrow (as wide as one piece) or wide (as wide as two pieces)."

That makes it sound a little bit like the width (narrow or wide) determines if one or two pieces can be on that approach.

I.e., the physical space on the map seems to be designed to hold 1 or 2 pieces - but in fact that physical/graphic mnemonic is only to indicate the number of "leading" pieces in combat.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Hansen
United States
Rochester
New York
flag msg tools
mb
Gene is definitely correct; I'm not sure where I got the idea that there was a limit. I think I just needed to hear someone else say it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James Hébert
United States
Topeka
Kansas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
russ wrote:
Interesting... It is a bit confusing since the rules say "Approaches can be either narrow (as wide as one piece) or wide (as wide as two pieces)."

That makes it sound a little bit like the width (narrow or wide) determines if one or two pieces can be on that approach.

I.e., the physical space on the map seems to be designed to hold 1 or 2 pieces - but in fact that physical/graphic mnemonic is only to indicate the number of "leading" pieces in combat.


I believe the map was designed so that areas of "like" terrain characteristics were abstracted into locales during the map's design.

Bowen probably saw that he needed a way to address odd-length sides, chose to redraw the areas as needed, then define them as single- and double-width lengths intentionally.

The terms "narrow" and "wide" were likely coined to describe these different-length sides, not to alter a locale's capacity but to address the fact that some locales may have longer sides.

More than likely this also led to the rules addressing attacks crossing wide approaches.

Mind, all this is a guess on my part!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.