Recommend
13 
 Thumb up
 Hide
33 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » General Gaming

Subject: Essen 2013: Are we way overdue for a new mechanic? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
linoleum blownaparte
United States
Unspecified
Unspecified
flag msg tools
mbmb
Top-5 most influential games of the last decade? If you put a gun to my head, I'd say:

Puerto Rico (2002) - variable role/phase selection
Caylus (2005) - worker placement
Agricola (2007) - worker placement
Pandemic (2008) - cooperative gaming revival (could substitute Space Alert or perhaps Shadows Over Camelot)
Dominion (2008) - deck building

These aren't my five favorite games, but these five were progenitors for dozens of descendants & imitators which tweaked or developed the central innovation. Many of those "descendant" games grace the top 100 games today.

2002-2008 (six years) was a golden age of innovation.

In 2009-2013 (five years) there has not been a truly new, truly innovative game mechanic that took the boardgame world by storm and influenced dozens of new games.

In fact most of the most-popular games since 2008 are worker placement or deck building games: The Castles Of Burgundy, Tzolk'in, Dominant Species, Ora et Labora, Lords Of Waterdeep, Trajan, Mage Knight, Robinson Crusoe, etc. The post-2008 hit game with the most original central mechanic is probably 7 Wonders (2010) with its simultaneous card drafting, but 7 Wonders hasn't had many imitators/descendants.

So:

Are we overdue for a brand new mechanic?

Do you think we'll see one at this year's Essen? Is there a particular game on your radar?

When you hear that a new 2013 game is a deckbuilder or worker-placement, are you intrigued, turned off, or neutral?
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ryan S
United States
Plano
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
What!? I finally get my very own video game, but it's a mobile game?!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm always interested to see new mechanics and ideas.

Last night I played Boss Monster: The Dungeon Building Card Game for the first time, and I was pleasantly surprised by how different it felt from other card games I've played. I'm not even sure how I'd describe it, but you have to compete with other players to lure in heroes so that you can destroy them in your dungeon of traps and monster rooms. Each turn you can enhance your dungeon slightly, and use spells to do various things which affect you or your opponents.

That being said, I think people enjoy familiarity. It's a lot easier to introduce a new game to a play group if you say "it plays kind of like a tile placement game mixed with a worker placement game."

edit: I just realized I didn't answer your last questions.

1.) I think we get new mechanics or fresh ideas pretty often.

2.) I don't have any particular games I'm looking forward to at the moment.

3.) I'm interested in new games with familiar mechanics, so long as the theme interests me. I love deck building games, so I'm always open to more of those.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Victor van Santen
Germany
Karlsruhe
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I would say its more than just a new mechanic. Even the fresh and intelligent use of available mechanics can sometimes change everything.

Hanabi for example uses no new mechanic, yet still feels very new and fresh.

I currently enjoy the small changes to existing mechanics, which hopefully will get re-used in games with similar mechanics.

For example the use of numbers under resources to show your current production is something which is widely used in Eclipse and I hope this gets copied by almost any resource game. I don't ever want to count my income from 20 markers and 4 different places again (like in Sid Meier's Civilization: The Board Game).

So elegance and fine tuning of existing mechanics, which have proven itself over time, is more important for me than new mechanics.

New Mechanics are not necessarily good. They may seem fresh, but in their raw form are often clunky and unpolished (because it is the first installment of these new mechanics). Furthermore some mechanics are just obsolete and unnecessary, e.g. Player Eliminition is an old mechanic which is completely obsolete in my eyes.

But if someone invents a new "holy grail" of mechanics I'll be glad to play and buy that game!
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Buckley
England
Bath
Somerset
flag msg tools
23rd June: Black Thursday :(
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Linoleumblownaparte wrote:
Top-5 most influential games of the last decade? If you put a gun to my head, I'd say:

Puerto Rico (2002) - variable role/phase selection
Caylus (2005) - worker placement
Agricola (2007) - worker placement
Pandemic (2008) - cooperative gaming revival (could substitute Space Alert or perhaps Shadows Over Camelot)
Dominion (2008) - deck building

These aren't my five favorite games, but these five were progenitors for dozens of descendants & imitators which tweaked or developed the central innovation. Many of those "descendant" games grace the top 100 games today.

