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Subject: Prototype Tips & Tricks 001; Making cards cheaply and easily rss

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Eric Jome
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Introduction

I like to work on game design. But I find something standing in my way. I need prototype materials for my games, but I don't know anything about how to use graphic design software. And I find positioning and tweaking with a mouse in image manipulation software to be very time consuming, sometimes difficult, and very complex. For a prototype, I'd like to focus on clarity and simplicity and just be able to put my ideas in a usable format for testing and development.

This then is one method of doing that. The advantage of this method is that all the components are free, easy to use, and there's a wealth of help available online for anyone. What's the technique?

We're going to write HTML, the simplest, most basic language of web pages.

This will let us be precise without relying on mouse skills or complex applications. It's what HTML was invented for in the first place. All we'll need is a text editor, like Notepad, and a web browser, like Google Chrome.

Let's get started!

First Steps: Thinking About Cards

A good approach to building a game with a deck of cards is to use card sleeves. A sleeve will hold a playing card (or old CCG card) to give it weight and strength, but still have room in it to slide in a sheet of paper. How many cards can we get on a standard 8.5" by 11" sheet of paper? Nine. So, our generic prototype should have a 3 x 3 grid on it, slightly smaller than typical cards.

Here's the HTML you need to get started;


<html>
<head>
<title>
Basic Portrait Layout
</title>
</head>

<body>

<div style="width: 648px; height: 864px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; ">
<div style="width: 648px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: relative; ">
<div style="width: 214px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; border: 1px solid black; text-align: center; ">

<!-- Remove this line and type your text here! -->

</div>
<div style="width: 214px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 216px; border: 1px solid black; ">

<!-- Remove this line and type your text here! -->

</div>
<div style="width: 214px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 432px; border: 1px solid black; ">

<!-- Remove this line and type your text here! -->

</div>
</div>
<div style="width: 648px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: relative; ">
<div style="width: 214px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; border: 1px solid black; ">

<!-- Remove this line and type your text here! -->

</div>
<div style="width: 214px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 216px; border: 1px solid black; ">

<!-- Remove this line and type your text here! -->

</div>
<div style="width: 214px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 432px; border: 1px solid black; ">

<!-- Remove this line and type your text here! -->

</div>
</div>
<div style="width: 648px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: relative; ">
<div style="width: 214px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; border: 1px solid black; ">

<!-- Remove this line and type your text here! -->

</div>
<div style="width: 214px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 216px; border: 1px solid black; ">

<!-- Remove this line and type your text here! -->

</div>
<div style="width: 214px; height: 286px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 432px; border: 1px solid black; ">

<!-- Remove this line and type your text here! -->

</div>
</div>
</div>

</body>
</html>


Does this seem complex? All you need to do is copy and paste it into a text editor program like Notepad and save it. Save it with a name like "basic portrait layout.html" then open the file with Chrome. It should look like this;



Now you can copy and paste this file, add text to it and change it however you like. Suppose I wanted to put in a sample card type. I

could add the following at each place it says "";


<p style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 24pt; line-height: 32px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; ">
Card Title
</p>
<img src="images/die_symbol.png" />
<p style="font-size: 12pt; line-height: 21px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; ">
This is the action of the card. Remove this section and replace with your materials.
</p>
<p style="font-style: italic; font-size: 10pt; line-height: 17px; margin: 0px; padding 0px; position: absolute; bottom: 10px; ">
This is the flavor text of the card. Remove this section and replace with your materials.
</p>


The result looks something like this;



This is getting a bit fancier with layout tags like paragraph, image tags, and changing the properties of the fonts. This stuff is all very easy to use and understand with some basic instructions and searching Google for keywords "html", "style", and a description of what you want.

This approach lets you do fast prototyping as you just have type in your text and you can review your changes by saving the file and refreshing the view in the browser.

