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Subject: Real Author or Evil Computer AI-- You decide. rss

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Jeremy Steingraber
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This is... a thing.
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http://www.parentinginformer.com/board-games-for-kids.html

Poll: Authorship Theory
What is the origin of this article?
Christie Benson expert game developer: 3 time winner of vague awards
Evil Internet AI determined to take over Board Game Geek.
The inevitable Product of One Millons Monkeys and one Million Typewriters.
A thinly-veiled attempt to sow madness and summon Lovecraftian horrors.
Publicity piece for the Nigerian Board Game Royal Society of Gamers.
      107 answers
Poll created by Karmancer
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Alex Beck
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That's amazing.

 
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Stephen
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"About the author: Christie Benson is an expert game developer working in the most reputed organization. He has successfully completed nearly ten projects and also won the best game developer award recently. Apart from his profession, he is a best writer, who has written many articles on games such as bridge set, angry birds, super Mario, chess etc."
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Brian P Lewis
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Top 5 Indoor games for Kids according to my Nieces (aged 8 and 9)

Mice and Mystics
Zooleretto
Loot
Kids of Carcasonne
Flashpoint

Top Ten would also include

Hey that's my Fish
Catacombs
Zooleretto Dice
Castle Panic
Dino Hunt Dice

But of course none of us are experts.
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Sithrak - The god who hates you unconditionally
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I find it "quiet" clever that this guy bases his entire article on "helping developing brains" and "brilliant students", and manages to demonstrate through his writing alone what happens if you miss such opportunities.

Bnous pionts by included Scrabble!
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Wendell
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Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
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Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
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Reads like a paper done by an 11-year-old.
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Neil Blaiberg
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As someone who has just started writing a blog which deals with boardgames with families and young children, this article is awful.

I can overlook the fact that the author seems incapable of distinguishing between 'quiet' and 'quite'.

I can overlook the fact that the author refers to 'Chess Game' rather than 'chess'.

I can overlook the fact that the author has Monopoly in a list of games that children must play.

However the Snakes and Ladders part confuses me. I've written a blog post on the benefits of S&L with very young children, but the author claims it's educational and teaches moral values.....really?
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Matt Kruczek
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TheRiddler1976 wrote:
However the Snakes and Ladders part confuses me. I've written a blog post on the benefits of S&L with very young children, but the author claims it's educational and teaches moral values.....really?


That's the mysteriously well-informed part of the article. Snakes and Ladders is indeed descended from Moksha Patam, a medieval Indian game intended to teach about fate and karma. The board represents the journey through life towards heaven, doing a good deed brings you closer to heaven (up a ladder), a bad deed takes you further away (down a snake). That moral aspect is still visible on Western snakes and ladders boards as recently as 50 years ago.
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Sithrak - The god who hates you unconditionally
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TheRiddler1976 wrote:

However the Snakes and Ladders part confuses me. I've written a blog post on the benefits of S&L with very young children, but the author claims it's educational and teaches moral values.....really?


Well, if I had to guess, I'd say that he's probably referring to basic counting skills as far as education goes, and the ability to deal with being beaten at the game (or simply suffering the results of unlucky rolls) without throwing a tantrum, ie. basic sportsmanship.

Which is not to say that I agree with him, at all, that it's the *best* game to teach those things, but I can certainly remember throwing a tantrum or two when playing Pachisi (somewhat fittingly called "Mensch ärgere dich nicht" in Germany, roughly translatable as "Dude, don't get so angry") when I was very young, better get those out of the way before the kid gets big enough to start flipping tables, eh?
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Aaron Yoder
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wifwendell wrote:
Reads like a paper done by an 11-year-old.


You are truly a generous soul.
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Alex Treacher
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wifwendell wrote:
Reads like a paper done by an 11-year-old.

I was thinking more like a webcrawler bot...
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Neil Blaiberg
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matt_k wrote:
TheRiddler1976 wrote:
However the Snakes and Ladders part confuses me. I've written a blog post on the benefits of S&L with very young children, but the author claims it's educational and teaches moral values.....really?


That's the mysteriously well-informed part of the article. Snakes and Ladders is indeed descended from Moksha Patam, a medieval Indian game intended to teach about fate and karma. The board represents the journey through life towards heaven, doing a good deed brings you closer to heaven (up a ladder), a bad deed takes you further away (down a snake). That moral aspect is still visible on Western snakes and ladders boards as recently as 50 years ago.


But.....S&L doesn't teach you anything like that. If it gave you 'moral choices' and depending how you answer then you go up or down, then fine, it would be instilling moral virtues.

However, all S&L teaches is that sometimes it's great to roll a '6' and sometimes it just plain sucks.
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Mark L
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wifwendell wrote:
Reads like a paper done by an 11-year-old.

wow I think the 11-year olds of the world would like a word with you...


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Neil Blaiberg
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Flamin_Jesus wrote:
TheRiddler1976 wrote:

However the Snakes and Ladders part confuses me. I've written a blog post on the benefits of S&L with very young children, but the author claims it's educational and teaches moral values.....really?