2002-2008 (six years) was a golden age of innovation.

In 2009-2013 (five years) there has not been a truly new, truly innovative game mechanic that took the boardgame world by storm and influenced dozens of new games.

In fact most of the most-popular games since 2008 are worker placement or deck building games: The Castles Of Burgundy, Tzolk'in, Dominant Species, Ora et Labora, Lords Of Waterdeep, Trajan, Mage Knight, Robinson Crusoe, etc. The post-2008 hit game with the most original central mechanic is probably 7 Wonders (2010) with its simultaneous card drafting, but 7 Wonders hasn't had many imitators/descendants.

[/b]


There are a couple of points here that I disagree with.

(1) 7 wonders has one very significant descendent: Magic: The Gathering. A popular tournament format involves building a deck out of cards drafted by a method that is exactly like that used by 7 wonders.

(2) The Castles of Burgandy and Tzolk'in are not worker placement games.

Also +1 for applauding Hanabi as a new and fresh design.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
George I.
Switzerland
Zurich
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
At one point, one can expect that new mechanisms will start saturating. What's more important, for me, is how can a game blend together familiar and simple mechanisms and create something unique?

An example would be A Castle for All Seasons. It's a blend of worker placement game (place meeples on resource cards & end-game scoring spots) and role-selection / variable phase order, like Citadels. Although none of its mechanics is new, it creates something unique and integrates greatly in the game.

Another one, mentioned earlier, is Hanabi. Doesn't add anything new, in terms of mechanics, but it feels "unique".

So, creating a unique combination of simple, familiar mechanics, which also integrates well in a game, is far more important for me than having new complex mechanisms. Sure, mechanics like Leacock's "Epidemic" mechanism have been a breakthrough, but that's once every X years...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
linoleum blownaparte
United States
Unspecified
Unspecified
flag msg tools
mbmb
Picon wrote:
At one point, one can expect that new mechanisms will start saturating. What's more important, for me, is how can a game blend together familiar and simple mechanisms and create something unique?


I'd rather say that in the lifespan of any mechanism, implementations of it start saturating and it becomes difficult to create a meaningfully unique version of that mechanic. This happens faster and more often than new mechanisms are invented.

Lots of games used to have combat resolution tables (CRT) until that grew very stale. The world didn't need one additional, subtly different CRT game, it needed We the People and Wallenstein (first edition).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kaiwen Zhang
Canada
Montreal
Quebec
flag msg tools
Welcome to Zombo.com!
badge
Art of life
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The new mechanic of 2013 is persistent deckbuilding presented by Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords – Base Set. Instead of making deckbuilding the game itself like in Dominion, deckbuilding is used to improve the same deck over several plays. And unlike traditional CCGs, acquiring cards is regulated by the game itself so you can't choose from the entire pool of cards.

This mechanic is really easy to integrate with almost any style and theme of games so I predict there will be many clones of Pathfinder in the near future. Existing games such as Mage Knight Board Game can easily be house-ruled as well to introduce persistent deckbuilding.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Christina Crouch
United Kingdom
Tadley
Hampshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
What about Risk Legacy and the other games in which you shape future games that I think will follow it?
26 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Board WithLife
United States
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
malibu_babe_28 wrote:
What about Risk Legacy and the other games in which you shape future games that I think will follow it?

