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1846: The Race for the Midwest» Forums » Rules

Subject: End game scoring rss

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Laurent Harvent
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Let me begin with a brief introduction. Untill this day I have played only five games of Poseidon 1800 B.C., I'm finishing my own copy of 18AL and I just read several different rulebook, like 1830, 1860, 1846 and 1889.

I have a question about the final scoring of an 18XX game. For each Corporation, players calculate their score like this:
[Market Value] x [Number of Shares]
Then they add the amount of personnal cash and eventualy the Par Value on any Private Company. This method is the only one used for every 18XX?

I ask the question because of 1846… In that particular game, the end scoring seems different. In the example before, the [Market Value] x [Number of Shares] is remplaced by something more complex :
[(OR1)+(OR2)+(Market Value)] x [Number of Shares]

Why this is different with 1846? Why the gains of the last Operating Rounds are included? Why not use the final Market Value? Or am I understanding wrong?
 
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Eric Brosius
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My favorite 18xx game for six players is two games of 1846 with three players each.
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It is no different in 1846: The Race for the Midwest.

What the rule section you quote is describing is how you don't have to hand out dividends to players in the final set of two ORs. Instead, you can simply add the dividends for those final two ORs to the market values.

This eliminates a lot of money handling.
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Laurent Harvent
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I still does not understand, especially while looking at the table at page 9 of the rulebook.

I understand the classic way to do as follow: The money gained on ORs is added to cash on hand. Then I multiply the Stock Value with number of shares.
Cash (gained through all ORs) + [# Shares x Market Value]
The last two ORs are added once.

But in the example, the last two ORs are not simply added to cash but multiplied by the number of shares. In the table page 9, what I see is this:
Cash (gained through all but two lasts ORs) + [# Shares x [Market Value + OR1 + OR2]]
The last two ORs are added X times, X is the # of shares.


 
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Dan Blum
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The value earned PER SHARE in each OR is added to the market value and multiplied by the number of shares.
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Laurent Harvent
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Of course! I feel stupid… All is clear now.

Thank you both.
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Brett Cizmar
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Summerland
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I was scratching my head over this one too. I see now though the dividend values aren't being added to the "Stock Market Value" as much as they are just being multiplied by your shares to calculate the additional income gained for on hand cash. (and as previous posters mentioned I imagine this removes a lot of unnecessary shifting about of money)
 
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John Perry
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I also had some hesitation with this example. I see that they are simply lumping the dividend payout per share with the per share price to then multiple by the number of shares owned by each player, but does this not then ignore the potential stock value increases that would occur in the 1 or 2 ORs if the full payout had been made.

Or, when just calculating (spreadsheeting)out the remaining ORs after bank breaking, do people often stop tracking stock value bumps?

edit: perhaps the stock value being considered already account for the required increases?
 
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Tom Lehmann
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Coxeter wrote:
perhaps the stock value being considered already account for the required increases?

Correct.

In practice when spreadsheeting the final round, each President says something like "The IC runs for 72, which is a double jump." and moves the IC stock marker two spots. The person doing the spreadsheet notes "72" next to IC for the first OR.

After finishing both ORs, you now have two columns of payouts. A player then reads off the *final* stock values, which are added to the payouts to get the value per share of each share of stock for a RR, exactly as shown.
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John Perry
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Thank you for the reply. I have only played a couple learning games, but i am really enjoying your game.
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Christopher Giroir
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I use this sheet I made: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/14C01Ec6wb_SHlwpeEA71...

Basically one tab per round (unless we get an emergency train buy) to help us payout and keep track of worth throughout the game.
 
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