John Hedges
United Kingdom
Penrith
Cumbria, UNITED KINGDOM
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Good question. I have some counters I'd like to print and stick to card, so I would also be interested in the answer.
 
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Jake Staines
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Grantham
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egamar wrote:

I don't have the faintest clue what to use to stick them - the words "spray mount" come to mind, but I have no idea what that is!


Spray mount is glue in a spray can - my current favourite is 3M Super-77, but there are others. You can get it in most big stationers - including Staples - and art supply shops.

(There are fewer online retailers carrying spray cans of any kind 'cause most couriers refuse to carry pressurised containers.)

Spray mount is pretty good for this kind of thing. Another option is contact adhesive (which comes in tins or in spray cans), but that can be tricky to apply and the final glue is a one-time-only affair, if you get it wrong there's no chance to go back.

Another, more-expensive but possibly-nicer option is to get a Xyron laminating machine, because you can get cartridges for those which just apply adhesive to any old bit of paper or card you can fit through it in order to turn it into a sticker. I make most of my nice-quality small boards and counters like that.
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Miguel Sanhueza
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Brighton
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For smallish tokens I wouldn't recommend spray at all. If you spray the paper printouts individually after you've cut them, the force of the spray could send them fluttering away. Also, you'll need a fresh surface laid down to put the next token on else it'll stick to where you previously sprayed. Plus it's massive overkill using a spraycan for a tiny inch wide token, the spray lands everywhere!

If you spray the tokens, the glue will land on the top, the sides, the surrounding surface, thus getting on your fingers when you try to pick it up and remain sticky and may easily get messy when you handle it to apply the printouts.

Another option is to spray mount the whole sheet to thick card in one go and cut them out making wholly new tokens.

But assuming you don't want to do this, then PVA would actually work just fine in my opinion. You can apply it to the back of the token with a brush quite thinly, this gives you a bit of movement when you put the printout onto it too as it won't immediately dry. When you've pressed it on, you can also wipe away any excess glue that gets squeezed out with just your finger or cloth (or kitchen paper is good, as it's thicker and better than tissue which can get damp and tear too easily)
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Miguel Sanhueza
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Brighton
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Here's a quick vid from Cheapass games that gives one way of making token sheets that might give you an idea or two...

I've made lots of counters using just a metal ruler and a sharp craft knife so I know it works for me, but there's lots of ways of approaching this kind of problem so you may have to try a couple before you find what level of effort you're happy putting in.

Good luck!
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Holger Doessing
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egamar wrote:
miggor wrote:

If you spray the tokens, the glue will land on the top, the sides, the surrounding surface, thus getting on your fingers when you try to pick it up and remain sticky and may easily get messy when you handle it to apply the printouts.

A glue stick will likely do just fine for this project. No overspray, no super-fast drying, no glue-soaked paper. Some fellow BGGers recommend UHU glue sticks (search the forum if you want a specific product name).
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Jake Staines
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Grantham
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egamar wrote:

What 'card' material would you use for e.g. a) a Small-World type race token and b) a game board?


I don't recall exactly how thick the Small World tokens are, offhand...

One surprising source of good-quality card is comics backer boards - these are the sheets of card that comics collectors place inside the mylar pocket with the comic to keep it flat and stiff. They have to be acid-free and reasonably high-quality or they may damage the comic, but for some reason they're actually fairly inexpensive - just don't buy the ones which come with the mylar pockets unless you have some other use for them. (This was a tip I picked up myself on BGG a while back.)

Mounting board is available from pretty much all good art-supply places and some stationers, and you can sometimes get good-sized offcuts from framing shops if you ask nicely, 'cause they can't use the bits which are smaller than your average picture. Mount board has to hold a decent edge because it's usually cut at a 45-degree angle to frame stuff. It's relatively expensive, but usually pretty nice stuff.

The generic name to look for is 'greyboard', which you can find in various places online but fairly rarely in brick-and-mortar shops. For some reason it's always measured in microns thick, so instead of saying "this board is 1.2mm thick" and everyone understanding what they mean, they say "this board if 1200 microns thick".


I would totally agree that spray-mounting individual tiles is prone to problems - I would advise spray-mounting a whole sheet onto the board at once and then cutting them out, or using a more-directly-applied glue if you have to do them a token at a time. My experience with plain PVA for paper has nearly always been bad, though, wrinkles everywhere.


(When making boards, consider mounting something to both sides of them, even if it's blank paper. Otherwise, you'll possibly have created a paper equivalent of the bi-metallic strip in a thermostat and your board risks warping. It's not so much of a problem in the UK as it is elsewhere in the world because our weather is boring, but it's worth bearing in mind.)