Yup!
In our estimation RISK Legacy was the first shot fired in the next revolution. Really curious abut SeaFall...
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Samo Oleami
Slovenia
Ljubljana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
1) Mechanics fetishism died out. New mechanic for new mechanics sake and that kind of stuff.
2) Theme is the new mechanics. Euros are coming out with better theme implementation and original topics (which was caused by Kickstarter as it made possible to produce the games with themes publishers didn't dare to touch).
3) The new trend in mechanistics seems to be piling mechanics over mechanics over mechanics. Look it's area control + drafting + set collecting + worker placement + has dice. Wheee. Basically euro are becoming ameritrashy, only with less theme.
3.1) A special branch is clockwork design - oh how neat all these (unoriginal) pieces work together.
4) Old mechanics used in new design approaches like: victory point salad games. It's like worker placement, only gentler and milder.
5) Even lighter games are becoming more gamier - there's more stuff that keeps you focused on the game, instead of people. (Libertalia, even Love Letter).

So things are definitely changing.

Quote:
Hanabi for example uses no new mechanic, yet still feels very new and fresh.


What about turning the hand of cards around, so only other players see it?
What about combining cooperative games with deduction than manages to create a non confrontational double think game?
Both are these are very unique, and the latter in particular is an achievemnt.
Maybe your idea of mechanics is too narrow?

Quote:
Puerto Rico (2002) - variable role/phase selection
Caylus (2005) - worker placement
Agricola (2007) - worker placement
Pandemic (2008) - cooperative gaming revival (could substitute Space Alert or perhaps Shadows Over Camelot)
Dominion (2008) - deck building

I think these could also be seen as progression, rather than straight innovations.

Role selection came from Verrater to Citadels to Puerto Rico. And from here on came worker placements. As worker placement and role selection and drafting share a similar core which is "action selection" - you pick something you wish to do and then other players can't choose it (though sometimes they can leech). It can be done with cards which allow for variety and hidden information or it can be done on a board with placing meeples for a more thinky situation.

Dominion takes action selection and turns it into (solitarish) engine building.

Buckersuk wrote:
(1) 7 wonders has one very significant descendent: Magic: The Gathering. A popular tournament format involves building a deck out of cards drafted by a method that is exactly like that used by 7 wonders.

I've played in MtG drafting tournaments 13 years before 7 wonders came out. And 7 wonders ain't the first euro to feature drafting - Fairy Tale came before (and maybe other games I don't know about).

But the way 7 wonders uses drafting combined with engine building is closely related to idea of worker placement, only that here you have bigger variety (you get 7 actions, pick one, give 6 actions to another player).

malibu_babe_28 wrote:
What about Risk Legacy and the other games in which you shape future games that I think will follow it?

This IS interesting. I think I seen a card game of this type in the playtesting on some report from a convention.
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David P
Canada
Vancouver
BC
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Basically euro are becoming ameritrashy, only with less theme.


I hadn't thought of it that way, but I can't say I disagree (as an analysis of broad trends). I would also agree that Hanabi feels fresh because it does something entirely new (without becoming "ameritrashy, only with less theme") whereas most euros recycle old ideas.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Buckley
England
Bath
Somerset
flag msg tools
23rd June: Black Thursday :(
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Linoleumblownaparte wrote:
Top-5 most influential games of the last decade? If you put a gun to my head, I'd say:

Puerto Rico (2002) - variable role/phase selection
Caylus (2005) - worker placement
Agricola (2007) - worker placement
Pandemic (2008) - cooperative gaming revival (could substitute Space Alert or perhaps Shadows Over Camelot)
Dominion (2008) - deck building

These aren't my five favorite games, but these five were progenitors for dozens of descendants & imitators which tweaked or developed the central innovation. Many of those "descendant" games grace the top 100 games today.

2002-2008 (six years) was a golden age of innovation.

In 2009-2013 (five years) there has not been a truly new, truly innovative game mechanic that took the boardgame world by storm and influenced dozens of new games.

