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Subject: 3 questions on generals rss

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Hello all

I've two questions regarding generals:

1) Under 7.31 (C ) it says "Neither side can inflict casualties in excess of twice its own strength. Exception: An ungarrisoned coastal fort can cause a maximum of 1 SP of damage even though it counts as zero SPs." What happens when a general is left with 0 SPs in a non-coastal fort? I understand this to count as 0 SP as well, but should it be treated like in the exception above for battle purposes?

2) When two cavalry brigades are stacked together, both in the case of no SPs and SPs being present, how do you treat them when conducting, respectively, a cavalry retreat or a discretionary retreat? Should only one of the generals be treated as a sort of commanding general and move the whole force? If yes, can the player choose the general? If not, and in the case of no SPs (cavalry retreat), can the two brigades retreat to two different places?

3) [Addendum] When intercepting into a friendly space with general(s), what defense rating should I use (apart from the +2 corresponding to the successful intervention). Example: Longstreet (political=2; defense=3) successfully intercepts a space being attacked where Beauregard (political=5; defense=1) is stationed with a bunch of SPs. So, at the outset Longstreet is conducting the intervention but theoretically Beau should be in command of the corps in that space at the moment of the battle due to higher political ranking. My guess is that Longstreet would be the "active" general and should be in command during the battle, right? Further, are you supposed to use all the SPs present in the space, or only those coming with the intercepting force (Longstreet's SPs alone in the example above)?


Thanks!
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Any charitable soul out there? I'd really appreciate some feedback on this. Thank you.
 
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Kris Van Beurden
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1) Spirit of the rules would probably be to allow it in the exception ... however, the rules as written seem not to mention this. But why would the note of 5.34 (Note: Forts are zero SPs and can support one general) exist if this was not the idea?

2) cavalry retreat: I think both could retreat "alone" (although it depends on the exact meaning of "solely by a" in the sentence: When an Army, Corps, Division, or Cavalry Brigade moves to enter a space occupied solely by a
Cavalry Brigade, then the Cavalry Brigade may automatically retreat before battle (if desired).). Maybe once there are TWO cavalry brigades, they lose this flexibility? Good question, I don't know the answer. Personally, I'd rule both can retreta, to different places.
Discretionary retreat: I would say one of the generals can be chosen to retreat the entire force. Usually, I'd expect a "normal" general to be there, who would have to make the roll.

3) Beauregard should do this. It's not your action so you don't have an active general. You have to treat the intercepting force as if it was in the space all along (so, merge it with any existing force ... merging 2 armies into one if necessary).
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Very helpful, my feelings on 1) and 2) were just like yours, 3) however was a bit of a puzzle as I was not sure who the CG would be, since the one doing the interception seemed to me to be 'active'. Thank you!
 
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Kris Van Beurden
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For '3', see rule 5.31 Corps command.

When there is an active general (the one who is in the process of moving), the active general is in command. When no generals are active, then the general with the highest political rating is in command. [...] The distinction of being in command when inactive is important for interception [...]During play the composition of a space will change due to movement, interceptions, and retreats. Consequently, the general with the highest political rating is likely to change over the course of a turn.
 
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My understanding of 5.31 regarding interceptions is that when, e.g., two generals are stacked with a bunch of SPs it's always the HP general who is in charge and can go for the interception, not the one of your choosing.

I don't see the relation with our discussion in point 3) above. I think you'd made a clearer point when saying that once the interception is done all forces merge and the generals remain 'inactive' and prepared for battle. Thus, Beauregard in the example above should be in command, not Longstreet, provided that the latter has successfully intercepted.
 
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Kris Van Beurden
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Oh, you intercept with the one you choose (you just can't take higher PR generals with you).

What I meant quoting that rule was that *on arrival* it is again the highest PR general who takes command.


So, if you have Beau & Longstreet in a space, Longstreet would be able to intercept but without Beau (leaving Beau with at least 1 SP).
If Longstreet intercepts into Beau's space, then Beau would take command over Longstreet.
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Tegarend wrote:
So, if you have Beau & Longstreet in a space, Longstreet would be able to intercept but without Beau (leaving Beau with at least 1 SP).


I think this is wrong, at least, that's what I've been told in the past. If you have Beau & Longstreet in a space then Beau is always the CG while both are inactive. Therefore, you CAN'T try intercepting with Longstreet, only Beau. That's precisely the point made in 5.31. [The distinction of being in command when inactive is important for interception]. Moreover, in a successful interception the whole force must move, not part of it, with some exceptions. As per 5.81, these exceptions occur when departing from a fort (you can leave 1 SP behind), when SPs are in excess of movement restrictions of the unit involved, and when 5.29 & 5.34 restrictions apply.

Tegarend wrote:
If Longstreet intercepts into Beau's space, then Beau would take command over Longstreet.


This is where my question mark was, and where you had it right.

Do you agree?
 
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Kris Van Beurden
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You are right!
 
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