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Subject: New Brunswick rss

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Andrew MacLeod
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I suppose this is more of a "general" question rather than a "rules" question.

I can't believe I've never noticed this before: New Brunswick appears to have two areas in it, the box-thingy that's actually labelled "New Brunswick" and is classified as a minor city; and Saint John (erroneously labelled "St. Johns" on the map) which is a settled area. So are these actually two separate areas? If so, it's exceedingly weird that "New Brunswick" is the minor city, since Saint John was the economic centre of New Brunswick and certainly the most populated area in that colony.

Does this matter at all practically? In an exceedingly minor way. Up until now, I had thought British units in New Brunswick just moved out to sea if the British wanted to do that; but if Saint John is a separate area from New Brunswick, then they'd have to go to Saint John first. Perhaps a tad more important, it slows down any British overland expedition marching into New England from New Brunswick by two movement points.
 
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Kevin McPartland
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The historic map that we used for the backround of the game map labels the place "St. Johns". Check out this link:

http://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~22...

This means either that the town used to be called this, or that we are perpetuating a 200 year old mistake. (That's what we did with "Ithica" New York.) blush

Yes, New Brunswick has two areas. The part labeled St. Johns includes St. John and part of the Bay of Fundy coast. The part labeled New Brunswick includes all of the rest of the province. That's why we put the "minor city" there: it includes Moncton, Fredericton (and the rest of the settled interior), and the entire Gulf of Saint Lawrence coast, from Campbellton to Shediac. Prince Edward Island is also thrown into either that part of New Brunswick and/or Nova Scotia.

As far as movement, please refer to rules section 6.7 Sea Movement, second paragraph: "New Brunswick may be accessed by sea, or by land from St. John... All of these are in the North Atlantic Sea Zone."

Note that the rules doesn't have the "s" added.

Kevin

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Andrew MacLeod
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Ah yes! "Ithica"! I had forgotten all about that!

Saint John has been called "Saint John" since it was incorporated as a city in 1785. The locals (of which I am not one) are very touchy about getting the name right. Back in the 80's, a large crowd in Saint John booed Prince Charles as he gave a speech where he referred to the city as "Saint Johns". So while the map does perpetuate a 200 year old mistake, at least you're in royal company!

KMcPartland wrote:

Yes, New Brunswick has two areas. The part labeled St. Johns includes St. John and part of the Bay of Fundy coast. The part labeled New Brunswick includes all of the rest of the province. That's why we put the "minor city" there: it includes Moncton, Fredericton (and the rest of the settled interior), and the entire Gulf of Saint Lawrence coast, from Campbellton to Shediac. Prince Edward Island is also thrown into either that part of New Brunswick and/or Nova Scotia.


I get ya. Nevertheless, at the time, Saint John "the settled area" was bigger than Kingston, Upper Canada, which the game shows as a major city.

KMcPartland wrote:
As far as movement, please refer to rules section 6.7 Sea Movement, second paragraph: "New Brunswick may be accessed by sea, or by land from St. John... All of these are in the North Atlantic Sea Zone."


Yeah (idiot that I am), those words never really sank in for me until today.

KMcPartland wrote:
Note that the rules doesn't have the "s" added.


One can't help but admire a geographically correct rulebook!
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Kevin McPartland
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Quote:
... at least you're in royal company!

Royal company... but did it have to be Prince Charles?

Quote:
Nevertheless, at the time, Saint John "the settled area" was bigger than Kingston, Upper Canada, which the game shows as a major city.

Well, don't forget the game purposes of cities: raising troops, calling out Local Militia, and Peace Track objectives. So the city size was not really based on the population of the city, more based on those other factors. Kingston was a major stated objective of the Americans, and thus worth a Peace Track move if they get it. New Brunswick was never an objective. We made it as big as we could, without making it an important target.

Quote:
One can't help but admire a geographically correct rulebook!

And what I thought really stood out was the lack of consistency. blush

Kevin
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Andrew MacLeod
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KMcPartland wrote:

Well, don't forget the game purposes of cities: raising troops, calling out Local Militia, and Peace Track objectives. So the city size was not really based on the population of the city, more based on those other factors. Kingston was a major stated objective of the Americans, and thus worth a Peace Track move if they get it. New Brunswick was never an objective. We made it as big as we could, without making it an important target.


Indeed: and the underlined is why I figured Kingston could be labelled a Major City, and New Brunswick a Minor City.

However, I suspect that Kingston may have been able to raise more troops because it was a target of the Americans rather than anything else. If New Brunswick had been an invasion goal, it probably would have seen a heck of a lot more recruits raised than it actually did.

Being a target of aggression is a wonderful inducement to enlist, or to take other action. Take New Brunswick (again), for example: in the 1860's, when the British North American colonies began to confederate into what is now Canada, two of the three Maritime colonies (Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island to be specific) were overwhelmingly opposed to the confederation idea. New Brunswick, however, was largely in favour. Why? Because it was experiencing attacks by Fenian guerrillas from the USA (which Nova Scotia and PEI weren't) and saw the advantages of a continent-wide defence system. Without the Fenian attacks, Canada (I would argue) would not have come into existence.

My apologies: I blather on......
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