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Subject: Resistance Roulette rss

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Jeff Rohrer
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Recommended for 7-9 experienced players

This is a variant conjured up by my gaming circle in an effort to add a little extra realism to the game. The result was so brutal but exciting that we renamed it after Russian Roulette. Enjoy.

Change #1: Randomize the Spy Ratio

When handing out the cards, don't bother sorting out the correct number of spies and resistance members; instead deal out the cards, then put the remainder someplace out of reach.

I should warn that this can go horribly wrong in all the right ways. You could plausibly wind up with four spies and a resistance member, or one spy and four resistance members, or even all resistance members, which is why I recommend playing with 7-9 players; you still might get incredibly imbalanced numbers, but the imbalance is less severe and far rarer. Games with a horrible imbalance can be fun on occasion, but should be avoided if possible.

That being said, not knowing how many spies are in the game gives a wonderful air of suspicion and second-guessing, where rather than playing math games to deduce who is the spy, you're entirely reliant upon deduction skills once more. Things get more interesting when the next rule is thrown in.

Change #2: Skip the Identify Phase

After dealing out the identity cards and allowing everyone to peek at their cards, commence play immediately. You may choose to take each round out of sequence per the official variant rules. You may also choose to play with intrigue cards as per your choice.

The effect of these two rules is to render the spies effectively blind. They do not know how many cohorts they have or who they might be. This forces spies to play a little more deep cover and risks spies accidentally blowing their cover, as with multiple spies playing failure cards. This has the added effect, however, of making it next to impossible for the resistance to rout out the entire spy network based upon player interactions, and muddies the water when a failure card appears.

In total, Resistance Roulette can be as brutal as its name. I've seen games where the spies swept to victory, games where the resistance cleaned house, and many, many games full of bickering, back-biting, and extremely close calls. If you're playing with a group that's bored with the normal rules of The Resistance, I highly recommend this variant.
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bob atkins
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Anithias wrote:
Recommended for 7-9 experienced players

This is a variant conjured up by my gaming circle in an effort to add a little extra realism to the game. The result was so brutal but exciting that we renamed it after Russian Roulette. Enjoy.

Change #1: Randomize the Spy Ratio

When handing out the cards, don't bother sorting out the correct number of spies and resistance members; instead deal out the cards, then put the remainder someplace out of reach.

I should warn that this can go horribly wrong in all the right ways. You could plausibly wind up with four spies and a resistance member, or one spy and four resistance members, or even all resistance members, which is why I recommend playing with 7-9 players; you still might get incredibly imbalanced numbers, but the imbalance is less severe and far rarer. Games with a horrible imbalance can be fun on occasion, but should be avoided if possible.

That being said, not knowing how many spies are in the game gives a wonderful air of suspicion and second-guessing, where rather than playing math games to deduce who is the spy, you're entirely reliant upon deduction skills once more. Things get more interesting when the next rule is thrown in.

Change #2: Skip the Identify Phase

After dealing out the identity cards and allowing everyone to peek at their cards, commence play immediately. You may choose to take each round out of sequence per the official variant rules. You may also choose to play with intrigue cards as per your choice.

The effect of these two rules is to render the spies effectively blind. They do not know how many cohorts they have or who they might be. This forces spies to play a little more deep cover and risks spies accidentally blowing their cover, as with multiple spies playing failure cards. This has the added effect, however, of making it next to impossible for the resistance to rout out the entire spy network based upon player interactions, and muddies the water when a failure card appears.

In total, Resistance Roulette can be as brutal as its name. I've seen games where the spies swept to victory, games where the resistance cleaned house, and many, many games full of bickering, back-biting, and extremely close calls. If you're playing with a group that's bored with the normal rules of The Resistance, I highly recommend this variant.


I don't think the spies should be blind. The rest sounds good. also, you should make the first role card a spy to guarantee you get a spy in the game. It would be silly if everyone was resistance in the end.
 
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mfl134
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varoan wrote:
Anithias wrote:
Recommended for 7-9 experienced players

This is a variant conjured up by my gaming circle in an effort to add a little extra realism to the game. The result was so brutal but exciting that we renamed it after Russian Roulette. Enjoy.

Change #1: Randomize the Spy Ratio

When handing out the cards, don't bother sorting out the correct number of spies and resistance members; instead deal out the cards, then put the remainder someplace out of reach.

I should warn that this can go horribly wrong in all the right ways. You could plausibly wind up with four spies and a resistance member, or one spy and four resistance members, or even all resistance members, which is why I recommend playing with 7-9 players; you still might get incredibly imbalanced numbers, but the imbalance is less severe and far rarer. Games with a horrible imbalance can be fun on occasion, but should be avoided if possible.

That being said, not knowing how many spies are in the game gives a wonderful air of suspicion and second-guessing, where rather than playing math games to deduce who is the spy, you're entirely reliant upon deduction skills once more. Things get more interesting when the next rule is thrown in.

Change #2: Skip the Identify Phase

After dealing out the identity cards and allowing everyone to peek at their cards, commence play immediately. You may choose to take each round out of sequence per the official variant rules. You may also choose to play with intrigue cards as per your choice.

The effect of these two rules is to render the spies effectively blind. They do not know how many cohorts they have or who they might be. This forces spies to play a little more deep cover and risks spies accidentally blowing their cover, as with multiple spies playing failure cards. This has the added effect, however, of making it next to impossible for the resistance to rout out the entire spy network based upon player interactions, and muddies the water when a failure card appears.

In total, Resistance Roulette can be as brutal as its name. I've seen games where the spies swept to victory, games where the resistance cleaned house, and many, many games full of bickering, back-biting, and extremely close calls. If you're playing with a group that's bored with the normal rules of The Resistance, I highly recommend this variant.


I don't think the spies should be blind. The rest sounds good. also, you should make the first role card a spy to guarantee you get a spy in the game. It would be silly if everyone was resistance in the end.


spies have to be blind, otherwise you just wait until Mx.5 and throw all fails.
 
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