In Depth: Looking at the HTML in detail

What we have in this example is a standard document. There's a large division ("div") of the main space. This has in it three divisions ("div"); these are rows. Each row has 3 divisions ("div") in it; those are cells, our individual cards. By using the style tag, especially with "position: absolute;", "top:", and "left:", we control precisely where things appear. In the future, I'll have a more advanced discussion of working with this - I'll talk about images and adding them to your documents. The only thing you need to really try in your initial outing is the paragraph tab, .

Getting Physical: Printing Out Cards

You know one of the cool features of Chrome is that it lets you print to PDF, even if you don't have a printer. Like this;



When you print to a PDF, you get a file that's very usable. You could easily share or upload it. A physical copy of the PDF will look like this;



Conclusion

This technique is intended to give you way to cheaply and precisely create prototype cards for your game. It would be a lot more work, but you could get final versions with this technique too. However, here we're looking to print out some cards we can tuck into sleeves and play. The kind of thing we can easily edit, throw away, and re-sleeve for another test.

Happy printing!
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Craig Somerton
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Great idea Eric, good stuff!

I normally use Inkscape for all my card and board designs and most commonly use these blank card templates (pdf format), which have 8 standard 3.5 x 2.5 inch cards per page.

Here are links to the shared pdfs if anyone is interested.

Blank Card Template - A4

Blank Card Template - Letter
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Isaac Shalev
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Do you open these templates in Inkscape? I've never even tried to open a pdf in inkscape.
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Gregg Jewell
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Now I can see the html format being somewhat useful if combining it with CSS to change fonts or colors on the fly but this seems like a lot more work for someone unfamiliar with HTML than a standard word document with a 2x4 table and 2.5"x3.5" cells.

I may have missed the point of your post entirely which I apologize.
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ender7 wrote:
Do you open these templates in Inkscape? I've never even tried to open a pdf in inkscape.

No. But I have the svg files, if you want them.

Blank Cards Template .svg format
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Eric Jome
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JewellGames wrote:
I may have missed the point of your post entirely which I apologize.


Word is not free. Word is not always available. Working with complex layout in Word can be very challenging; you must often nest tables and deal with quirky, imprecise layouts.

Word is a fine choice if you have it. So are applications like GIMP. This is just another alternative.
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Almarr Ormarsson
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I really like the idea of this and might use something similar on my next protype.

However, I think it's much easier to learn some basic CSS for styling, all these inline styles make my head hurt. CSS is NOT complicated, in fact it's much simpler than inline styles IMO.

But nice job
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Mark J
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This is an absolutely fascinating idea, and one that I intend to tinker with.

First, the bad news. Somebody feel free to jump in and correct me if I'm wrong, but to the best of my knowledge, it is very tricky to get a browser to print an HTML document with the precise sizes and locations that you want. Yes, CSS lets you say things like "width: 2.5in; height: 3.5in;" This is a trick. I just tried that and it actually printed more like 2.7 x 3.8. I printed the exact same document with IE10 and with Chrome and the images came out different sizes. I don't know why browsers have a problem making a box a certain size when drawing programs have no apparent problem with this idea, but that's how it is. I had to tinker and use trial and error to get the "card template" to print with the size and position on the page that I wanted.

Maybe the trick is to use something other than a browser to format and print it. Is there some other readily-available HTML-printing program? I can't think of one off the top of my head.

But to the good news. I see two, maybe three huge advantages to this idea.

1. You can use style sheets. Right now I'm designing cards with CorelDraw. That's not hard and works pretty well. But for example I was printing the titles on the top of one set of cards as 18 point. Then I discovered that some of the cards had two much information to fit, so I reduced the size of the title to 16 point. Which meant I had to go through every card to change the font size. And then I had to re-center the title on every card. (Okay, if I'd been smart the first time I would have set the alignment to center and then centered the block. I've done that now.) But with an HTML approach, you could create a style sheet, make all your card titles, say, an h1, and then if you want to change the font size or whatever about the title, just change it once in the style sheet.

