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Subject: Making replacement cards and map rss

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Dan Scott
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Hi Folks,

I've recently decided to undergo a reworking of the map (and possibly cards) for this game. I feel the map art is sub-standard, and the lack of agreement in colours between cards and regions is upsetting.

So, I've scanned the entire board into the old PC and I'm in the process of revamping it. I haven't yet decided if the final proof will be printed on thick-stock paper or mounted on a foldable board like the original.

The other thing - the cards. I'd like to redo the lot of them, I think.. Has anyone done this? Not nessasarily with this game, but in general? What are some of the concerns? Can anyone give any advice?

As I think about it, I believe that the cards really ought to be redone more than the map (and make the colours match better), but I just can't stand the basic fonts on the board and really want to flash it up a bit. It's hard to believe that the box art, which is so great, is barely reproduced anywhere else in the game!
 
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Maarten D. de Jong
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PsyJam wrote:
I've recently decided to undergo a reworking of the map (and possibly cards) for this game. I feel the map art is sub-standard, and the lack of agreement in colours between cards and regions is upsetting.

The map itself is beautiful if you can forgive it the tiny omission of a (2) in a northern region. Okay, the colour discrepancy is not something to be proud of, but once I pointed out to my fellow players what the discerning characteristic was, noone made a mistake nor asked for confirmation. I agree, the error should not have been made in the first place, but it is only a big deal if you make it into one.

However, the Boxes all over the place in their bold Times New Roman... That is ick-yuck-fooey first class.

Quote:
So, I've scanned the entire board into the old PC and I'm in the process of revamping it. I haven't yet decided if the final proof will be printed on thick-stock paper or mounted on a foldable board like the original.

Making a proper foldable board is not easy especially if you want it to fold like a professionally made one. You'll have to cut through cardboard, but not the linnen backing allowing the thing to fold while keeping all parts together. In other words, the depth of your cut has to be correct with a precision greater than +/- 0.5 mm. If you are doing that with a freshly printed A2-sized drawing, you require a very steady hand... There's a few alternatives of course: the old-fashioned way with a 'pinch' in the middle; or in separate 'panels'; or in 'double' panels which are foldable. Separate panels is hard on players, because they will shift and upset the pieces. 'Double' panels is quite doable in a professional way because you can cut first, and glue later; and the amount of panels you require for Liberté is low (3 should do it) so upsetting the pieces is less likelier than with just single panels. The final option is of course a single mounted map, but that usually wreaks havoc with storage, so I'm not considering that a genuine alternative .

I would advise against using a map on thick paper; it simply doesn't look 'right'.

Quote:
The other thing - the cards. I'd like to redo the lot of them, I think.. Has anyone done this? Not nessasarily with this game, but in general? What are some of the concerns? Can anyone give any advice?

The main concern with cards is that you, in all probability, will never get the feel of a genuine professional deck. That may not sound like a big deal, but if there's one thing which annoys me in a game, it's improper cards which won't slide and shuffle properly. Siena has such second-rate material, and it genuinely diminishes my playing pleasure. Some people will happily use such cards for prototyping and claim that they handle well; it is my sincere belief that they are lying through their teeth.

After experimentation with lamination, waxes and spray-on coatings, I've come to the conclusion that there is no way you can create cards with the proper slickness unless you happen to work at a company which has the necessary equipment to print and coat cardstock. Forget about buying a genuine coating yourself: those are highly prized formulae, often requiring many complex spraying and drying steps to obtain the proper (and even!) thickness. But then again, perhaps you are lucky enough to obtain a few gallons from Anchorlith, although it doesn't seem to be in their regular collection right now: http://www.anchorlith.com/anchorbrands/assets/images/4534W.p.... (But look at the drying conditions---not easy to achieve!) The sobering conclusion: your cards will never will be like the genuine thing. They might be beautiful to behold, but you'd be surprised to realise that there is more to it than that.

All in all, you're doing all the nasty things of DIY game copying. Are you sure you dislike the Liberté board and cards that much...?

Edited for clarity.
 
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Dan Scott
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Maarten,

Thank you very much for your detailed insight into the matter... I must admit, I am very naive to all of this.. I just thought, "well, I'm good with photoshop, so.. lets just do this!" What I had initially intended to do was find a print shop somewhere nearby that could take the image that I designed and then print it out onto a mounted board and they could do the cutting.. (I'd provide them with the original to get the idea and correct sizing).. ie, they'd do all the work. If it comes down to me having to do everything myself, well.... I may work on the map but without gusto.. It's the Times New Roman font that I absoultely hate!

As for the cards - truly, I value the insight. At best, I figured that the cards would be sub-par - at worst, basically impossible. I see now that the cards would be best left unrevised, or at least, I ought to take a good stab at resdesigning the map before devling into the cards.