In fact most of the most-popular games since 2008 are worker placement or deck building games: The Castles Of Burgundy, Tzolk'in, Dominant Species, Ora et Labora, Lords Of Waterdeep, Trajan, Mage Knight, Robinson Crusoe, etc. The post-2008 hit game with the most original central mechanic is probably 7 Wonders (2010) with its simultaneous card drafting, but 7 Wonders hasn't had many imitators/descendants.

So:

Are we overdue for a brand new mechanic?


The more I think about this the more I think the answer is no, not really. Castles of Burgandy, Tzolkin', Village and (from what I've heard) Trajan, all introduced original (to me at least) mechanics. Albeit these games are all action based points salads, so didn't feel all that innovative despite the new mechanics.

Further evidence that 2008-2013 have not wanted for innovation: Imperial, Macao, King of Tokyo,
Coup, the aformentioned Hanabi and, appropriately enough, Innovation.

Quote:
Do you think we'll see one at this year's Essen? Is there a particular game on your radar?


I haven't looked. I'm a long, long way off exhausting all that the
already published games have to offer.

Quote:
When you hear that a new 2013 game is a deckbuilder or worker-placement, are you intrigued, turned off, or neutral?


It certainly wouldn't colour me intrigued but I doubt I'd refuse to play because of it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Under the paving stones, the beach
United Kingdom
Huddersfield
West Yorkshire
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I hear RockPaperScissors is going to be massive this year.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel Fish
United States
East Longmeadow
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
sgosaric wrote:

3) The new trend in mechanistics seems to be piling mechanics over mechanics over mechanics. Look it's area control + drafting + set collecting + worker placement + has dice. Wheee. Basically euro are becoming ameritrashy, only with less theme.


The "Yo Dawg" effect

9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Erin Jean
United States
New Jersey
flag msg tools
badge
Geeky Gimp reviews at geekygimp.com!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Buckersuk wrote:


(2) The Castles of Burgandy and Tzolk'in are not worker placement games.

Also +1 for applauding Hanabi as a new and fresh design.


Why do you not consider Tzolk'in a WPG? I'm not necessarily disagreeing, but I'm curious what else it could be.

And I also agree about Hanabi. A very simple, yet unique game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kenny VenOsdel
United States
Saint Paul
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
sgosaric wrote:

Quote:
Hanabi for example uses no new mechanic, yet still feels very new and fresh.

:what:
What about turning the hand of cards around, so only other players see it?


There is an ages old party game that does this already, albeit with a single card only. There is also an entire style of poker that does this. Heck, even Oh Hell! uses this mechanic during part of the game. Antoine didn't invent the mechanic, he just used it in a new way and made a much better game than any that I just mentioned.

Quote:

What about combining cooperative games with deduction than manages to create a non confrontational double think game?


You just said it. He combined two mechanics and made an interesting game. Those aren't new, and they are still seperate mechanisms or more specifically genres.

Quote:

Both are these are very unique, and the latter in particular is an achievemnt.
Maybe your idea of mechanics is too narrow?


He used those previously existing mechanics in very fresh and interesting ways but he didn't invent anything that hadn't been done before. He just did them in a very intelligent and fun way.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Buckley
England
Bath
Somerset
flag msg tools
23rd June: Black Thursday :(
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
zinehappy wrote:
Buckersuk wrote:


(2) The Castles of Burgandy and Tzolk'in are not worker placement games.

Also +1 for applauding Hanabi as a new and fresh design.


Why do you not consider Tzolk'in a WPG? I'm not necessarily disagreeing, but I'm curious what else it could be.

And I also agree about Hanabi. A very simple, yet unique game.


I suppose Tzolk'in could be considered WP if you like broader definitions than me. I just think the action selection mechanism is sufficiently innovative to merit a new term, perhaps "cog selection".
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Explosive 6
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
What about Tokaido had games used the leapfrog movement mechanic before? The BGG listing for it has point to point movement, set collection and time track down as the mechanics.

I know Francis Drake is also using a similar leapfrog movement mechanic but I can't think of any others off the top of my head. That listing has dice rolling, set collection and worker placement as the mechanics.

