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DreadBall: The Futuristic Sports Game» Forums » General

Subject: Seeking advice on preparing the minis for play rss

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MC Crispy
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I'm a complete noob to miniatures-based gaming. I've been thinking of investing in Blood Bowl for some time, but then a sweet deal came up on DreadBall: The Futuristic Sports Game at BoardGameGuru and I bit. So now I have a problem: I have six teams to assemble and make presentable for playing. I'd like your advice on the following:

(1) Assembling the minis
(2) Priming the minis
(3) Approaches to dealing with the bases
(4) Identifying (numbering?) the team members

thanks folks.
 
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Lee Wygant
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I may be able to give some friendly advice.


1. With a sharp xacto knife remove all flash from the figures. Take your time with this as it will pay big dividends. If you find flash after priming and have to go back at the figure it wastes time

2. Wash the figures in soapy water, better is to scrub them lightly with a toothbrush. (I tend to dump them in the sink and swish them around for awhile). This removes all mold release from the figs so the primer sticks well. Let dry

3. Test fit the figs. I had to do a little trimming with an xacto blade to make sure the figs go together easily. Better to do this before they are painted.

3a. Many assemble their figs at this point. If the arms or heads get in the way of detail work on the fig I usually superglue the arms to toothpicks and paint them separately, then attach the fig before shading and drybrushing. Another option is to paint the bodies, attach the limbs, and paint the limbs.

3. Prime with spray primer. Most go with white or black based on how much of the figure will require white underneath bright colors compared to how much of the figure will be black.

4. ARMY PAINTER spray paints if you have a large area to cover with one color. Trontek is a good example their black spray with matching paint works great if you are a sloppy painter. An example : Trontek as shown is all dark with a few area's of light. Prime black, Army painter BLACK all the figs, white paint on areas that need lighter colors (reds, yellows). Highlight, wash, paint in lighter colors, done.
Also ARMY PAINTER has some colors that may work for a team right from the start - Doing Forgefathers in blue, look at their blue, then you only have the detail colors to actually paint.

5. Detach bases, wash as well. I primed mine black, then used GW Incubus something paint (matches the board pretty well). I then painted the front of 3 hexes of each base white, then over that did a color scheme of Green for Strikers, Yellow for Jacks, Red for Guards. (when explaining the rules it works really well to use a stoplight analogy)

Green GO Strikers
Yellow - jacks
Red STOP Guards

Also it lets you identify your opponents threats just as easily (where are his guards?)

Some are leaving their bases clear but highlighting the edges in a neon color and painting the 3 hex faces of the threat zones so they are easily visible.

Most are looking for transfer sheets (decals) to label their teams and some are also labeling the bases as well with larger matching numbers(hard to see the ones on the back of smaller figures)

If you go to the Mantic Dreadball forums you can find conversations on numbers and sources for them.

If you do not use a wet pallet I highly recommend it. A quick google will find many easy ways to make one. You can quickly switch between colors without opening a bottle each time and you can store them for a long time sealed in a fridge.

Lastly, paint to play, not to get frustrated. Painting is a skill that takes time and you should really not let it bog you down. I myself get sucked into OCD-land where I start touching up the undersides of the figs or where seams meet. This is the path to doubling the time your figs stay on your bench and are not on a gaming table.

A wash tends to blend those seams anyway, so just concentrate on getting the paint in the right places and as your skill grows the faster it will go.

Sincerely,
Lee
Manager of Orx & Goblins, Humans, and Veer-myn teams

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Jeff Kayati
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Assembling the mini's requires superglue. Due to the nature of the plastic, the mold lines that are on them can be difficult to remove scraping with an exacto knife, so a small file might be needed. It depends on how exacting you want to be.

The clear bases will cloud up if you use superglue, so white glue is suggested. If you want to keep the clear bases for the board, you'll need to prime the figures, and probably paint them, before you glue them to the clear bases. It's easier to assemble and play with the figures before priming and painting, which is the course I've taken. I'll just paint the bases when the time comes.

Numbering can be done on the base, rear side. Or, on the figure itself. A find brush and a steady hand can do a decent job.

