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Subject: cheapest way to be competitive? rss

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Brandon Fraley
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Hi I'm new to netrunner and have enjoyed the couple games I've played so far. One of the things I was so attracted to was the idea that netrunner would be cheaper and easier to mentally sta on top of because of the lcg format. However new sets seem to come out every single month and it feels completely overwhelming mentally and financially.

I'm hoping that someone can fill me in on how these sets usually work and how I can get by without needing to buy all off them and still stay competitive.

Thanks,

-B
 
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Conor Hickey
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A cycle is six monthly packs, and will probably be followed by a 'big box' expansion - so six months of the year you'll need to spend about $10, and one $20-$25 - to get every card.

As for staying competitive, if you're going to play in tournaments you probably need access to most if not all the cards available, if you want to stay competitive locally you most likely don't need them all.
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Drake Villareal
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Cheesesailor77 wrote:
Hi I'm new to netrunner and have enjoyed the couple games I've played so far. One of the things I was so attracted to was the idea that netrunner would be cheaper and easier to mentally sta on top of because of the lcg format. However new sets seem to come out every single month and it feels completely overwhelming mentally and financially.

I'm hoping that someone can fill me in on how these sets usually work and how I can get by without needing to buy all off them and still stay competitive.

Thanks,

-B


If you don't want to go whole hog, then just focus on 2 factions (1 runner 1 corp).

HB and Shaper is your best bet, since you can pick up the core set, the first deluxe box, and one or two data packs to round things out.

By then, you're already halfway to a full set!
 
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Patrick G.
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Just buy them all slowly. It's hell of a lot cheaper than magic or any collectible card game.
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Martin Presley
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Roughly speaking, in a year you can expect at least 1 full cycle (6 expansions of 20 new cards) and a deluxe expansion (lots of cards exclusively for 2 factions plus some neutrals). That adds up to around $125 a year to pick up everything, if you buy it at a retail store. I would say the cheapest way to be competitive is pick up 2 core sets off of Amazon, which'll run you under $50 total at the right time, then pick up the expansions in the order of relevance to your preferred factions.

I like to get everything, even though I only play Criminal/Weyland, because I like having the full options, and I never know what cards I will want in the future. I'd recommend doing the same if you really want to stay on the bleeding competitive edge, but it's a project that can be done over time. If you devote just $30 a month to Netrunner, to buy the lastest Spin cycle expansion and one Genesis expansion, you'll get there in 7 months (including Creation and Control). Pretty manageable.

You'll also want to get sleeves and a storage solution eventually, of course. While that's not a large expense, I'd recommend spending a little more to get higher-quality sleeves (Ultra Pro Matte is amazing) and nice binders where you can sort everything easily. I spent about $50 retail for my stuff, and I'm totally happy with it.

Alternatively you could place a single large order for everything off of an online distributor, like Funagain; I just checked and it's just shy of $100 for Genesis and C&C. This is less money over the long haul, but of course you pay for it all at once. Given what you've said about being overwhelmed mentally, I'd just get two packs a month and build up that way.
 
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James Ryan
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You'll need either 2 core sets, or 1 and a "completion set" from ebay, which fills in all the 2 ofs and 1 ofs.

Then you'll need somebody to give you a spare copy of the andromeda ID (and maybe some of the other IDS) until you pick up the relevant data packs.

That should give you a pretty good start.

Then just fill in a data pack at a time here and there, focusing on the cards you most want for whatever decks you are wanting to play in local tournaments.
 
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Lyrael Tyranous
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In Magic, you will spend a lot more on boosters, and you don't even get a big chunk of the card pool. In Netrunner, the 15 a month and then 25-30 for the big box gets you every copy of a card that you can legally play in a deck.

Be aware that LCGs are cheaper than CCGs if you want to stay competitive. There is an expanding card pool for both, and its not that you won't have to spend any money regularly in an LCG to stay competitive, you just have to spend a lot less (15 a month, and then 25-30 for the big box).
 
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Kasper Lauest
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Yeah, it's really not as expensive as it seems. Sure, there's a sizable initial investment, but from there on a data pack a month shouldn't be a big deal. Infact, I used to think that I didn't want to buy everything but now I can't wait for data packs to come out.

But you can absolutely be competitive by buying two core sets and the extra data packs needed for your favourite factions. Only trouble is that you might get bored playing the same factions.

For instance, for my fairly typical KATMAN build you'd need:

- Two base sets (although a third Desperado would be very nice and indeed I do have three core sets)
- Creation & Control
- What Lies Ahead (for Plascrete Carapace)
- A Study In Static (for Deus X)
- Humanity's Shadow (for Kati Jones)
- Future Proof (for R&D Interface/Indexing)

And if you're strapped for cash you could build a decent Katman deck with just two core sets and Creation & Control. But really, let's not kid around. If your true aim is to be COMPETITIVE at a tournament level, you are pretty much gonna want everything.
 
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Jeramy Poulin
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You can purchase core set top ups from a number of places without having to buy a 2nd or 3rd core set. This would especially be good if you didn't feel a need for 3 copies of the 'rares' (the 11 cards that are only have single copies) and just wanted 3 copies of the 'uncommons' (the 55 cards that only have 2 copies in core)

It is possibly as well to purchase an entire factions worth of cards across an entire cycle for less than the cost of a single data pack (say like all the criminal cards from the first 6 smaller expansions of genesis cycle). You would want one corp set, one runner set, and probably neutrals from both as well. The cost adds up and you would have only needed to spend a little more for all 6 data packs so I don't really recommend this.

Alternately play for awhile, decide on a set of decks you want to concentrate on, and only purchase data packs and expansions that have the cards you want.
 
