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Subject: ? regarding the spirit of DEFCON 1 equalling a loss rss

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Stokey Brown
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This question is really for either of the designers: Was the nuclear war rule intended to entrap unwary players? In my games, if someone unwittingly plays a card that causes nuclear war, we say "oops" and take the card back and play something else, but I'm wondering if the designers intended for mistakes like that to be game-ending moves. Would Jason or Ananda care to comment?


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Troy Adlington
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I am pretty sure a Nuclear war would start that way. Unwittingly...or a cunning plan that pushed the other side too far.

 
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Philip Thomas
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Mistakes should be taken back in casual play, but in tournaments I guess they stand.

Of course the general idea is to prevent people blowing up the world to stop their opponent winning...
 
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Stokey Brown
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I understand that the Nuclear War rule can easily be played different ways depending on your preference. However, my intention was to find out how the designers intended for the rule to be interpreted. When you think about it, it's a really unusual rule when not combined with any rules that explicitly define at what exact point a card has been "played". The designers could have just as easily said that actions lowering DEFCON to 1 were against the rules, rather than ending the game. This is essentially the same effect as playing a card, realizing that it causes nuclear war, and taking it back to play something else (which is the same thing that most people would do after realizing that their actions broke the rules). If this is what the designers had in mind, then it's kind of interesting how they added a rule that says that you CAN cause a nuclear war, but that you lose.

My question was to see if the designers had in mind to have the nuclear war rule in the game as a concession to what people expect from a game about the Cold War (ie: that nuclear annihiliation was quite possible) even if they intended for accidental causals to be taken back, or if they intended the rule to be representative of the uncertainty of any given moment, and that nuclear war could have accidentally been caused quite easily (ie: they intended accidental plays that caused nuclear war to be enforced, thus resulting in a game-time limiting mechanism on top of its other uses). If it's the second option, at what point can a play no longer be taken back and why were these rules not included with the game?

I hope that's all clear.
 
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Jason Matthews
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zurupeto wrote:
My question was to see if the designers had in mind to have the nuclear war rule in the game as a concession to what people expect from a game about the Cold War (ie: that nuclear annihiliation was quite possible) even if they intended for accidental causals to be taken back, or if they intended the rule to be representative of the uncertainty of any given moment, and that nuclear war could have accidentally been caused quite easily (ie: they intended accidental plays that caused nuclear war to be enforced, thus resulting in a game-time limiting mechanism on top of its other uses). If it's the second option, at what point can a play no longer be taken back and why were these rules not included with the game?


Jeff,

The intent was to reflect the fact that nuclear war could errupt unwittingly. If you play too tight a game of brinskmanship, and keep DEFCON at 2 at all times, it might just bite you in the a**. A "you may not cause a nuclear war" rule would have deprived the game of some of its tension, and would have been less simulative in a certain sense.

If you are playing in a competitve game, you can't take back a move. You should check the DEFCON before couping Brazil, for example. As between casual players, Ananda and I have no desire to regulate styles of play. I always allow opponents to take back a dumb world ending move. So a combination of cards that a player could not forsee, or avoid that leads to DEFCON 1 should be enforced. If my opponent forgot that we were on DEFCON 2 and is about to coup a battleground, I'll just point it out, and he/she can do something else with the ops.

Glad you are enjoying the game.

Jason
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