2. As the description of the card is all text, you can do search-and-replace to make changes. Like I had a border on the cards. I wanted to change the border. With CorelDraw, I had to go through each card changing the border. Yes, I made a template page so I really only had to do it for one page, but still, fair amount of effort. With HTML, you could search for "src=foo.gif" and replace it with "src=bar.gif" or whatever. Get them all in one swoop.

3. As it's all text, you could even put information about your cards into a file or a database, and then write a program to generate the card layouts that would just be manipulating text, not have to get into any complex graphic manipulations. Maybe writing the program would be more trouble than just editing the HTML, but the idea has potential.
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Mark J
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One suggestion: I think it would be easier to make the card template a table, and then each new card is just a "td".

I took your idea and I was tinkering with this example. I think it's simpler to work with.

<html><title>Test Card Layout</title>
<style type="text/css">
table.card {position: absolute; top: 22px; left:45px; border-collapse: collapse; margin: 0; padding: 0;}
table.card tr {height: 315px; border: 1px solid black; margin: 0;}
table.card td {width: 223px; border: 1px solid black; margin: 0; padding: 16px 8px; vertical-align: top;}

h1 {font: bold 18px serif; margin: 0; width: 100%; text-align: center;}
p {font: 11px sans-serif;}
p.group {font: italic 12px sans-serif; width: 100%; text-align: center;}
</style>
<table class="card">
<tr>
<td><h1>Dog</h1>
<p class="group">Group: Canine</p>
<p>Often called "man's best friend". Likes to chase sticks.</p>
</td>
<td><h1>Cat</h1>
<p class="group">Group: Feline</p>
<p>Probably woman's best friend. Skilled at napping and destroying furniture.</p>
</td>
<td><h1>Horse</h1>
<p class="group">Group: Equine</p>
<p>A very useful create for riding on. Can get you places fast. Relatively difficult to keep as a house pet.</p>
</td>
<tr><td>Card 4</td>
<td>Card 5</td>
<td>Card 6</td>
<tr><td>Card 7</td>
<td>Card 8</td>
<td>Card 9<br>223x315</td>
</table>

I printed this from Chrome with headers and footers turned off and "margins" set to "none" and it worked pretty well.
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Almarr Ormarsson
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saneperson wrote:
3. As it's all text, you could even put information about your cards into a file or a database, and then write a program to generate the card layouts that would just be manipulating text, not have to get into any complex graphic manipulations. Maybe writing the program would be more trouble than just editing the HTML, but the idea has potential.

I thought the same thing, I don't think it would be to much of a problem. I would use some basic json though rather than a relational database.

And regarding the printing, there are often special printing style sheets on big websites. I haven't looked into them but do they do something different than normal style sheets for measurements?

saneperson wrote:
One suggestion: I think it would be easier to make the card template a table, and then each new card is just a "td".

I'm not so sure about that. Tables aren't very useful unless you really are making a table (Is a grid of cards really a table?). I think you could just as well use divs. But I guess both versions work.
 
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Eric Jome
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grautur wrote:
I think it's much easier to learn some basic CSS for styling...


I find the subject of style sheets to be outside the scope of this simple technique. There isn't really enough style elements to warrant it.

As perhaps can be surmised from the title, I don't intend this to be the last effort in this area. I hope to talk about how to extend this to include images, make very precise layouts, and perhaps include style sheets as well.
 
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saneperson wrote:
One suggestion: I think it would be easier to make the card template a table, and then each new card is just a "td".


Tables come with their own overhead, different from a div. Here, I felt it was important to show the technique of "position: absolute" and "position: relative" as these things can be used to really extend this technique to a much wider, more rich concept. Thus, just knowing div tags should keep the complexity of the subject limited.
 
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saneperson wrote:
I just tried that and it actually printed more like 2.7 x 3.8.


Yes. WYSIWYG is difficult with this technique. I've taken care here to show how it works well with a particular practice, but it is a very complex process to support many different browsers. Instead, I really recommend just finding one and choosing that. This is why I recommend Chrome, which has a nice built in "print to PDF" feature and offers and very reliable, standard interpretation of HTML.

Quote:
Maybe the trick is to use something other than a browser to format and print it.