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Karl Parakenings
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I had a longer post but lost it. The sum of it was: play a lot and read widely and listen to tons of podcasts. That's way more important than which cards you have. OCTGN is your friend.
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Rachel Hodgins
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If I were you, I'd look through and read up on which factions you wish to play. You really only need 1 corp and 1 runner deck for competitive play. Read the cards on card db website and try to figure out which ones compliment your play style the best. Then you can pick up individual sets based on faction from team covenant or ebay. Those usually run about the same price for 1 data pack. It would be a good place to start, IMO.
 
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Martin Presley
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reihodgins wrote:
If I were you, I'd look through and read up on which factions you wish to play. You really only need 1 corp and 1 runner deck for competitive play. Read the cards on card db website and try to figure out which ones compliment your play style the best. Then you can pick up individual sets based on faction from team covenant or ebay. Those usually run about the same price for 1 data pack. It would be a good place to start, IMO.


I really don't like this approach, because splashing is a big part of deckbuilding, and if I want to be competitive, I want access to all of the cards. Besides, it's easier to take in mentally if you slowly acquire cards for your decks.
 
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David Boeren
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Being competitive has little to do with cards. Lots of people have a complete collection who aren't competitive.

If you feel that the game is exhausting and overwhelming that tells me that you don't really want to be a competitive player. You should have known that there were monthly releases coming into this, but it's turning out to be more effort than you realized. My advice would be to just enjoy the game however it works best for you and not worry that somewhere in the world there are people who are better at it than you.
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Karl Parakenings
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I think that's being unfair. I can definitely relate, having only recently started the game - you hear that it's cheaper than MTG, and that LCG evens the playing field, and are unpleasantly surprised that it's commonly considered required to have every data pack and expansion. I thought about quitting too, but then realized how much prevailing opinion depends on the most recent card expansion.

The more cards there are, the more viable older techniques become. Virtually nobody runs Red Herrings right now, but it'd be an effective anti-Criminal strategy on HQ or R&D. I'm given to understand they were quite popular earlier in the year.
 
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Cheesesailor77 wrote:

I'm hoping that someone can fill me in on how these sets usually work and how I can get by without needing to buy all off them and still stay competitive.


I'm sure it has been said a couple times but here's another go at it.

Each pack has some cards dedicated to each faction and some to the neutral section on each side of the game. There is something for every faction in every single pack. That doesn't necessarily mean you have to buy every pack in order to have all the cards you want to play a specific faction competitively.

In order to be competitive while buying the minimal amount of cards you need to be intimately aware of what cards are in each set and how those cards affect your deck and the metagame you play in. If you have all of that information you can effectively decide if any cards in a particular pack are necessary for your deck.

It is possible to play competitively using one corp deck and one runner deck that you only update when particular cards come out. I did so for the entirety of the first cycle. I played Noise and Weyland exclusively, and for the majority of that cycle I was able to keep them very competitive with primarily core cards.

I hope that helped. TBH though the financial cost of a single pack each month and the mental effort of integrating only the cards from that pack that strike you as being relevant to the decks you're playing is relatively low imo.
 
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David Kotsonis
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karlnp wrote:
I had a longer post but lost it. The sum of it was: play a lot and read widely and listen to tons of podcasts. That's way more important than which cards you have. OCTGN is your friend.


I'd be interested in hearing what you think is important to read and what podcasts to listen to.
 
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Eric Chen
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To be competitive you'll need to know most if not all of the archetypes in the game. The best way to do that without spending money is to play the game on OCTGN. If you really want to save money I would suggest you play online until you build the deck you like, and purchase according to your build.
 
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R. Fetterkey
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karlnp wrote:
I think that's being unfair. I can definitely relate, having only recently started the game - you hear that it's cheaper than MTG, and that LCG evens the playing field, and are unpleasantly surprised that it's commonly considered required to have every data pack and expansion.


I don't actually give this advice to new players-- I advise easing your way in instead of buying everything at once.

Personally, I bought one core set to see if I liked the game. I did, and started playing more with friends, so I picked up a second core set. Then I picked up the datapacks, and finally a third core set. The third core set came later-- and not because I thought it was necessary for competition, but because I wanted to have six of the two-ofs so my friends and I could make better decks in 2v2.

...and even after that, it was still cheaper than one competitive Magic deck. whistle

I generally recommend that someone just interested in getting into the game pick up the core set, and if they like that pick up What Lies Ahead, and if they like that get whatever datapacks interest them at the time.

Will you eventually want all of the cards for competitive play? Probably, but only so you can try a bunch of different decks. Most of my decks definitely don't feature cards from all datapacks, and most staples are in the Core Set anyway.

karlnp wrote:
The more cards there are, the more viable older techniques become. Virtually nobody runs Red Herrings right now, but it'd be an effective anti-Criminal strategy on HQ or R&D. I'm given to understand they were quite popular earlier in the year.


Also agreed. Thus far FFG has done a good job of reining in power creep, and strong cards from early expansions are still strong. The only exception that I am aware of is Easy Mark, which can be directly replaced by Dirty Laundry in most decks-- but even then, you might still want Easy Mark for extra economy.
 
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Jacek Wieszaczewski
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If you want to get Netrunner cards as cheap as possible, get used cards. Some people get out of the game and they sell whatever they have. I think this is the best way of getting into the game now (to have everything released so far), with a bit of patience you should be able to get the cards at around 70% of standard price. Keeping up with new releases is not so expensive.
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Kevin Jones
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First off, buy the core set. You have to in order to get the rules, the base cards and one set of tokens. After that, go to a resource like cardgamedb.com and see which of these cards you want/need for your ultimate deck. When you find the exact cards you want, buy just those data packs and you're good to go.

I still argue that you CAN be competitive with the core set, but that's becoming harder and harder to do. With a little creativity, though, you CAN do it. If you have more skill at deckbuilding that I do.
 
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