All and all, making cards sounds messy... sounds like it's best to be avoided unless I find a specialty printer who'd do it for me.

Thanks again!
 
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Alkis Moraitis
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About the cards: You can design them and print them on thicker paper, cut them and insert them inside sleeve protectors. That way they will handle adequately, they will be uniform, they will always be new and you will have that special feeling of playing with your own cards.
 
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Ron K
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I can't help with the cards (other than to print on avery style labels and attach those to either the current cards or blank playing cards and then put the lot in card sleaves - not my first choice though).

However, I've had great success making proper folding boards for my home made games.

I get thick cardboard sheets from the local arts store.

I use a rotary cutter (free hand with a metal long straight edge) to cut the boards to size.

I cut half way through the board on the hinge side of each panel and apply linen book binding tape to that side prior to mounting the paper to the board. For a four panel board, one side gets a tape hinge all the way across and the other side gets half a hinge from the top to the middle. I can cut halfway through by adjusting the blade guard on the rotary cutter in combination with the thickness of the ruler.

I print the map by first rendering it as a PDF and then use Adobe's Acrobat to print it out in sections with overlapping edges. I lay out the paper map and use masking tape to keep the section in alignment (overlapping). I then cut down the middle of each overlap to get a perfect edge (and remove the redundent strip from the front of one piece and the back of the other - but I keep the masking tape holding them in the correct orientation. The paper prints in a tiled format which leaves plenty of whitespace around the art (bigger than the cardboard sheet).

I then spray the back of the paper with 3M Super 77 and then flex the board on top of it. I cut the corners square and then fold over the sides to wrap to the back. I then carefully align the opposite side cuts in the cardboard with the edges of the originals to complete the cut through the board leaving the linen binding tape underneath as a flexible hinge (The board was first cut halfway through and then the linen tape was applied over the cut - now the opposite side of the board is cut to complete the seperation with the linen holding it together. The paper glues very well to the linen tape.

I then spray and mount a suitable backing paper (wrapping paper).

Last, I spray both sides with gloss Krylon UV resistent clear spray (about three times with a minute between passes). The spray is slightly absorbed into the paper leaving a non-glossy but protected surface.

If you're careful with the ruler, you can get nice square corners and a very european looking board with fully wrapped edges.

One of these days I'll take the sequence of steps, with photos, and put it up on my web site.
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Brad Miller
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If you want real boardgame boards, head down to your local thrift store and pick up some crappy games for a couple of bucks each. Now you've got real boards. Paste your graphics over those, and away you go.
 
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Maarten D. de Jong
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RaDiKal wrote:
I can cut halfway through by adjusting the blade guard on the rotary cutter in combination with the thickness of the ruler.

That is of course the trick you're after. Can you post a link to a picture of such a cutter, please? I think I know what you mean, but I just want to make sure
 
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Ron K
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I use a Carl CC-10 rotary trimmer. See the pictured item on this page (and zoom for a closer look):



http://www.factory-express.com/Paper_Cutters/Rotary_Paper_Tr...

The head can be positioned from -90 to +90 degrees relative to the handle -- I use the full 90. The light blue wheel at the elbow allows retracting the safety cover to expose the blade. It also prevents cutting beyond a certain depth. For thick cardboard, I use just the blade and safety cover to limit the cut to a bit more than half way through. For thinner cardboard, I reverse the elbow so the safety cover rides on top of my metal ruler (making the blade cut a more shallow depth).

I also have a conventional rotary paper cutter for cutting out the playing pieces (square and hex tiles) - makes for quick work.


http://www.factory-express.com/Paper_Cutters/Rotary_Paper_Tr...
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Dan Scott
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Hey folks,

Thanks for the additional ideas/advice/comments. I knew you guys were out there (you know, the creative types), and I value your insight.

Cheers!
 
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Maarten D. de Jong
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RaDiKal wrote:
The head can be positioned from -90 to +90 degrees relative to the handle -- I use the full 90. The light blue wheel at the elbow allows retracting the safety cover to expose the blade. It also prevents cutting beyond a certain depth. For thick cardboard, I use just the blade and safety cover to limit the cut to a bit more than half way through. For thinner cardboard, I reverse the elbow so the safety cover rides on top of my metal ruler (making the blade cut a more shallow depth).

Very sneaky, although perfectly logical and understandable. The problem is that in the hobby stores I visited, they don't have this type of cutter. Thanks for the info, I'll put it to good use!
 
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Ron K
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I got mine at a Staples store (US). You could also try any other office supply store (that would stock a typical flat bed paper trimmer) or an arts supply store.
 
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Mik Svellov
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Cards are easily made using Avery's free Designpro software:
http://www.avery.com/

I make all my cards on double-sided calling cards which are sprayed with a clear acryllic varnish for protection and then trimmed with a corner cutter.

Very easy to do.
 
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