If you find this technique insufficient, I recommend you move on to more traditional tools like GIMP. This technique has advantages and disadvantages, but then so do others. This is, I feel, well suited to simple, quick, easily controlled, low cost work. It requires no special software.
 
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Mark J
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cosine wrote:
grautur wrote:
I think it's much easier to learn some basic CSS for styling...


I find the subject of style sheets to be outside the scope of this simple technique. There isn't really enough style elements to warrant it.

As perhaps can be surmised from the title, I don't intend this to be the last effort in this area. I hope to talk about how to extend this to include images, make very precise layouts, and perhaps include style sheets as well.


As I tried to say in my previous post, I think half the beauty of this technique is that you COULD use style sheets. Then if each card had a standard format -- like a character name; character class; list of ratings like combat, intelligence, wizard level, movement, whatever; etc, you could have a style for each. Then if you decide that character class should be in italics rather than bold, you just change the style sheet rather than having to change every card.
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Mark J
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cosine wrote:
saneperson wrote:
One suggestion: I think it would be easier to make the card template a table, and then each new card is just a "td".


Tables come with their own overhead, different from a div. Here, I felt it was important to show the technique of "position: absolute" and "position: relative" as these things can be used to really extend this technique to a much wider, more rich concept. Thus, just knowing div tags should keep the complexity of the subject limited.


Whatever. I'm not going to argue about it, for the simple reason that neither of us is in any position to force the other to do it his way even if we wanted to. :-) I develop web sites for a living and have been through the table/div argument many times. No need to go into it again on a board game site.

I was doing some tinkering this morning and was able to create a style sheet that allowed me to create the cards just saying <div class="row"> and <div class="cell". The one thing I don't like about your technique -- aside from the sizing and positioning issues that are beyond your control -- was your use of repeated style= tags rather than using style sheets.

But then I had to get back to my actual job.
 
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grautur wrote:
saneperson wrote:
3. As it's all text, you could even put information about your cards into a file or a database, and then write a program to generate the card layouts that would just be manipulating text, not have to get into any complex graphic manipulations. Maybe writing the program would be more trouble than just editing the HTML, but the idea has potential.

I thought the same thing, I don't think it would be to much of a problem. I would use some basic json though rather than a relational database.


Sure, depends what you're trying to do. You could put the data for the cards into any number of formats, whatever proves convenient, whether that's a relational db, JSON, CSV, XML, etc etc etc.

Quote:
And regarding the printing, there are often special printing style sheets on big websites. I haven't looked into them but do they do something different than normal style sheets for measurements?


You can have different style sheets for printing, but I don't know any way to change the measurement scale for printing to make it actually correspond to a physical sheet of paper. You can say, e.g. that for printing the font used should be 18 point while for display it should be 12 point and that sort of thing, but I don't know any way to say "make a specification of 1 inch really print 1 inch on a sheet of paper".


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Jim DuBois
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I was thinking of making a program to read data from a file and fill in the template. Then it would really speed things up for me.
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I must humbly retract something that I said earlier. When using IE, at least, measurements given in the CSS are reproduced with very high precision on the printed page. My problem was that I misunderstood the box model. Namely, padding and borders are NOT included in the height and width. (In IE8 they were, but apparently this was changed in IE9. Not sure about the history of other browsers. Man, it's tough enough trying to keep up with all the new stuff in the computer business, never mind when they make subtle changes to the old stuff like this so that what you thought you knew isn't true any more.)

I still don't get expected results with measurements with Chrome, and the exact same document printed with IE and Chrome gives different results. At this point I'm not sure if that's because Chrome really doesn't measure correctly or if there is some other subtlety about what's included in what.

Another useful tidbit I came across today: In older browsers "px" meant one pixel on the screen. Now it has been redefined to mean 1/96th of an inch, regardless of actual pixel size. (With some adjustments for devices intended to be viewed from far away.) I'm guessing this is because as screen resolutions have increased, "100px" could mean very different things on different monitors.