Well, if I had to guess, I'd say that he's probably referring to basic counting skills as far as education goes, and the ability to deal with being beaten at the game (or simply suffering the results of unlucky rolls) without throwing a tantrum, ie. basic sportsmanship.



Absolutely and there are definitely some learning opportunities, particularly for very young children (2/3 year olds).
It was the moral bit I was questioning
 
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Matt Kruczek
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TheRiddler1976 wrote:
matt_k wrote:
TheRiddler1976 wrote:
However the Snakes and Ladders part confuses me. I've written a blog post on the benefits of S&L with very young children, but the author claims it's educational and teaches moral values.....really?


That's the mysteriously well-informed part of the article. Snakes and Ladders is indeed descended from Moksha Patam, a medieval Indian game intended to teach about fate and karma. The board represents the journey through life towards heaven, doing a good deed brings you closer to heaven (up a ladder), a bad deed takes you further away (down a snake). That moral aspect is still visible on Western snakes and ladders boards as recently as 50 years ago.


But.....S&L doesn't teach you anything like that. If it gave you 'moral choices' and depending how you answer then you go up or down, then fine, it would be instilling moral virtues.

However, all S&L teaches is that sometimes it's great to roll a '6' and sometimes it just plain sucks.


I don't disagree, but we're talking 18th/19th century educational standards and methods here. It's a demonstration that good is rewarded and evil is punished. Yes, Ii's didactic, it's prescriptive and it assumes no thinking ability on the part of the child, but neither did anything else back then. [ETA: and neither do a frightening number of educators nowadays as well!]

That said...

I saw a documentary on the history of board games a while back and the presenter played a version of Moksha Patam with a Hindu historian. It was clear from what the historian was saying that at least part of the intended process of playing the game is reflecting on how you as the player react to the events that have befallen you, almost an exercise in self-examination when you are unable to control your situation. How do you behave when life treats you unfairly, for good or for ill? Do you complain, fight, gloat or rejoice?
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Neil Blaiberg
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matt_k wrote:
TheRiddler1976 wrote:
matt_k wrote:
TheRiddler1976 wrote:
However the Snakes and Ladders part confuses me. I've written a blog post on the benefits of S&L with very young children, but the author claims it's educational and teaches moral values.....really?


That's the mysteriously well-informed part of the article. Snakes and Ladders is indeed descended from Moksha Patam, a medieval Indian game intended to teach about fate and karma. The board represents the journey through life towards heaven, doing a good deed brings you closer to heaven (up a ladder), a bad deed takes you further away (down a snake). That moral aspect is still visible on Western snakes and ladders boards as recently as 50 years ago.


But.....S&L doesn't teach you anything like that. If it gave you 'moral choices' and depending how you answer then you go up or down, then fine, it would be instilling moral virtues.

However, all S&L teaches is that sometimes it's great to roll a '6' and sometimes it just plain sucks.


I don't disagree, but we're talking 18th/19th century educational standards and methods here. It's a demonstration that good is rewarded and evil is punished. Yes, Ii's didactic, it's prescriptive and it assumes no thinking ability on the part of the child, but neither did anything else back then. [ETA: and neither do a frightening number of educators nowadays as well!]

That said...

I saw a documentary on the history of board games a while back and the presenter played a version of Moksha Patam with a Hindu historian. It was clear from what the historian was saying that at least part of the intended process of playing the game is reflecting on how you as the player react to the events that have befallen you, almost an exercise in self-examination when you are unable to control your situation. How do you behave when life treats you unfairly, for good or for ill? Do you complain, fight, gloat or rejoice?


Which is all fine, and sounds interesting.

However the article specifically states that S&L can be used to teach moral values. That's the part I disagree with. Forget history of how the game was developed, and deal with just modern S&L. Can you derive morality lessons? I doubt it.

I doubt it even more when you consider that by the time a child gets to 5 they should have long outgrown S&L - and I'm not sure children younger than 5 get the concept of morality anyway.
 
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Matt Kruczek
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I'm just saying that this wasn't something the "author" arbitrarily made up, rather they unthinkingly regurgitated it, like the rest of the article, with no thought to accuracy, language or readability.
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Max POWER
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Christie Benson IS in the most reputed organization....
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Franz Kafka
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terrakhan wrote:
Christie Benson IS in the most reputed organization....


And he is a best writer.
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Matthijs NL
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JosefK wrote:
terrakhan wrote:
Christie Benson IS in the most reputed organization....


And he is a best writer.


He has completed TEN "projects"...
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Alex Treacher
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Matthijsnl wrote:
He has completed TEN "projects"...


"...nearly ten projects."
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Wendell
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nomoredroids wrote:
wifwendell wrote:
Reads like a paper done by an 11-year-old.


You are truly a generous soul.


Actually I was afraid I was being insulting. To 11-year-olds.
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Cornixt
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Writing the articles when English is your second language is challenge.
 
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A Wong
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C'mon guys,

He's the best.

 
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Neil Blaiberg
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aylwong wrote:
C'mon guys,

He's the best.



Isn't Christie a girl's name?
 
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