Scott Ristich
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It only took about a month to sum up the courage, but I finally decided to paint my miniatures for Last Night on Earth: Timber Peak. My sister volunteered to help me since she tends to like this kind of stuff, and having two people really sped up the whole process. We used grubman's thread on the dipping method as a guideline, and made some creative decisions of our own. Here is grubman's thread if you want to check it out:

http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/448494/last-night-on-earth-z...

First, we primered the miniatures using a standard grey primer (I used Valspar 85055 Grey Primer). We made sure to let it dry thoroughly before painting. To be on the safe side, we let it sit overnight.

For the actual painting process, we used some of the cheapest acrylic paints we could find. We bought them from Joanne Fabrics and Hobby Lobby. The three brands we ended up using were Americana, FolkArt, and Ceramcoat. They ranged in price from $0.77 to $1.25 a piece for the 2 ounce bottles. We painted these miniatures much in the same way as grubman did. My sister spent a fair bit of time focusing on the detail work for the heroes, making them as true to the original artwork as possible. We then painted colored stripes on the sides of the bases to help distinguish between the heroes, “green” zombies, and “brown” zombies.







Once we were satisfied with the paint job, we decided to go ahead and "dirty up" the zombies a little bit. We used a couple different shades of red for blood, and then dry brushed with some brown and faint yellow to make the clothes look tattered and grimy. Zombies gotta be scary, right?






For the shading, we decided to only “dip” the zombies. Because we wanted the heroes to be clean and detailed, we kept them out of the stain. To dip the zombies, we used the same Polyshade stain that grubman used: Minwax Polyshade Antique Walnut Satin. We shook up the can vigorously after every 3-4 zombies, dipped them for only a quick second with needle nose pliers, and then immediately took them out and gave them 25 hard shakes a piece to remove the excess stain. They came out looking a little darker than we expected, but the dullcote we applied at the end actually seemed to brighten them up (which I discuss later). Looking back, I think it would’ve been worth looking into brushing on the dip as opposed to submerging the entire miniature in the stain. This way, you can use a brush to ensure good coverage and an even coat. Still, we were happy with the results in the end.

For the heroes, we decided that we would shade with a wash instead. My sister did all the shading, and she used Citadel Agrax Earthshade for the items and clothing, and Reikland Fleshshade for the skin. Be sure to have plenty of wash on the brush and apply enough for it to settle into all of the cracks and recesses. During this process, it helps to occasionally wipe off your brush on a clean sheet of paper towel and then go back over the higher areas to remove any excess stain that may be darkening areas that don’t need to be darkened. In hindsight, we probably should have done a bit more of this, but they came out just fine nonetheless.
After applying the wash to the heroes, we went back and did some touch up work on the figures, reapplying paint as well as drybrushing things like the drifter’s satchel in order to bring out a little more detail.
For the tops of the zombie bases, we simply covered them with regular old Elmer’s white glue and then dunked them in either grass or fine dirt flock. I found these particular types of flock from a train hobby store, but I’ve seen them at Hobby Lobby as well.

For the heroes, we used the same method for applying the fine gravel. To take it a step further, we let the glue dry and then applied loc-tite liquid superglue to random areas on top of the gravel, then repeated the process. This time, however, we dunked them into a bag of medium gravel. This gave the bases a more detailed, varied, and realistic look.



After letting the miniatures dry sufficiently (we waited about 8 hours or so), we gave both the zombies and the heroes a thorough coat of Testors Dullcote and then let them dry overnight. The next day, we woke up to find that the dullcote had indeed gotten rid of the shine on the zombies, and brightened them up a bit as well.

The work isn’t trivial, but it’s definitely doable. As I see it, it’s time, effort, and money well spent.

Here are a few before and after shots:





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After painting:

After dipping:

After dullcote:
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Brandon Alderman
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Shady Spring
West Virginia
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Very nice I like the dullcote finish I need to get the balls to paint mine I'm just scared of fucking them up
 
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C Cooper
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Don't be afraid! The great thing about painting I discovered is that if you do something you hate (which for me is frequent!) you just paint over it - eventually it looks fantastic. Some of my first attempts now have five layers of experimentation!
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Scott Ristich
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It's really wasn't that hard to do, but it does take a little time. There were 2 of us working through the whole project, and we did it in about a week (including drying times). My advice would be to research and prepare as much as you can, then just dive in. This was our first attempt with the dip method, and it worked out great. You learn a lot along the way, but you get a feel for it pretty quickly.
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Mauricio Montoya
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Thanks for the idea and the tips... I hadn't tried to paint any of my figures since a fatal attemp many years ago when the paint I used ate through my D&D 2nd edition minis (we didn't have the internet back then to ask for guidance), so I always left them as they came in the box. But this week I had a couple of days off, I was helping my daughter to paint some cheap plastic soldiers for her homework, and I just got carried away and started to read about how to paint the game's minis properly and simple (where I live I cannot get the brands of paint most speciallized model painters on these forums use, so I had to make sure that even with common primers and acryllics I could get decent results).

So far I've finshed with the heroes, trying to keep them similar to the game's cards. It only took me a couple of days from start to finish (I was doing other things meanwhile, I work fast and I'm used at craftmaking, so I'd say it was just around 6 hours total not counting drying times)









I'm doing the zombies next.

edited for some typos and a missing sentence.
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Brandon Alderman
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How have you stored them?
 
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Mauricio Montoya
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Ok, zombies are done!


Green zombie before staining


And after

I stained the zombies wit a simple wash of black acrylic paint dissolved in two parts of water, it gives them a dirty look that fits them. On the heroes I used the same techinque but used a more diluted wash, that caused shadows and lines but didn't make them look so dirty.

I tried to keep the colors consistent to avoid confusion while playing... Brown zombies all have brown bases and shirts, and the same for the green ones. I only did color variatins on the pants, undershirts and hair.

Now, let's have some fun at the radio station:







@Alderdust
I store them on the game box... on the small slot I put all the zombies, and on the big slot I put the dice and the heroes in their original baggies, and the big roud markers in a small ziplock bag. Over all that goes the sun marker, the center square and the "L" sections, and in the hole formed by the L sections I put all the small markers in anther bag. I gave all the figures a few layers of matte finish, so while they are all tangled together when stored, I don't have to push or force them to fit in there, and I think the paint will be OK.
 
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Neil Edmonds
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Well done. Your dip method turned out really well and I bet it saved you a lot of painting time. It takes me about 6 hours to paint a figure at this point.

One technique I use is an eye dropper full of water to thin the paints out. It helps a lot.
 
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Mauricio Montoya
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I use a wet palette when working with acrylic paints... You take a shallow dish or plate and put two wet paper towels in it (cut them if they don't fit), over those you put a piece of bond paper, like the one used for photocopiers, or a blank page torn from a notebook. The towels have to be wet enough so that the top paper layer get a little moist but without being covered in water also.

You can then pour and mix your paints over the top paper layer (it won't break if it's heavy duty paper) and the moistness form the paper towels underneath will keep the paints from drying without watering them down.

You can vary the thinness of the paint just by pushing a little with the brush when you scoop it, and you don't have to rush because the tone you just got mixed isn't gonna dry after just a few minutes (if you keep adding a few drops of water to the towels so they don't get dry, you can have the paint on there for hours at a time).


Ugly example attached
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