Anyway, this isn't a web design forum so I don't want to get bogged down too far in HTML/CSS details.

My conclusion is that this technique does suffer from some annoying nit-noid detail problems, like mastering the technicalities of the box model and coping with the borders and headings that the browser wants to put on. But it has a lot of potential. I intend to try to re-create a sheet of the cards from the game I'm working now on using this technique and see how it works out in real-live actual practice.
 
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Mark J
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JewellGames wrote:
Now I can see the html format being somewhat useful if combining it with CSS to change fonts or colors on the fly but this seems like a lot more work for someone unfamiliar with HTML than a standard word document with a 2x4 table and 2.5"x3.5" cells.


Maybe you're more skilled with Word than I am. Personally, I've found that trying to get text and images to lay out the way I want them in Word in any but the most trivial cases is a gigantic pain. Yeah, I can make a table and put text in each cell, but once you start saying that you want text at top and bottom and an image in the middle, things just seem to get very confusing. You've got to create frames and set anchor points and all sorts of annoying things.

Maybe you've figured out the philosophy behind it and it all makes sense to you. It doesn't to me.

If it works for you, hey, more power to you.
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Gregg Jewell
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saneperson wrote:
JewellGames wrote:
Now I can see the html format being somewhat useful if combining it with CSS to change fonts or colors on the fly but this seems like a lot more work for someone unfamiliar with HTML than a standard word document with a 2x4 table and 2.5"x3.5" cells.


Maybe you're more skilled with Word than I am. Personally, I've found that trying to get text and images to lay out the way I want them in Word in any but the most trivial cases is a gigantic pain. Yeah, I can make a table and put text in each cell, but once you start saying that you want text at top and bottom and an image in the middle, things just seem to get very confusing. You've got to create frames and set anchor points and all sorts of annoying things.

Maybe you've figured out the philosophy behind it and it all makes sense to you. It doesn't to me.

If it works for you, hey, more power to you.


You make a good point, I may post a thread on the simple steps I take when using tables and more difficult templates. People can use the free openoffice.org software in place of word which has 95% of the same features.
 
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Sorry, I don't want to going OT or hijack the thread, but you have tried nanDECK? In the past, I've looked at HTML for creating cards, and I've found it a bit verbose and somewhat complex when I've wanted to change some element, like add an image or a text on all the cards, insert a card between other two or changing the size of the cards or saving all the cards' images in separate files.

And I choose to create nanDECK, also with the goal to separate the layout from the data, for this in my program you can have all the elements in an Excel or csv file, and use it with a layout script: when you changes, add, or remove cards you leave the layout as is.

http://www.nandeck.com/
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I confirm what Andrea says: NanDeck is the tool.

I have no problem handling computer software, The Gimp, InkScape, even HTML/CSS/Javascript but right now I'm working on a card game prototype (soon to be released) and NanDeck is so much easy to use.

Ok, you need to learn a bit of the NanDeck syntax but it's rather simple.
You can create function, use CSV, and handle text formatting with HTML syntax !

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"Hey, here's a very easy approach to formatting cards that uses very simple software that you already (and always) have on a computer."



"Use Inkscape!"
"Use Word!"
"Use nanDECK!"

shake
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Derek H
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tumorous wrote:
"Hey, here's a very easy approach to formatting cards that uses very simple software that you already (and always) have on a computer."



"Use Inkscape!"
"Use Word!"
"Use nanDECK!"

shake

I love BGG ideas threads!

Part I: The original idea and discussions thereof.

Part II: Presentation of alternatives, and discussions as to why they are better/worse than the original idea.

Part III: The "meta" thread, where people start to point out that posters have now "deviated" from the Original True Way and debate whether or not that is A Good Thing.

Part IV: The meta posters start to argue amongst themselves (coming soon to a thread near you...)
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Andy Lenox
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I don't know why it never occurred to me to use HTML and CSS for card generation. Brilliant! You could also do fancy things like generate each card using a CSV file that you read in with JavaScript. This might have to be my project for this weekend.
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