Check out the Mantic site, in particular the forums for more info.

www.manticgames.com
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Lee Wardle
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Quote:
Lastly, paint to play, not to get frustrated. Painting is a skill that takes time and you should really not let it bog you down.


Amazing advice! I tend to stop painting while I am still enjoying it; this leaves me wanting to do it again later rather than hating the sight of my brush.

 
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Graeme McGee
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If you want to get playing ASAP I recommend painting the inside of the bases red, yellow and green. Also a Pigma brush pen(pictured at the bottom) is really handy for stuff like numbers.

Also, I have just blu-tacked the figs to the bases for now as I didn't want to paint them after gluing.

Prepare yourself for a bit of a slog, but it is worth it. The game is a lot of fun.
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MC Crispy
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Folks this is all really useful information. Thank you.

I want to balance a desire to play with painted minis against a desire to play the game NOW. Are there any suggestions for effective-looking minimalist paint jobs? (though recognisable team colours are important)

On the basing aspect, I like the RAG role-identifying idea, along with a numbered base. That all makes a great deal of sense. I need to find a way that preserves an essentially clear base as I think I prefer that.

@jkayati: does the base-clouding issue matter if the base is painted anyway? Does the cloudiness spread outside of contact areas? And what do you mean by "white glue"? PVA? But PVA doesn't set clear, so how is that better?
 
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Jeff Kayati
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mccrispy wrote:
@jkayati: does the base-clouding issue matter if the base is painted anyway? Does the cloudiness spread outside of contact areas? And what do you mean by "white glue"? PVA? But PVA doesn't set clear, so how is that better?


If the base is painted, it won't matter a bit. The cloudiness will vary, but it is likely to spread outside the contact area. In the States, I can get "white glue" that dries clear. No idea what it is called, or if it's available, in the UK.
 
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MC Crispy
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jkayati wrote:
mccrispy wrote:
@jkayati: does the base-clouding issue matter if the base is painted anyway? Does the cloudiness spread outside of contact areas? And what do you mean by "white glue"? PVA? But PVA doesn't set clear, so how is that better?


If the base is painted, it won't matter a bit. The cloudiness will vary, but it is likely to spread outside the contact area. In the States, I can get "white glue" that dries clear. No idea what it is called, or if it's available, in the UK.
Hmmm... a bit of research is called for I think. I'll do some digging. BTW, I don't suppose that your pot says anywhere what type of glue it is (safety info or something)?
 
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Jonah Rees
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mccrispy wrote:
jkayati wrote:
mccrispy wrote:
@jkayati: does the base-clouding issue matter if the base is painted anyway? Does the cloudiness spread outside of contact areas? And what do you mean by "white glue"? PVA? But PVA doesn't set clear, so how is that better?


If the base is painted, it won't matter a bit. The cloudiness will vary, but it is likely to spread outside the contact area. In the States, I can get "white glue" that dries clear. No idea what it is called, or if it's available, in the UK.
Hmmm... a bit of research is called for I think. I'll do some digging. BTW, I don't suppose that your pot says anywhere what type of glue it is (safety info or something)?


PVA glue will dry clear so it's probably the UK equivalent. Personally I would use superglue as it's more secure, just be very careful with it and only put a small drop in the middle of the base to avoid misting.
 
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MC Crispy
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jonahmaul wrote:
mccrispy wrote:
jkayati wrote:
mccrispy wrote:
@jkayati: does the base-clouding issue matter if the base is painted anyway? Does the cloudiness spread outside of contact areas? And what do you mean by "white glue"? PVA? But PVA doesn't set clear, so how is that better?


If the base is painted, it won't matter a bit. The cloudiness will vary, but it is likely to spread outside the contact area. In the States, I can get "white glue" that dries clear. No idea what it is called, or if it's available, in the UK.
Hmmm... a bit of research is called for I think. I'll do some digging. BTW, I don't suppose that your pot says anywhere what type of glue it is (safety info or something)?