Quote:

Oh - BTW - I noticed in one of your other posts you talked about using a rotary cutter - is that like a sharp pizza wheel for paper/card? I tried something like that once for wallpaper trimming back in the days when wallpaper was fashionable - I went back quickly to using a stanley knife!

Why do you use/prefer the rotary cutter? (Assuming you still do!)


Personally I prefer a rotary cutter (which is indeed a bit like a pizza wheel) because where a knife drags through the cut, a rotary cutter presses down the entire length of the cut.

Dragging is the most common cause of ragged edges on cuts, and it happens increasingly as the knife loses its sharpness. The blade starts to not cut through the card so easily and pulls at the fibres instead, which causes them to pull out sideways and tear rather than cut through.

With a rotary cutter, because the wheel rotates, the next bit of blade is always moving predominantly downwards, and therefore the cut is generally much cleaner.



The problem most people have with rotary cutters is that they stray away from the ruler and don't cut straight... but with a little practice this can be overcome. In my experience, people often don't appreciate just how much they "toe in" the knife towards the ruler when they cut, and fail to do the same thing with the rotary cutter. When viewed from the side, the disc of the cutter should be perfectly vertical; when viewed from above, the disc of the cutter should be ever so slightly angled towards the ruler in the direction of the cut, to keep the blade pressing against the ruler and therefore being forced into a straight line by the ruler. Angle it too much and it'll ride up the ruler and cut your fingers, though, so be careful! Many light passes are better than one deep and heavy one where you have to press so hard that when the cutter skips and hits your finger it cuts it clean off!
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Cameron Calka
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For mounting I use an adhesive spray. Most of them are rather forgiving, as you get a minute or two of "tackiness" which will allow you to adjust your paper sheet if you put it down incorrectly onto the board. I then stack it between some heavy books and let it dry.

For my boards and tokens, the only thing I use now is "book board", which is the same stuff they use as the covers for hard cover books. The stuff is sturdy and makes great boards and tokens... but is difficult to cut through. I use a set of utility knives and a pile of blades when cutting things out. The moment it starts to lose its edge, I switch out the knife before it starts to tear instead of cut.
 
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Renate Cloake
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Worthing
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egamar wrote:

I'm still umm-ing and ahh-ing about the best cutting solution, I favour the guillotine (but I bet there's some rubbish out there and a good one will cost a bob or two) so I may opt for the rotary cutter version (ie on a 'frame' rather than freehand) to take account of my poor eyesight and shaking hands

I got my rotary cutter very cheaply from the Range http://www.therange.co.uk/rotary-cutter-small//the-range/fcp... and it cuts through mountboard beautifully. You will need a mat or something to cut into - self-healing mats can be quite expensive, but a thick spare piece of card would do as well. It is also advisable to get a metal-edged or metal ruler as rotary cutters will make short work of plastic rulers.

In crafting circles, my friends are very snobbish about having rotary blades in their papertrimmers http://www.therange.co.uk/a4-rotary-trimmer/trimmers/the-ran... - they supposedly give a cleaner cut. I have a cheap paper trimmer with a fixed blade and it cuts paper fine, but you do need to keep replacing the blades as they get blunt quick. A paper trimmer will only cut through thinnish card and certainly wouldn't do very well against mountboard.
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Coen Velden
Germany
Geldern
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I used a glue stick to glue the paper on these:



I admit that I do have a steady hand, and have access to the right tools at work, so I decided to do them all one by one.

The paper is printed on high-quality paper at the local copy shop.
The material underneath is called hdf, which is sturdier than mdf.

Step 1:

Saw every piece with an electrical bandsaw.

Step 2:

Cutting the paper tokens with a brand new cutting-knife.

Step 3:

Glue-stick the paper tokens onto the hdf pieces.

Step 4:

After the glue dried (a few hours later), I sanded every piece very carefully with an electrical sanding machine, to ensure that all the pieces have the same size.

So now my Puerto Rico box has two versions of the tokens, one with pictures, and one without.
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Chris Robbins
United States
Alcoa
Tennessee
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If it were me, I'd print the .pdf image on full sheet label paper, do the cutting with whatever works best, peel the backing off and stick 'em on.

Laser printers and appropriate label sheets might be good to go as is, but with my inkjet I'd spray on some UV protectant sealer.

[ETA] I only use spray on glue to laminate two thinner sheets of cardboard together. It never goes near anything on which I've spent printer ink.
 
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United Kingdom
Southampton
Hampshire
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I'll think of something witty to put here...
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I like to use UHU in a tube. You can buy decent sized tubes from the pound shop.
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