EDIT:
Ah nevermind, it seems that is the "time track" movement and there are quite a few games listed that use it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Samo Oleami
Slovenia
Ljubljana
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
kvenosdel wrote:
Quote:

What about combining cooperative games with deduction than manages to create a non confrontational double think game?


You just said it. He combined two mechanics and made an interesting game. Those aren't new, and they are still seperate mechanisms or more specifically genres.

I didn't say it. Cooperative game is not a mechanic - it's a structure. He didn't combine two mechanics, he changed the structure of a cooperative game by adding deduction (is that mechanic? for me that's a process as it's something a player does) and created a structure which enables groupthink in cooperative game.

Bauza managed to create a unique player environment unlike any other. That's as far as one can go in innovations.

kvenosdel wrote:
He used those previously existing mechanics in very fresh and interesting ways but he didn't invent anything that hadn't been done before. He just did them in a very intelligent and fun way.

I'm trying to understand the logic of this and it causes me to bump my head against the wall. He created a completely new kind of player experience. That's for me far far greater achievement than somebody adding new mechanical twist to I dunno set collecting or sumthing.

Innovation in gaming IS in creating new kind of gaming environment. Mechanics are just for those people who are obsessed with them, i.e ."mechanists".

And I said before - mechanical innovations often aren't so much innovation as progression. Worker placement is for me similar to a kind of role selelction and so on. That's not as innovative as it seems.

Creating a new kind of interplayer enviroment is as innovative as it gets.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tony Go
United States
New York
Manhattan
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
If you're having hull problems I feel bad for you son, I've got 99 problems but a breach ain't one.
badge
TauLeaderGames.com
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The complete removal of dice from the hobby. We're getting closer and closer to deterministic gameplay and permutations.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kenny VenOsdel
United States
Saint Paul
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
sgosaric wrote:
kvenosdel wrote:
Quote:

What about combining cooperative games with deduction than manages to create a non confrontational double think game?


You just said it. He combined two mechanics and made an interesting game. Those aren't new, and they are still seperate mechanisms or more specifically genres.

I didn't say it. Cooperative game is not a mechanic - it's a structure. He didn't combine two mechanics, he changed the structure of a cooperative game by adding deduction (is that mechanic? for me that's a process as it's something a player does) and created a structure which enables groupthink in cooperative game.

Bauza managed to create a unique player environment unlike any other. That's as far as one can go in innovations.

kvenosdel wrote:
He used those previously existing mechanics in very fresh and interesting ways but he didn't invent anything that hadn't been done before. He just did them in a very intelligent and fun way.

I'm trying to understand the logic of this and it causes me to bump my head against the wall. He created a completely new kind of player experience. That's for me far far greater achievement than somebody adding new mechanical twist to I dunno set collecting or sumthing.

Innovation in gaming IS in creating new kind of gaming environment. Mechanics are just for those people who are obsessed with them, i.e ."mechanists".

And I said before - mechanical innovations often aren't so much innovation as progression. Worker placement is for me similar to a kind of role selelction and so on. That's not as innovative as it seems.

Creating a new kind of interplayer enviroment is as innovative as it gets.


Ah I see what you are saying. This thread though is about a new mechanic not a new playing style or innovation. I thought you were arguing for those things as creating new mechanics. The quote you disagreed with
Quote:
Hanabi for example uses no new mechanic, yet still feels very new and fresh.


Specifically says it feels fresh and new but uses no new mechanic. By disagreeing with that it sounds like you are arguing that Hanabi felt fresh and new because he invented new mechanics with it.