PVA glue will dry clear so it's probably the UK equivalent. Personally I would use superglue as it's more secure, just be very careful with it and only put a small drop in the middle of the base to avoid misting.
hmmm... I guess if the layer of PVA is thin enough it set clear. Why do you need the greater security of superglue? PVA is pretty darn tough (holds my furniture together after all)
 
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Jonah Rees
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I just prefer superglue as it creates a stronger bond. But that's personal preference, nothing to stop you using PVA if you prefer it (and if you already have it I certainly wouldn't purchase super glue especially).
 
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MC Crispy
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jonahmaul wrote:
I just prefer superglue as it creates a stronger bond. But that's personal preference, nothing to stop you using PVA if you prefer it (and if you already have it I certainly wouldn't purchase super glue especially).
I strongly suspect that both PVA and superglue form a bond that exceeds the strength of the material bonded. It is therefore a moot point as to which produces the stronger bond. It's not really so important to form the strongest bond, I want to choose the best glue for the job - one that is sufficiently strong for the purpose and produces a result that leaves me with the most options. For further processes. So the bonded items must be largely unaffected and the join "invisible". It would be great if the glue was easy to handle and could bond with a small surface area. Superglue certainly fits the bill for gluing the mini together (PVA wouldn't be strong enough for small bonding surfaces), but I'm still not sure that I want to cover the hex base in paint, so it's not right for the basing job. Trouble is, I'm not sure whether PVA is either
 
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Jonah Rees
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mccrispy wrote:
jonahmaul wrote:
I just prefer superglue as it creates a stronger bond. But that's personal preference, nothing to stop you using PVA if you prefer it (and if you already have it I certainly wouldn't purchase super glue especially).
I strongly suspect that both PVA and superglue form a bond that exceeds the strength of the material bonded. It is therefore a moot point as to which produces the stronger bond. It's not really so important to form the strongest bond, I want to choose the best glue for the job - one that is sufficiently strong for the purpose and produces a result that leaves me with the most options. For further processes. So the bonded items must be largely unaffected and the join "invisible". It would be great if the glue was easy to handle and could bond with a small surface area. Superglue certainly fits the bill for gluing the mini together (PVA wouldn't be strong enough for small bonding surfaces), but I'm still not sure that I want to cover the hex base in paint, so it's not right for the basing job. Trouble is, I'm not sure whether PVA is either


The bond you would get from PVA isn't particularly strong and you could break it off quite easily. It is probably stronger on wood because it is more of a porous surface. If you have both I would say try them both out and see which you're most comfortable with. If you're not planning on painting the bases then you do need to be a lot more careful with superglue. However, even if you mess some up replacement bases don't cost too much so it wouldn't be the end of the world.
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MC Crispy
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jonahmaul wrote:
mccrispy wrote:
jonahmaul wrote:
I just prefer superglue as it creates a stronger bond. But that's personal preference, nothing to stop you using PVA if you prefer it (and if you already have it I certainly wouldn't purchase super glue especially).
I strongly suspect that both PVA and superglue form a bond that exceeds the strength of the material bonded. It is therefore a moot point as to which produces the stronger bond. It's not really so important to form the strongest bond, I want to choose the best glue for the job - one that is sufficiently strong for the purpose and produces a result that leaves me with the most options. For further processes. So the bonded items must be largely unaffected and the join "invisible". It would be great if the glue was easy to handle and could bond with a small surface area. Superglue certainly fits the bill for gluing the mini together (PVA wouldn't be strong enough for small bonding surfaces), but I'm still not sure that I want to cover the hex base in paint, so it's not right for the basing job. Trouble is, I'm not sure whether PVA is either


The bond you would get from PVA isn't particularly strong and you could break it off quite easily. It is probably stronger on wood because it is more of a porous surface. If you have both I would say try them both out and see which you're most comfortable with. If you're not planning on painting the bases then you do need to be a lot more careful with superglue. However, even if you mess some up replacement bases don't cost too much so it wouldn't be the end of the world.
I had one further thought: I could use a small drop of superglue (to minimise the spread of "misting" and paint the figure's number in an appropriate colour disk immediately under the base. Then limited misting wouldn't be an issue and I could tell useful info about a fallen figure, even from the "wrong" side.
 
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