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Subject: Master Compendium Character Death Ommission? rss

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Mark Mitchell
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I've read through the Master Compendium rules multiple times but I can't find the rules dealing with the specifics of a character dying. There are related rules but not the process itself. Maybe it's just my eyes, any help appreciated.

 
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Dominic Lauke
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gamecat_uk wrote:
I've read through the Master Compendium rules multiple times but I can't find the rules dealing with the specifics of a character dying. There are related rules but not the process itself. Maybe it's just my eyes, any help appreciated.



You remove the charakter from the game. His cards will be placed on the field where he died.
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Mark Mitchell
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Jordan Kane wrote:
gamecat_uk wrote:
I've read through the Master Compendium rules multiple times but I can't find the rules dealing with the specifics of a character dying. There are related rules but not the process itself. Maybe it's just my eyes, any help appreciated.



You remove the charakter from the game. His cards will be placed on the field where he died.


Ok thanks, just surprised this isn't in the rules.
 
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Bern Harkins
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Actually, it's important to know just WHERE a character died, since some treasures, and Walrus' special ability, can resurrect them from that hex.

We flip the character's card over, and leave the token on the map, with a counter over it. This also marks the location of dropped cards.
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Mark Mitchell
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Radulla wrote:
Actually, it's important to know just WHERE a character died, since some treasures, and Walrus' special ability, can resurrect them from that hex.

We flip the character's card over, and leave the token on the map, with a counter over it. This also marks the location of dropped cards.


Yeah I think they need to add this to the compendium rules. I'm considering jumping in on this game but this omission had me scratching my head.
 
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Bartow Riggs
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Radulla wrote:
Actually, it's important to know just WHERE a character died, since some treasures, and Walrus' special ability, can resurrect them from that hex.

We flip the character's card over, and leave the token on the map, with a counter over it. This also marks the location of dropped cards.


I use matching sets of 2 markers I have in my bits box. In my case I use Penny Gems (available in the boardgame geek store) but any two matching markers will work. I use (for example) a red penny gem in the hex where the character died and a red gem stacked on top of the cards (off the map) that he was carrying.
 
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Bern Harkins
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gamecat_uk wrote:
I'm considering jumping in on this game but this omission had me scratching my head.


Just checked out your collection and ratings. By all means, jump on in.

This is a thematic, immersive game that rewards tactical play, but is all about the experience. It is fun even when you lose. (Definitely more fun when you win, but that's true of most games...)

The rules are not really exhaustive (like for instance SFB), but in context, they work out very well. When playing the game, and encountering your first character death (given that dropped cards can be recovered) it's pretty obvious how to proceed. I don't really recall our first character death, but I'm sure we came up with flip-the-card and mark-the-hex in under thirty seconds. (edit- on reflection, our first death was Zane at the hands of York, and it was certainly well under thirty seconds to figure out how to proceed.)

This is an extensively play tested game, and it flows better than one would imagine just from reading the rules. The proof of the pudding and all that... it plays very well indeed.
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Bartow Riggs
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Radulla wrote:
gamecat_uk wrote:
I'm considering jumping in on this game but this omission had me scratching my head.


Just checked out your collection and ratings. By all means, jump on in.

This is a thematic, immersive game that rewards tactical play, but is all about the experience. It is fun even when you lose. (Definitely more fun when you win, but that's true of most games...)

The rules are not really exhaustive (like for instance SFB), but in context, they work out very well. When playing the game, and encountering your first character death (given that dropped cards can be recovered) it's pretty obvious how to proceed. I don't really recall our first character death, but I'm sure we came up with flip-the-card and mark-the-hex in under thirty seconds. (edit- on reflection, our first death was Zane at the hands of York, and it was certainly well under thirty seconds to figure out how to proceed.)

This is an extensively play tested game, and it flows better than one would imagine just from reading the rules. The proof of the pudding and all that... it plays very well indeed.


This game has a little bit of everything. It is mostly an adventure game and heavily thematic. It is also part wargame with opportunity fire, melee, ranged fire and a hex grid. It is a _great_ game if you like an immersive theme. If you are happy pushing meeples around (they have their place) then this game may not be for you. It is the play that is the thing. I agree winning is secondary. DOA 2 manages to be both tactical and strategic at the same time. It is no euro though...

After playing a turn or two the basic gameplay is down pat. I trongly recommend this playaid because it has just about everything you need in order to play on just two pages: http://files.boardgamegeek.com/geekfile_download.php?fileid=...
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Bern Harkins
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BartowWing wrote:
DOA 2 manages to be both tactical and strategic at the same time.



Don't forget logistics! Parceling out cards is a worrisome complication.

Fun as all h*ll, though.
 
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Mark Mitchell
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Our games group loves theme, we tend to play high interaction and theme or confrontational games. Less so economic games these days. I think this could be a blast after quite few beers.

My only concern is that the game seems potentially a little too random in regards to adventures and other events. Apart from obvious tactics are there any subtleties to play or is it a 'heavyish' party game? Do people min/max characters with equipment or do combinations of skills/equipment allow for some interesting developments?

I was just a bit worried that things could end up a little like an more interactive confrontational Pathfinder, where essentially its just a constant skill check game where strategy/tactics are very short term on the whole. Or can you go for a strategy from the beginning based on your characters and push a play style more (Stealing/Interrogation, Base Attack and so on..) or do you need to keep your play very flexible and just opportunistic?

Thanks for the info btw,really appreciate it, as the type of person I am I'll jump all in with Collectors/Master/Core editions all at once if I decide to purchase.
 
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Depends on how much random us too much for you. Some gamers don't like any random element at all, and if that's your group, DOA isn't for you. However, if your concern is that the game will all depend on the roll of the dice, have no fear. That only happens if both sides are fairly equal in strategy and tactics.

In terms of tactics, it all revolves around using your team well, hindering the opposing team, and the cards. There is deep strategy in handling all these elements and their interactions, so I can't recommend too many beers beforehand. DOA is not a party game. Without a plan, a sense of what to do to win, you will lose, unless your opponent has the same issue.
 
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Mark Mitchell
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Tobec wrote:
Depends on how much random us too much for you. Some gamers don't like any random element at all, and if that's your group, DOA isn't for you. However, if your concern is that the game will all depend on the roll of the dice, have no fear. That only happens if both sides are fairly equal in strategy and tactics.

In terms of tactics, it all revolves around using your team well, hindering the opposing team, and the cards. There is deep strategy in handling all these elements and their interactions, so I can't recommend too many beers beforehand. DOA is not a party game. Without a plan, a sense of what to do to win, you will lose, unless your opponent has the same issue.


Don't worry about the beer, we can easily handle Twilight Imperium 3rd Ed
after a skin-full. Sounds interesting. I'm watching Riki Royal's excellent walk through at the moment. I think this might be a goer
 
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