Quote:

What about turning the hand of cards around, so only other players see it?
What about combining cooperative games with deduction than manages to create a non confrontational double think game?
Both are these are very unique, and the latter in particular is an achievemnt.
Maybe your idea of mechanics is too narrow?
(emphasis mine)

Also you are the one that suggested cooperative and deduction were mechanics. :) I was responding to your statement.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dex Quest
United Kingdom
Maryport
Cumbria
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Other than refinements of mixes we know (the lovely looking Francis Drake, for example) I think dexterity (Rampage), gimmicks (against the clock in Escape' etc), very cheap Kickstarter ($10-$15 anything at least until folk realise they're buying the equivalent of a pnp game) and space games with minis (take your pick) will share the talking space at Essen, not new mechanics as such.

The blend of euro and theme (AT if you must) in games like Lords of Waterdeep and Robinson Crusoe, K2 and more has been a real trend (Blame those bored, crazy creative Poles) and I think we'll see much more quality story stuff like these in among the cubes.

It's not like the music industry suddenly comes up with a new genre to replace classical, rock, pop, or grunge every year. New songs usually stay close to a well-loved style, with the odd hybrid duet or blend of styles to keep things fresh. Maybe we'll see a parallel in gaming. Then again, have we had the equivalent of hip-hop in gaming yet? I don't think so
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe
United States
Shoreview
Minnesota
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Horror Leader wrote:
The complete removal of dice from the hobby. We're getting closer and closer to deterministic gameplay and permutations.


I seriously doubt this. That's one preference of a certain sub-group of gamers, but I can tell you wargamers will never let this happen and ameritrashers will never let this happen. Dice are an automatic part of the structure for those genres. You cannot have an ancients comsim without dice or some other form of random outcome generation. It wouldn't be "accurate." Games like Last Night on Earth wouldn't be fun without rolling gobs and gobs of dice. Some people play games for dice alone.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brandon
United Kingdom
Exeter
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
willsargent wrote:

It's not like the music industry suddenly comes up with a new genre to replace classical, rock, pop, or grunge every year. New songs usually stay close to a well-loved style, with the odd hybrid duet or blend of styles to keep things fresh. Maybe we'll see a parallel in gaming. Then again, have we had the equivalent of hip-hop in gaming yet? I don't think so


Except: a) no musical style ever arises out of nowhere, with no connection to its peers; styles slowly emerge from aforementioned initial hybrids, just like in biological evolution. b) musical innovation has largely been driven by technological innovation, so it may not be the best comparison here. Hip-hop was initially based on funk and soul and really exploded with the introduction of samplers and drum machines. It didn't come from nowhere.

If anything, game evolution and music evolution would only be comparable if you connect game mechanics to instruments and studio gizmos. New music emerges mainly from novel combinations of instruments and recording techniques, and very rarely from the introduction of something brand new (and then that brand new thing spawns a bunch of other attempts to use it and to perfect its use). Similarly, games, I imagine, evolve mainly by the exploration of existing mechanics and unique combinations thereof, and, very rarely, a new mechanic comes along that shakes things up for a while. As for themes, I dunno, I guess they would be comparable to musical themes or keys; they add flavor and there may be trends, but they're not instrumental in the evolution of a genre.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel Fish
United States
East Longmeadow
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
jheaney wrote:
Horror Leader wrote:
The complete removal of dice from the hobby. We're getting closer and closer to deterministic gameplay and permutations.


I seriously doubt this. That's one preference of a certain sub-group of gamers, but I can tell you wargamers will never let this happen and ameritrashers will never let this happen. Dice are an automatic part of the structure for those genres. You cannot have an ancients comsim without dice or some other form of random outcome generation. It wouldn't be "accurate." Games like Last Night on Earth wouldn't be fun without rolling gobs and gobs of dice. Some people play games for dice alone.


Agreed. Dice (and other randomness) will never be eliminated from games. And should never be - randomness provides continuous freshness, novelty, and excitement. And randomness actually brings games closer to reality - having to plan for the unexpected is a part of life.

I know there are plenty of people on this site who want 100% determinism - and to those people I suggest you try a lightly themed Euro that hasn't gotten much attention on this site called Chess.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.